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Topic: Remixing?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Remixing?

    While I am waiting for "Love Them" remix to s l oooooooooowly download, I thought this would be a time to seek edification. I have asked about remixing before, but don't seem to remember a thing about it. Anyone care to explain to me what it means, and whatever else you want to say about it? I am completely in the dark -- metaphorically and really, as it gets dark early. Richard

  2. #2

    Re: Remixing?

    This should help... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remix

    I trust you understand that if someone suggests remixing your piece
    with less reverb, this is NOT what they are suggesting. :-)

    - klassical

  3. #3

    Re: Remixing?

    I don't know a whole lot about the process; others will want to correct me on a few points.

    Remixing involves having another musician create a derivative work based on elements sampled from your piece.

    Usually it refers to having someone create a new composition that is more in the style of electronic dance music. Often it involves taking melodic elements from your composition and superimposing them onto a robotic drum machine rhythm in a highly repetitive, minimalist style.

    This usually involves electronically altering the key and the tempo of the samples taken from the source material to meet the requirements of whatever trendy dance style the remix artist intends to emulate. The remix will have a different tempo than the original piece.

    In addition, the remix artist will often record or add his own original elements to the arrangement. This may involve incorporating samples and loops from other sources, or recording additional keyboard, guitar, vocal or other parts to add to the ones he's taking from your source recording.

    Remixing is almost an industry unto itself, and there are a legion of composer/engineer/producers out there who define themselves as remix artists. The genre and its history have more or less paralleled the development of the genre of hip-hop music, which goes back thirty years or so.

    Generally if you have a remix artist create a new piece based on your work, you will provide the remix artist with your original tracks individually in addition to a full mix, so that the artist can select which elements he wants to use in the new recording.

    Then there's the issue of who holds the copyright to the remix. My understanding is that remixes are usually done as work-for-hire in which the composer of the original work (or his record label or production company) pays the remix artist a flat fee, and the original composer retains full copyright over the remix.

    Software environments currently popular for remixing include Ableton Live, Propellerhead Reason (and ReCycle), and Sony Acid.More general-purpose recording environments such as Cubase, Sonar and Logic may also be used.

    Several magazines cover the remix genre. There's even a magazine called Remix:

    http://www.remixmag.com/
    Wheat Williams
    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Music Copyist in Sibelius
    Apple MacBook Pro, Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion
    Apple Certified Support Professional. I also work with Windows.

  4. #4
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: Remixing?

    Quote Originally Posted by klassical
    This should help... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remix

    I trust you understand that if someone suggests remixing your piece
    with less reverb, this is NOT what they are suggesting. :-)

    - klassical
    Well, yes, I did sort of understand that.

    Reading the wikipedia articles and Wheat Williams comments told me what I needed to know, so thanks to you both.

    Richard

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