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Topic: New to Orchestral music - need listening recommendations

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  1. #1

    New to Orchestral music - need listening recommendations

    Hello, I am new to orchestra music but I have always loved hearing it in movies, video games, and wherever else I could hear it. I am very interested in learning more about this type of music but I really have no idea where to start to begin building a music collection for this genre. I am not sure if this is the right place to ask :S but I am wondering if anyone can a point a fellow music lover in the right direction. As you can tell I do not know much yet, but I am eager to learn and I appreciate your time and patience! Thanks a ton!

  2. #2

    Re: New to Orchestral music - need listening recommendations

    Welcome aboard, ram32!

    For starters, the standard four B's: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms.

    Best,

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

    Yes, yes, I know. A shortcoming in my schooling...

    .

  3. #3
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: New to Orchestral music - need listening recommendations

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux
    For starters, the standard four B's: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms.

    Yes, yes, I know. A shortcoming in my schooling....
    A hearty welcome, ram32. Listen to David, he has good taste, lol. Don't forget the other notable "M"...Mahler. Then there's Wagner and Bruckner and the Russians and Chopin and.................jeez. Do what I did as a teenager (a zillion years ago, lol). Find a quiet time of the day and listen to the radio. Classical stations will play a wide variety of music in a single evening. When I heard something I liked, I bought it. Another option is http://www.andante.com/. For a small subscription fee you'll have access to tons of music.
    Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
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  4. #4

    Re: New to Orchestral music - need listening recommendations

    Quote Originally Posted by valhalx
    A hearty welcome, ram32. Listen to David, he has good taste...
    Gosh, I don't think I've ever been accused of that before, Bill.

    ram32, a great many classical (and other) stations also have
    an online presence, too, so you can listen from your PC, as well.
    Such online stations are almost universally free.

    Bill's thoughts on variety are also on the mark. Listen to a bit
    of everything -- including things you don't necessarily like or
    understand (yet!)... it broadens the pallette.

    Best,

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  5. #5
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    Re: New to Orchestral music - need listening recommendations

    Another option, if you have a little time and money, is to get a "music appreciation" text book and CDs. A couple of years ago, as a kind of reintroduction to music history after many years being away from it, I read through Joseph Kerman's "Listen".

    Still one more option is to get a course on CD. The teaching company has a good series of leasons (www.teach12.com) on music. The first one, "How to Listen to and Enjoy Great Music" (or something like that) is excelent and highly recommended. After you are done with that one, watch for sales and pick up others - I've listen to most of them and have learned quite a bit. (I usually listen to a course about a period or composer before doing an in-depth study using the scores, other books, etc.)
    Trent P. McDonald

  6. #6
    Senior Member Eugene's Avatar
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    Re: New to Orchestral music - need listening recommendations

    Welcome to the Forum, ram32.
    There is a vast amount of orchestral works available, but here are a few specific recommendations you could listen to for a start, all standard classics and easily available on CD etc. These works give an idea what different composers were able to do with the instrumental colours of a symphony orchestra.
    Grieg: Peer Gynt suites 1 and 2
    Berlioz: Symphony Fantastique (astounding for 1830)
    Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake ballet music (complete ballet or suite from same)
    Holst: The Planets (written in 1916, has influenced many film composers since)
    Ravel: Bolero
    Rossini: Overtures (William Tell, Thieving Magpie etc.)
    All above have stood the test of time.
    Eugene

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