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Topic: MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

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  1. #1

    MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

    Just to inform you all, the MIDI orchestration tips & tricks section that was previously available on my website at www.maartenspruijt.com is now available through a new and separate domain:

    www.digitalorchestration.com

    I will continue to post MIDI orchestration features and topics there. New ones are coming up soon.

    Thanks for reading & visiting!

    All the best,

    Maarten Spruijt

  2. #2

    Re: MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

    Dear Maarten,

    Thanks for pointing us to this site. I've always valued your MIDI orchestration advice (although I'm not patient enough to create those wonderful tutti templates!) Your music is always stunningly realistic, yet you never sacrifice musicality.

    I can't wait to become an owner of your SAM products- just waiting for my next paycheck . When I was in school, I used the horn and trumpet libraries quite frequently.

    Sincerely,

    Alex Davis

  3. #3

    Re: MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

    Thanks Maarten - alwasy the gentlemen!

    Rob
    Rob Elliott Music
    www.robelliottmusic.com

  4. #4

    Re: MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

    Hey Maarten,

    I appreciate the time you to make this useful web page. I browsed through your FAQ which was helpful, but I was wondering if you (or perhaps someone else here) could help me out a little further.

    I grew up as a musician using Finale and recently received my bachelors in music composition, but I am very unfamiliar with sequencers. It seems like you and many others here use only the sequencer and no external notation program. It is hard for me to understand composing an orchestral track with no full score in front of you.

    How one can achieve everything soley through a sequencer mystifies me. In Finale, it's all pointing and clicking, but I'm going to assume to input into the sequencer you perform each individual track on the piano? Even complicated rhythms and runs - groups of 5s, 7s and 10s?

    And then comes the question of things like dynamics and articulations. If you wanted a crescendo in Finale, you would just draw out the crescendo with the articulation tool in all 30-50 staves in your full score. But say you want a crescendo in a sequencer...I don't even know how to do that in the first place, but regardless... wouldn't you have to input it into all 370 or so midi tracks? Or at least the ones that are playing notes at the time? And articulations... how do you input things like slurs, accents, and staccatos?

    I apologize for my ignorance, but as it goes now I do everything through Finale, and then export the midi file to Cubase and record with Gigastudio. I don't currently have my own sequencer, I do my work on the school's computers which is why i don't have a thick Cubase manual to read through that would probably help a lot. But please, if somebody could shine some light on the process of composing complex orchestral scores with only a sequencer, I would be extremely grateful.

    Thanks!

  5. #5

    Re: MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

    Bond6007: Cubase has a score editor, maybe you didn't know?... Also, I'm guessing some people would rather use their ears than a score

  6. #6

    Re: MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

    Quote Originally Posted by bond6007
    It seems like you and many others here use only the sequencer and no external notation program. It is hard for me to understand composing an orchestral track with no full score in front of you.
    Using a notation program is a perfectly viable and well used way to compose, particularly now with so many very good notation programs available.

    Quote Originally Posted by bond6007
    How one can achieve everything soley through a sequencer mystifies me.
    And for some, the reverse is true. For example, many mainstream composers use sequencers exclusively, for many reasons: the ability to perform a particular (perhaps exotic) instrument directly into a composition, the ease of getting humanization and expression into the music, or perhaps unfamiliarity with notation, for example. Some big time composers perform an entire score into a sequencer, and have a hired orchestrator do the notation.

    Quote Originally Posted by bond6007
    …but I'm going to assume to input into the sequencer you perform each individual track on the piano?
    That is about the size of it.

    Quote Originally Posted by bond6007
    Even complicated rhythms and runs - groups of 5s, 7s and 10s?
    Sure. And top shelf Sequencers has tools to make this easy to do, as do notation programs.

    Quote Originally Posted by bond6007
    But say you want a crescendo in a sequencer...I don't even know how to do that…
    With multi-articulated velocity instruments and a good performance, this is not as hard as it sounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by bond6007
    …wouldn't you have to input it into all 370 or so midi tracks? Or at least the ones that are playing notes at the time?
    Sequencer templates can get vary large indeed, and 200 instruments or more are not unusual. However, the instrument counts will soon become smaller with programmable multi-articulated instruments that can do most articulations with one midi track. A good example is Garritan’s Solo Stradivarius violin, a performable multi-articulated instrument.

    Quote Originally Posted by bond6007
    >And articulations... how do you input things like slurs, accents, and staccatos?
    …by using instruments that have slurs, staccatos, pizz, forte, etc.
    Explore the NS archives, and you will find even more information on this subject than you may find time to read.
    Doyle W. Donehoo, Composer
    Radar Music
    www.doylewdonehoo.com

  7. #7

    Re: MIDI Orchestration Tips & Tricks on digitalorchestration.com

    Eventually, I hope to use Finale to do all the work. Image how much time you can save if you do the whole thing in one process instead of splitting it into two (notation and sequencing)!

    So I'm in the opposite camp - trying to ditch the sequencer in favor of the notation program.

    However, the current state of Finale still falls short of a full grown sequencer in terms of midi editing. But being to both visualize and hear in the process of composing and arranging for the orchestra is the best way to work.

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