• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Topic: Jillijumbango

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    California Redwoods
    Posts
    2,937

    Jillijumbango

    Not a Wiegenlied. Not surprising, considering my predelictions.

    The mp3 is the best way to listen, as it was made using GPO Steinway.

    Jillijumbango

    If you have the Scorch plug-in, or down load it (free) you can look at the score.

    Richard

  2. #2

    Re: Jillijumbango

    An interesting flow to this, Richard, the longer
    overlapping phrases, gradually sliding and eliding
    their relationships between the two hands... it
    generates, again, that rotating cyclicity that is
    so often characteristic of your pieces.

    I'd love to hear this (and others) on the new Garritan
    Steinway when it comes along, by the way... which
    will better and more clearly handle some of the
    denser, closer spacing in lower parts.

    My best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Wilton, NH
    Posts
    2,450

    Re: Jillijumbango

    Hi Richard. I found this very interesting. I will admit that about half way through I was hoping for some larger contrast in dynamics or rhythm (you did change the rhythm at the end), but I realize that may have gone against the nature of the piece. Overall I liked this quite a bit.
    Trent P. McDonald

  4. #4
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    California Redwoods
    Posts
    2,937

    Re: Jillijumbango

    Quote Originally Posted by trentpmcd
    Hi Richard. I found this very interesting. I will admit that about half way through I was hoping for some larger contrast in dynamics or rhythm (you did change the rhythm at the end), but I realize that may have gone against the nature of the piece. Overall I liked this quite a bit.
    A bit more dynamic contrast, not much. You are right, the nature of the piece is the issue.

    David: yes, a really good piano is essential because of the dense bass chords. Some pianos might require the omission the middle note on many of the chords, to avoid muddiness.

    Richard

  5. #5

    Re: Jillijumbango

    Hello Richard,

    I liked the bombastic piano - went along with the disonant harmonies. This was very unique and interesting to my ears. The harmony reminds of one of my favorite Jazz piano players, McCoy Tyner (pianist for Coltrane).

    I sat down with the scorch score and played a little of this on my piano. I wish I was set up to record my piano, because this really came to life when I was playing it back live. The kids came in and were asking me what I was playing. It may not seem like much Richard, but they don't come up and ask me what Im playing very often anymore!

    Did you intend for the tempo to be rigid or did you want a more rubato feel? I was leaning towards the rubato myself.

    Cheers,
    Kenny

  6. #6
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    California Redwoods
    Posts
    2,937

    Re: Jillijumbango

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenny Long
    Hello Richard,

    I liked the bombastic piano - went along with the disonant harmonies. This was very unique and interesting to my ears. The harmony reminds of one of my favorite Jazz piano players, McCoy Tyner (pianist for Coltrane).

    I sat down with the scorch score and played a little of this on my piano. I wish I was set up to record my piano, because this really came to life when I was playing it back live. The kids came in and were asking me what I was playing. It may not seem like much Richard, but they don't come up and ask me what Im playing very often anymore!

    Did you intend for the tempo to be rigid or did you want a more rubato feel? I was leaning towards the rubato myself.

    Cheers,
    Kenny
    A little rubato seems essential to nearly everything. It is impossible for me to obtain in my recordings. Actually, in playing an instrument, it is nearly impossible for me to avoid rubato! In this case, just a little, sufficient to avoid a metronomic performance, enough to give it a light swing.

    Tell your kids they are wonderful! That is indeed high praise for me!!!

    I remember a few years ago, when I was playing Mozart on a friends keyboard, his kids came flying in to see what was being played, and I was then pleased beyond words!

    Thanks for telling me of your experience. I was aching pretty badly today, and this really improved my mood.

    Richard

  7. #7

    Re: Jillijumbango

    Hi, rwayland--I was deprived of hearing the MP3, unfortunately. I don't know what it is with the player on the Sibilius site, but it's dead in the water for me.

    So I played the MIDI file instead and I was happy to hear this tinky tink sound card (my online computer--not my music computer) get a good work out for a change! hehe.

    Now that my blood is pumping (I played it at a hefty volume) and I've had an enjoyable experience listening:

    --I would be very interested if you could talk some about the genesis for this piece. My imagination fails me in trying to imagine myself in the frame of mind or even having the ability to write something like this, so with it's with a certain amount of awe and admiration that I ask if you can talk about composing this.

    Thank you for the music.

    Randy B.
    (rbowser)

  8. #8
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    California Redwoods
    Posts
    2,937

    Re: Jillijumbango

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser-
    Hi, rwayland--I was deprived of hearing the MP3, unfortunately. I don't know what it is with the player on the Sibilius site, but it's dead in the water for me.

    So I played the MIDI file instead and I was happy to hear this tinky tink sound card (my online computer--not my music computer) get a good work out for a change! hehe.

    Now that my blood is pumping (I played it at a hefty volume) and I've had an enjoyable experience listening:

    --I would be very interested if you could talk some about the genesis for this piece. My imagination fails me in trying to imagine myself in the frame of mind or even having the ability to write something like this, so with it's with a certain amount of awe and admiration that I ask if you can talk about composing this.

    Thank you for the music.

    Randy B.
    (rbowser)
    With a slight thematic transformation, the ending of the first draft became the beginning, a common occurrence in my works. The final three bars were a last minute change/add on. The previous end was similar, but needed transposing and harmonic alteration. It was much too tame and conventional for the rest of the piece. The piece was first planned to end at about bar 100 and I had prepared a build-up to something, but definitely not the end. So I constructed a section to fit the preparation, with the ending expected then to be at bar 170 or so, but it needed a further preparation to achieve the strong ending that I wanted, When adding the final 22 bars or so, I remember smirking a bit and thinking something like "well, I don't think anyone will discover how I worked this out" and now even I don't remember exactly, but it was great fun. I take great pain with endings, being a strong believer in "always leave them wanting more". I finished the piece last year, but set it aside until a few days ago, when I made some minor changes.

    As you must have noticed, I do not find myself obligated to follow traditional harmonies or rhythms. In this, I observe the advice of Duke Ellington, who said "if it sounds good, it is good" and Walter Piston, Arnold Shoenberg, and others, who have said "the ear is the final arbiter" Walter Piston make a strong statement that the rules are derived from practice.

    Mostly, the piece is a fairly simple canon. Well, perhaps not so simple, but a canon. The canon is less obvious after bar 100 or so.
    There is an abundance of thematic transformation, something which I learned about from Arthur Rubinstein who says he suggested it to Stravinsky. Lots of fugal technique which J.S. Bach would be at home with. Like Bach, my strongest influence, I had not any compunction about altering anything that the fugal techniques created if it did not suit my needs.

    I approached this (and all of my compositions) as a construction project. The mystical dreamy composer idea is not part of my life. Once I have an idea in mind, what generally I am going to build, the construction project begins. The uniqueness of my music consists primarily in the basic statement of the original idea, and the manner in which I apply the usual contrapuntal methods. How I develop the starting idea, where it comes from, I do not know very clearly. Now and then, a complete piece will leap from my mind to paper in one shot, requiring essentially no editing. Mostly, once the main elements are clear in my mind the rest is fairly simple. I avoid frills and passage work. Everything, every note, articulation, whatever, must serve a good purpose.

    This may sound a bit silly, but sometimes, I have an idea that won't progress. I solve the problem usually by thinking, "well, now, if I had just played this passage, what would I want to play next?" I solve many problems by taking a long nap. Remember the play "Tovarich"? What did the General do? He went to bed.

    One of my military duties was teaching fundamentals of electronics and solid state theory. I was required to take a cram course in instructional methods. One thing they pounded on was "Tell them what you are going to tell them, tell them, then tell them what you told them". This has also been a guide for me in composing music, being another way of saying "statement, development & recapitulation". However, my development is generally unorthodox.

    That is all the details than I can recall regarding the genesis of this work.

    Richard

  9. #9

    Re: Jillijumbango

    Richard, you out-did yourself. Thank you so much for answering my question with such an interesting reply! - Sometimes I'm left wondering if people notice that I've asked a question, or have followed up answering one of theirs, since only silence follows.

    The phrase that seems to sum up what you describe so well as your process is this:

    "...I approached this (and all of my compositions) as a construction project. The mystical dreamy composer idea is not part of my life..."

    I admire the way you understand yourself well enough to make this objective observation. What you're saying touches on the old "left brain, right brain" model of how different tasks involve various proportions of the rational and irrational hemispheres of our brain. We now know that the way this concept was first laid out to the public was vastly over-simplified, but the basic concept of left-brain and right-brain at least still has metaphoric value.

    Speaking for myself, I feel rather squarely in-between the "mystical dreamy" and "construction project" models of writing music. Initial musical ideas seem to be plucked from the ether when I'm improvising at the keyboard and unconcerned with arriving at any results. Or phrases drift through my mind when I'm walking, or otherwise engaged in some other non-musical task. When I decide to take some musical ideas seriously, then the more rational "construction project" mode shifts in as I start arranging the ideas and making decisions about harmonies, textures, rhythms, and of course the over-all construction.

    But this thread is about your music. I want to add that something else I especially enjoyed in your response is this:

    "...I solve the problem usually by thinking, "well, now, if I had just played this passage, what would I want to play next?" I solve many problems by taking a long nap. Remember the play "Tovarich"? What did the General do? He went to bed..."

    Excellent. And we would all do well to remember that taking breaks from sitting at the keyboard is often the step we sometimes need to take as we work on a piece. Once a piece is in progress, we actually never stop dwelling on it until it's complete.

    Thank you Very much, Richard.

    Randy B.
    (rbowser)

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •