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Topic: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

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  1. #81

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux
    Many thanks, Alan -- including the further vote for my (as usual)
    unusual way of ending things.

    Perhaps what intrigued me most is what you said, maybe a bit
    tongue-in-cheek, about the piece giving you a "mental bath".

    Is it that the music sufficiently distracts... or that I've gone
    and washed all sensible harmony from your mind... lol?
    .
    Hi David,

    No, this was not meant to be tongue in cheek.

    It is hard to describe the effect this had, but it was very strong. It washed away a lot of mental stress. I can't even explain why it had this effect, but somehow it left a strong feeling of satiation, like many issues were no longer relevant or meaningful.

    And I don't mean it was soothing - it somehow had the right balance of calming and disruption.

    As I said, it is hard to put it into words. Hence I used the word cleansing.

  2. #82

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by GrahamKeitch
    Count me in on the Triangle!

    Regards,

    Graham
    You're on, Graham! And not a better man could I think
    of to play this challenging part!

    Forum:

    I will be conducting a lottery to choose the lucky forum
    member who shall have the privilege of playing the highly
    sought after ocarina part...

    Those who have the temerity to believe they can handle
    the daunting lines of this difficult solo, please let me know.

    My best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  3. #83

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by Locis
    And another great piece. I should to use this forum more frequently...

    Applause for a marvelous work.
    Many, many thanks for your kind regards, Locis!

    And, by all means, do stop by more often!

    My best,


    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  4. #84

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by Doralin
    I'm not good at expressing an artistic sentiment in English, but I'm completely impressed by your music. Wonderful.
    Thank you, Tatsu. You know, just knowing that
    the piece is appreciated means a great deal to
    any writer. I'm pleased you listened!

    My best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  5. #85

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Hello Jamie,

    As always, the pleasure is mine to have you listen...

    Quote Originally Posted by Skysaw
    Hi David,

    I took my first listen to this some time ago, and finally have a chance to post some thoughts. I'm on my third listen as I type this.

    It's a stunningly beautiful and romantic work. It certainly has much of the Sosnowski trademarks we know and love, but I'm finding this a more tender, patient, and simpler work than some others of your recent works. It is very plainly laid out and easy to "follow," if you know what I mean.
    Oh, yes; this is a much simpler work; little more than a song,
    really. After doing larger, more complex works -- several of them
    recently -- it's often the case that I'll "take a break" and do
    something less demanding. At least, that was the plan. In the end,
    this piece proved harder to write in many regards that some of the
    larger ones.

    The tenderness and patience I can take little credit for; as those
    are more reflections of the subject matter than my nature... lol.

    The lovely lush strings are simply breathtaking. I love the effect with the rumbling cymbals. This is a fresh take on modern romantic music.
    Neo-Romantic it surely is, my friend; my compositional tendencies
    lean ever more firmly in that direction.

    But Jamie, I am puzzled by your opinion that this is in some way
    a "new take on modern romantic music". Perhaps you would be
    kind enough to explain a little. As always, were you to take this
    small piece apart, I do not think you would find anything in it
    that has not been done amply before.

    I appreciate that nothing is too assuming, abrasive, or forced... it simply goes where it needs to go, finishes its thought, and ends right where it should.
    I've always admired the very same directness in your own work,
    Jamie. We all learn from each other, my friend; and this is a
    characteristic of yours that I hope I am beginning to emulate
    more often.

    Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful!

    Edit - I am getting a distinct Mahleresque vibe in a few passages. I noticed it just before I read your comment on adding a dash of dear Gustav where you thought it was appropriate.
    Lol... my heavens, Jamie, you actually read the posts! In
    point of fact, Gus and I go 'way back -- and he doesn't mind
    if I borrow from him now and again. Quite true, seriously,
    though -- I've always loved the way he handles brass, how
    he paces things; and undoubtedly I subconsciously lean
    toward his style in these matters.

    Forum:

    Don't miss Jamie's newest release...
    Luxembourg - Movement II

    As ever, my friend, my deep appreciation for your time
    and thoughts.

    Always my best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  6. #86

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Hi Jack,

    Thanks for the relisten and comments on this, my friend;
    I appreciate it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhap2
    Hi David:

    As I listened to the last 60 seconds of the piece, I felt it prepared the listener for a "reductive sound" type of conclusion. And, In my opinion, this worked well as is; however, I must admit that I was expecting something like a crescendoing cymbal roll (not too loud, with accompanying instrumentation) which gradually faded into the distance as one pensively anticipated the music's final chordal texture and moment. A "quiet moment, yes, but not "light in the tail."

    Just a great composition, David.

    With Admiration,

    Jack
    I'm pleased you found the pacing down and pulling back in
    the last segment ["reductive" conclusion] worked, Jack.
    You know, I tried something along the line of what you
    outlined above... a still rather quieter but more dramatized
    approach. Yet, there was something about the almost
    stark simplicity of the current ending that, to me, felt far
    more fitting. I do find it very interesting that we both
    appear to have considered very similar possibilities in
    solving the same compositional problem, though!

    All my best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  7. #87

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by trentpmcd
    Hi again David,

    I took your “assignment” seriously and re-listened to the your last 4 works (including this one) a couple of times.
    My heavens, Trent! I'm going to see if I can get you a knighthood
    for that... lol! That's quite a lot of time and effort spent!

    I think this is a lot more accessible to a “general” audience. I put “general” in quotes because I am thinking of “general” as meaning “the general audience you’d find at a classical music concert”.
    Yes. I should have been clearer, Trent. I doubt something like this
    would find ready acceptance with the broader range of everyday
    listeners; though perhaps those with a leaning toward Jazz might
    find the piece worthwhile.

    In the past few years I have been to quite a few BSO concerts but also to a few Nashua Symphony concerts. I think any of your pieces could be played at the BSO without a problem. Well, “The Discourse of Stars” is a little more difficult (at least to me), but “The Realization of Light” and “The Emergence of Time” are pieces I could easily see being well accepted by BSO audiences, and I have heard piece that are much more abstract than “Discourse” played by the BSO. (I think “Discourse” has some of your most beautiful moments, but I have a problem with “zoning out” occasionally as I listen, which I don’t do on any of your other pieces.)
    I rarely go to concerts; and haven't in many years; so this is most
    interesting and valuable input for me, Trent. My own conception prior
    to your input was that an organization like BSO would never go near
    any of these pieces -- for the simple, practical reason that their
    audience would not find them listenable and enjoyable... with the
    same comment amplified for any smaller, more regional orchestras.

    I agree with you on Discourse entirely, by the way. It's a large piece,
    exacerbated by the density of ideas per cubic second... it takes a
    long train of thought to hold onto it and requires holding a number
    of mental oranges in the air to follow it.

    Although it is unlikely to ever be performed, though, in retrospect,
    I would do none of it differently. It is what it is, and it is the
    way it is... because it had to be.

    “A Woman of Windswept Years”, on the other hand, would have a good reception not only at a concert by the BSO, but by audiences in Nashua. Although the NSO sticks mostly with “safe music”, I have heard them do a few new works that went over very well. Of course I don’t think they would be able to play it well enough to give the audience a chance, but that’s a different story… Although the other three might have an OK reception, "Woman" would definately fare better.
    Definitely good to hear, Trent. I've never had a great bead on
    what audiences are likely to receive well (or poorly). Indeed, ask
    me to judge audience reception on any piece whatsoever, and I'll
    probably get it dead wrong... rofl.

    As far as mainstream audiences go (rock, pop, country, “light classical”, etc.), even “A Woman of Windswept Years” would have problems.
    Oh, certainly! You know, I'm genuinely not an "ivory tower" sort.
    I really do care about reaching the listener; and it would give me
    great pleasure and satisfaction to write something that would
    reach out to a mainstream audience. But. The simple fact is,
    me trying to write to that venue would come out about like
    sticking lipstick on a pig... lol. That's something I think I had
    best leave to them who know how.

    If it were presented with a video, even one with a kaleidoscopic series of still images, it would go over well with even mainstream audiences, as would all of your works. (A quick aside - at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, everyone’s favorite display (at least when I was there) was a wall of video clips with Orff’s “O Fortuna” playing very loudly. I found it ironic that the best part of an institution devoted to rock used classical music!)
    Interesting you should bring that up. I've had some fellow
    says he's a video producer poking at me about it. And you
    know, I can't say I'm at all adverse to the idea, rather like it,
    in fact. Music is very, very visual for me... color and light.

    Of these four works ("Realization", "Discourse", "Emergence" and "Woman"), "A Woman of Windswept Years" would have the easiest time with a mainstream audience, just not an easy time.

    Of course, this is just an opinion. I personally like all of your work (dispite what I said about "Discourse", I do like it quite a bit) but I know "general" audiences may have a harder time. Anyway, I don't know if I answered your question. If you want me to clarify or expand on any of these thoughts, just ask...
    Oh, indeed, Trent, you've answered in spades and diamonds;
    providing me with a great deal of highly valued insight. I thank
    you profusely for this, my friend!

    All my best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  8. #88

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by germancomponist
    Ha,

    David, after a new listening I have just downloaded your very great work to my "Best of Gary`s Listeningroom CD "

    David, as I said, it is excellent!

    My best,

    Gunther
    Many thanks, Gunther! That you will return to the music
    is the finest compliment you can pay any writer.

    Gunny, I remixed this 06.01.2007, by the way -- a few days
    after your post. (This newer version is what is now on the
    .mp3 download on the www.DavidSosnowski.com site -- but
    I have not redone the .exe yet, so that still contains the older
    version from 05.12.2007).

    This newer version is somewhat better in regard to space,
    clarity and smoothness; so perhaps you will rather have that
    one.

    Again, thanks Gunther. You make my day.

    My best,


    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  9. #89

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by ailteoir
    well there's been so much said about this piece already that anything i say may seem superfluous. i loved the texture and the structure of this piece as i do all your work,
    but once again no kazoos???

    slán
    mick ó c
    Many thanks, my friend, for the very kind comments.

    But, alas, Mick, no. I had to remove the kazoo parts
    due to copyright issues. Fortunately, however, the
    ocarina part remains! Will that do?

    All my best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  10. #90

    Re: WOMAN OF WINDSWEPT YEARS - Symphony Orchestra (Sosnowski)

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux
    Many thanks, Gunther! That you will return to the music
    is the finest compliment you can pay any writer.

    Gunny, I remixed this 06.01.2007, by the way -- a few days
    after your post. (This newer version is what is now on the
    .mp3 download on the www.DavidSosnowski.com site -- but
    I have not redone the .exe yet, so that still contains the older
    version from 05.12.2006).

    This newer version is somewhat better in regard to space,
    clarity and smoothness; so perhaps you will rather have that
    one.

    Again, thanks Gunther. You make my day.

    My best,


    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .
    Thank you David,

    I will listen tomorrow, because I must sleep now... (have worked for a radiostation till now, and it is early in the morning here in germany.... )

    My best,

    Gunther
    "Music is the shorthand of emotion." Leo Tolstoy

    Listen to me, tuning my triangle http://www.box.net/shared/ae822u6r3i

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