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Topic: Producing score sheet music

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  1. #1

    Producing score sheet music

    Hi, this is my first post here, but I have been lingering and browsing for a quite a while now, I admit, hehe. It's a very nice music community, it seems that everyone is friendly, helpful, and in love with music !

    Anyways. I primarily use Nuendo to do my orchestra renderings (simple ones !) or general recording use. Now, I just got sibelius, and I was wondering what would be the best frame work for me to make a score from a recording. For instance, should I :

    1- Record everything into nuendo then export midi and import to sibelius and then tweak the score (that's a looooot of tweaking though)

    or

    2- Record directly from keyboard into sibilius and then edit that in nuendo (recording with flexi-time in sibelius didn't really work for me)

    or

    3- just record and do the score seperately with mouse

    or !

    4- Whatever you suggest

  2. #2

    Re: Producing score sheet music

    This subject has come up before, and there were several methods people liked, most of them doing something similar to number 1 or 2 on your list (with their sequencer and notation). Some even render directly from notation, which gives up flexibility in the rendering.

    I prefer writing and finishing an entire piece in Sonar, then when I'm satisfied it's complete, I export the midi, bring it into Sibelius, and prepare the score. Yes, it's a lot of extra work, but I wouldn't do it any other way. For me, the sequencer itself is a valuable compositional tool. It's so easy to double a line, change your mind, re-arrange section B to fit into section A, change time scale, do retrogrades and transpositions, etc. Also, now that we have such amazing tools such as GPO, it also serves as a check for orchestration ideas, balance, timbers, and the like.

    It was quite a shift for me after 20+ years on paper alone, but definitely worth it!
    - Jamie Kowalski

    All Hands Music - Kowalski on the web
    The Ear Is Always Correct - Writings on composition

  3. #3

    Re: Producing score sheet music

    I'd just like to say that Skysaw's advice is good, though I prefer to do it the other way round: I compose (partly at the piano sometimes first) into Sibelius, then I play from Sibelius into the sequencer Sonar, where I can tweak the balance, reverb, etc, to make it sound well. If the score is short I would print it from Sibelius before sequencing, otherwise use my dual monitors and have the Sibelius version on one screen, Sonar the other.

    It's all a matter of preference and convenience. The main thing is to remember that you need both a scoring version and a playing version because a sequencer's notation output may not be good-looking, and a notation program's sound output is probably not good-sounding. But these days we are getting closer and closer to the day when we will get it all in one program. (Please, before I die....)

    Greetings to all my friends, I have been busy tutoring.
    Terry

  4. #4

    Re: Producing score sheet music

    since I use Finale, maybe the rendering is a bit different from what is possible in Sibelius, but I do ALL my work directly in Finale (well, with a bit of help from pencil and paper).

    I get the advantage of having the playback I want AND the score looks perfectly publisher standard.

  5. #5

    Re: Producing score sheet music

    i think that i would suggest the middle road. if you have a DAW with a good notation program i think it is easier to just do everything in there, and if you need to show the score to someone export it to something like Overture, Sibelius, Finale, etc. and do you detailing.

    i also think it depends on what your goal of the project is. if it is to come up with a great sounding end product then i would probably do everything in the DAW (i use Logic and the notation program is pretty amazing in my opinion) and skip the separate notation program. you also have to worry about the complexity of your lines. if you can play them all on your keyboard then why spend the time writing them out (unless you prefer it that way)? i also know that some people get some pretty incredible results with the Human Playback plug-in in Finale - so go figure.

    in the end you'll probably see that it just depends on what you like best. 3 different people will give you 4 different answers, and you're just going to have develop your own technique. i suggest that you give each of these options a try and you'll come up with your method that works best for you. anyway, i hope some of this helped. good luck.
    -Keith Fuller

    http://keithfullermusic.com
    ---
    iMac Quad i7 * MacBook Pro * Logic Studio 9 * WD 320GB & 1TB Externals@7,200RPM * Presonus Firebox * M-Audio Axiom 25 & Keystation 61 * Rode NT1-A * Epiphone Hollowbody * Fender Amp * KRK Rokit 8's

  6. #6

    Re: Producing score sheet music

    Quote Originally Posted by Skysaw
    I prefer writing and finishing an entire piece in Sonar, then when I'm satisfied it's complete, I export the midi, bring it into Sibelius, and prepare the score. Yes, it's a lot of extra work, but I wouldn't do it any other way. For me, the sequencer itself is a valuable compositional tool. It's so easy to double a line, change your mind, re-arrange section B to fit into section A, change time scale, do retrogrades and transpositions, etc. Also, now that we have such amazing tools such as GPO, it also serves as a check for orchestration ideas, balance, timbers, and the like.
    I second Skysaw's answer. For me, composing should primarily be about the sound. In a sequencer you work with sound. In notation software you work with dots on paper--that's not music, it's just a means of communication.

    Compose the piece you want to compose, get it to sound the way you want. THEN notate it.

    I find composing in notation software to be unnecessarily limiting. I find myself getting trapped into cut-and-paste phrase structures and even, predictable rhythms. It's kind of like sculpting with LEGOS -- the barlines and notational limitations can box you into composing in set, predefined ways. Working in sequencing software is like sculpting with soft clay, you can do whatever you want and fine-tune it to whatever degree you want. Your imagine has more of a "blank slate" to work with.

    chris.

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