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Topic: Vibrato in general

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  1. #1

    Vibrato in general

    I am not sure if this message is in the right forum, it concerns the use of vibrato in real life. I am using the Strad.

    Listening to some great CD's to get the idea of vibrato I noticed that when a new note is "hit" it takes a while to hear the vibrato. And then it is gradually getting faster and less with frequency "sweeps". At the end of the note the vibrato is fading, as if the violist prepares to get the next note.

    If this is true and if I hear it right, then one has to introduce the vibrato after the start of the note and end it before the start of the next note. The vibrato speed increases along the duration of the note and decreases to the end, as well as the depth.

    So every note must be drawn in Sonar with controller info (CC#1 and Aftertouch) more like the shape of a block wave, just a little bit smaller than the span of the note duration.

    Am I right about that?

    Raymond

  2. #2

    Re: Vibrato in general

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond62
    I am not sure if this message is in the right forum, it concerns the use of vibrato in real life. I am using the Strad.

    Listening to some great CD's to get the idea of vibrato I noticed that when a new note is "hit" it takes a while to hear the vibrato. And then it is gradually getting faster and less with frequency "sweeps". At the end of the note the vibrato is fading, as if the violist prepares to get the next note.
    The initial observance is correct, but there are examples where this does not apply. A vibrato that starts slowly is a good concept for the beginning of a phrase but may be wrong in the middle.

    I would like to put that into a bigger context:

    One basic idea is that violinists like to develop notes. For a string player a note is a completely different animal than for a keyboard player. I mean this literally, think of an animal with a head, waist and tail. These are the three components of a string note.

    Head: Beginning of the note. Could be an inhearable start out of the nothing, or a big attack or anything between it. If the note is a legato note glued to the last one it could be as loud and as vibrated as the end of the last note - or conciously different.

    Waist: This is where the note develops. Often the vibrato gets bigger for longer notes. The sound may also change from softer to harder or vice versa.

    Tail: There may be a fade out. Or a crescendo ending abruptly. Or a transition to the next legato note. The vibrato may become faster and smaller here (often but not always).

    Do you remember those kids books where you could combine different heads of people with different upper and lower bodies. Same here - each head of a note can be combined with each waist and each tail.

    Moreover it is important that more than one note often build an arc. In the case of a legato arc the vibrato will often increase while you are getting up the arc and decrease when going down. If in this case every note has its own vibrato evolution this would lead to a "shoving" effect, an asthmatic sound that is often heard when strings are emulated by samples.

    If this is true and if I hear it right, then one has to introduce the vibrato after the start of the note and end it before the start of the next note. The vibrato speed increases along the duration of the note and decreases to the end, as well as the depth.
    This would be a good method for single long notes. In the case of phrases this would change like written above.

    So every note must be drawn in Sonar with controller info (CC#1 and Aftertouch)
    It is interesting to try out drawing to understand the concepts. After a while I would prefer to play it with controls.

    more like the shape of a block wave, just a little bit smaller than the span of the note duration.
    The only thing that I did not understand here is the word "block". Typical shapes for controlling string instruments are fade ins, fade outs, attacks that fall off faster or slower. But never any constants afaik.

    To say it short: On string instruments every parameter is changing always.


    Hannes
    All your strings belong to me!
    www.strings-on-demand.com

  3. #3

    Re: Vibrato in general

    This answer needs some further reading and investigation, more important: some experimenting. By block shaped I meant that at a certain point it is rather constant ONLY IN LONGER NOTES, while the expression can vary.
    But you gave a hint about the development of a legato line (phrase) and that needs some extra attention.

    Thank you Hannes,

    Raymond - it is as in real life: getting older also means (often) a certain automatic vibration of the hands ..... or not? I think I will start playing the violin at my 70-th birthday. One thing I don't have to learn then, is vibrating the left hand[hahahaha]

  4. #4

    Re: Vibrato in general

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond62
    This answer needs some further reading and investigation, more important: some experimenting. By block shaped I meant that at a certain point it is rather constant ONLY IN LONGER NOTES,
    Actually I think that either beginners or samples will have constant vibrato rates or widths. Artists will change everything at any moment ..... even if it is only minimal.

    An exception would be if a constant rate of anything is demanded by the style or the musical situation.

    But that is my personal opinion, no official school truth.


    Hannes
    All your strings belong to me!
    www.strings-on-demand.com

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