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Topic: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

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  1. #1

    What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    I'm a Mac guy but a friend of mine who's sadly behind the times computer-wise (P3 w. 512megs of RAM and who complains that Atmospheres keeps crashing his computer- well yeah!) is looking to upgrade his rig. Since I'm a little out of touch PC-wise, what are you PC computer guys using to successfully run tons of plug-ins?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    Thanks Stephen! Very much appreciated. I think my friend was looking at Dell systems. Are they reputable? I had a Dell Dimension that basically self-destructed (power supply went and took the motherboard, fan, half my RAM with it) which basically steared me towards Apple Macs. So I'm not sure my pal is safe with Dell. Also, their customer service sucks.

    No offence but talking to someone in India who already has language barrier challenges with English compounded with talking about technology terms isn't the best way to get to the bottom of computer problems. This is speculative or racist- I spent 2 hours on the phone trying to diagnose the initial problem with when my Dell had those issues I outlined earlier. A friend who builds computers was the one who accuratelty diagnosed the problem. For $350 he "fixed" those problems by replacing the fan which meant changing the case, the CPU, the RAM, and power supply. I swore I'd never buy Dell again.

  3. #3

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    Seriously check out Tyan Motherboards.

    http://www.tyan.com/

    Unrivaled.


    EDIT: http://www.tyan.com/product_board_detail.aspx?pid=496 /Spazz
    ~Sam Ferrara~

  4. #4

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    Quote Originally Posted by FireGS
    All those goodies but only one PCI-E slot?

  5. #5

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    If you go Intel, I would get a motherboard with a 965 chipset (instead of 975). It came later than the 975 and was developed after the dual-core CPUs came out and apparently has architecture that works with dual-core CPUs better.

    Also, if you go the Intel route, get at least the 2.4Ghz CPU (E6600), it's the cheapest dual-core that gives you 4MB shared cache (instead of 2MB), which is important for audio work.

    And, if you need lots of ram, consider getting 2 x 2GB memory sticks instead of 4 x 1GB, so you don't fill up all 4 slots. It costs a little more, but you can use > 4G if you use the 64-bit versions of XP or Vista.


    ... my 2 cents...


    buzz

  6. #6

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    Quote Originally Posted by buzzripper
    If you go Intel, I would get a motherboard with a 965 chipset (instead of 975). It came later than the 975 and was developed after the dual-core CPUs came out and apparently has architecture that works with dual-core CPUs better.

    Also, if you go the Intel route, get at least the 2.4Ghz CPU (E6600), it's the cheapest dual-core that gives you 4MB shared cache (instead of 2MB), which is important for audio work.

    And, if you need lots of ram, consider getting 2 x 2GB memory sticks instead of 4 x 1GB, so you don't fill up all 4 slots. It costs a little more, but you can use > 4G if you use the 64-bit versions of XP or Vista.


    ... my 2 cents...


    buzz
    I have read also that 4G sticks have come out/ will come out soon. This would definitely be a "wait till the price comes down" situation - but it will allow for up to 16G on a core duo running on 64 bit.

    So which boards will support these RAM sticks? That I dont know...but might be worth future-proofing your system for later to take advantage of these when they're affordable.

  7. #7

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    Quote Originally Posted by buzzripper
    Also, if you go the Intel route, get at least the 2.4Ghz CPU (E6600), it's the cheapest dual-core that gives you 4MB shared cache (instead of 2MB)
    Not quite so. The 2.13 GHz E6420 also has 4 MB cache. And it works excellently with the 975X chipset.

    I would make sure, the board supports not only dual core but also quad core processors.

  8. #8

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    i read on the cubase forums, that there is a lot of bugs with the 965 chipset and firewire soundcards, so be careful !! maybe the 975 is the way to go !!

  9. #9

    Re: What's the best PC motherboard for plug-ins?

    Davecos,

    Given your friend doesn't appear to want to upgrade that often, I would recommend he purchase from one of the audio systems builders.

    Most have good support, and you can be assured that the machine has been configured for audio applications and that all of the components selected work well with one another (which is a problem in the Windows world).

    Also, nearly all of the mainstream computer builders only offer the Windows Vista OS (Dell announced recently they will sell machines with Win XP Pro if you want). The majority of music software and hardware is NOT Windows Vista ready.

    One interesting configuration I saw at PCaudiolabs is a dual-boot system that contains both Windows XP and Windows Vista. This way, he could have a stable current system and still migrate to Vista when the platform is more computer musician friendly.

    Here are a few companies in alphabetical order.
    http://www.adkproaudio.com/
    http://www.carillonusa.com/
    http://www.pcaudiolabs.com/
    http://www.rainrecording.com/
    http://www.sonicalabs.com/
    http://www.sweetwater.com/creation_station/index.php
    http://www.visiondaw.com/productcart/pc/vdawIndex.asp

    The prices for these systems aren't that bad if you include costs of all of the components (e.g. exterior case, specialized fans/cooling systems, sound absorption).

    I have a Dell system (which works OK), but I will never buy an off-the-shelf PC for music again (just too many hassles I have had to deal with).

    A few specific recommendations:
    1) Get 4 GB of RAM
    2) Get a system with at least 3 internal hard drives (1 for OS and software, 1 for audio recording, and 1 for large sample libraries)
    3) Pay specific attention to the audio interface requirements (how many analog and digital inputs and outputs does he need).
    4) Windows XP OS

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