• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Topic: Daw??

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Daw??

    It's good to know that this recording is possible because of your loving attention to playing the music with a DAW. ... Randy said this
    It is part of a message from the Listening Room - Saint-SaŽns 3rd symphony.. completely done without notation and in Sonar. Sometimes I read about DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) and I always wonder what this is and what people do with it. And how they do it.

    As I understood from that suite of messages in the Listening Room, he played this in Sonar, note by note (I assume)..... but when having done this you have some sort of notation, or not? Please give me some more info on this.

    Raymond

  2. #2
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    California Redwoods
    Posts
    2,937

    Re: Daw??

    By whatever means music is entered into Sonar, there will be a staff view which shows the notation. You can completely ignore it, but it is there. There are various methods of entry, but the notation is always there somewhere.

    Richard

  3. #3

    Re: Daw??

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond62
    Sometimes I read about DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) and I always wonder what this is
    DAW is an ambiguos term. It can mean

    1. a computer dedicated to audio work
    2. a software with audio capabilities (could be any, but is mostly used for sequencers like Cubase, Sonar etc.)

    In this case I think the word is used with the second meaning.
    All your strings belong to me!
    www.strings-on-demand.com

  4. #4

    Re: Daw??

    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen McMahan
    Personally I don't think all forms of music are score-able in traditional notation (now - is that opening up the door for a discussion or what?)Stephen
    Let's hope not, then we will end up with ... I am right, you are wrong......

    Thanks for the explanation,

    Raymond - and this isn't even readable by humble humans like me


  5. #5

    Re: Daw??

    Raymond, I thought I saw that image somewhere before:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1_%E2%8..._%C2%B7_%C2%B7
    Colton J. Provias
    Film Score Composer, Location Sound Mixer, and Sound Editor
    Full-stack Web Developer

  6. #6

    Re: Daw??

    Hi, Raymond

    I'm just now discovering your question - You've already gotten SUperb replies from Stephen, Hannes and Richard.

    The comment of mine you quoted about the Saint-SaŽns 3rd symphony posted in The Listening Room was motivated by my great admiration for the work Kanazo did. He accomplished something that I think a number of people would assume had to be done in a notation program.

    Though it's possible, with the insertion of Many invisible commands in a score, to get very good recordings from notation (excellent examples of this are constantly being posted here in the Garritan Forums) - it still seems that many users don't get results that are nearly that successful. And that's why I'm often pointing out that it doesn't take nearly the same amount of effort to get more musical sounding results in a DAW--that it's easier for most people to get good results that way. But that's speaking only in terms of a Recording-not in legible printed scores.

    Hannes pointed out a confusion that happens all the time, since DAW actually refers to two different things - and yes, here of course we're talking about the software programs, which used to be called "sequencers"--and sometimes still are.

    Stephen explained PErfectly the current state of things--A strength of using a DAW is that it's possible to record music in a way which is essentially "old fashioned"--like a tape recording. It can have all the unqauntized nuance of timing which is the hallmark of music which is performed live. But it's impossible to render a readable score from that, since a notation utility will take all the input literally and display thousands of 32nd notes tied to each other, as Stephen described perfectly.

    And so for now, to render a more organically recorded piece into notation which is readable calls for Much extra work. The raw MIDI data doesn't lend itself to that kind of legibility.

    When I work on my projects in Sonar, I use a combination of methods, real-time recording, editing--I NEver completely quantize what I've recorded, because I hold precious all those velocity variations and timing innacuracies--but I do a lot of editing to make sure the results aren't just Sloppy.

    I said in another post recently, when the time comes for me to have a printed full orchestral score of my musical, "Dorian"--it will be a huge task. My data isn't ready for that kind of printing.

    But as Richard pointed out, a Staff view is always available in a DAW program--One Can enter notes right there in a notation-like environment if one chooses. And for impossibly fast runs, things like that, I do some hand inserting of notes.

    I just feel that for making Recordings, a DAW is the most flexible way to work.

    And so--my reply is mostly redundant of what's already on this thread but I wanted to give you my version of a reply also, Raymond.

    Randy B.
    (rbowser)

  7. #7

    Re: Daw??

    Quote Originally Posted by C J Pro
    Raymond, I thought I saw that image somewhere before:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1_%E2%8..._%C2%B7_%C2%B7

    This is going beyond my understanding too.... but it looks similar, that's true.
    BTW, nice page in Wiki. Most of it.... looks alien to me. And I am excused, 44 years ago I did my math exams......

    Raymond

  8. #8

    Re: Daw??

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser-
    And so--my reply is mostly redundant of what's already on this thread but I wanted to give you my version of a reply also, Raymond.

    Randy B.
    (rbowser)
    Thanks Randy. It added to my understanding of the DAWn .

    Raymond

  9. #9

    Re: Daw??

    re; notation example

    Raymond - That's from page 11 of Penderecki's 'Threnody (to the victims
    of Hiroshima) for 52 Stringed Instruments' (PWM edition).

    Penderecki was born in 1933 and is a well respected,
    much performed classical composer. Threnody was written 1959-1961,
    which puts it right about the time you were doing your math exams,
    so no excuse for you! ;-)

    Here's a wikipedia article about the composer...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penderecki
    "An artist is someone who produces things that people don't need to have, but that he - for some reason - thinks it would be a good idea to give them."

    - Andy Warhol

  10. #10

    Re: Daw??

    Quote Originally Posted by klassical
    re; notation example

    Raymond - That's from page 11 of Penderecki's 'Threnody (to the victims
    of Hiroshima) for 52 Stringed Instruments' (PWM edition).

    Penderecki was born in 1933 and is a well respected,
    much performed classical composer. Threnody was written 1959-1961,
    which puts it right about the time you were doing your math exams,
    so no excuse for you! ;-)

    Here's a wikipedia article about the composer...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penderecki
    Haha, big grin. That time I've never heard of Mr.P. Came much later.

    Raymond

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •