Now I'll apologise in advance if this has been asked and discussed before...but if not, I'm intrigued to hear what approaches the community uses, and why...

The Topic: What's your 'compositional approach' when writing and mocking up orchestral music...

What on earth does that mean...? OK...I have a friend who composes solely on piano (which is to say a sampled piano), who then later translates the various piano parts by assigning the different sample articulations within his DAW of choice for each part...but he only does that once he's gotten it all together as piano parts...

I on the other hand do the equivalent of loading up a generic violin sample, and construct my violin part using that, then same with the cello, etc, then assign articulations later to narrow down the sound to get what I want...

It interested me as a question as we had different approaches, and also lead to another variation on the question theme following an experiment whilst discussing this, where we grabbed a midi file of the 2nd movement of Beethoven's 9th and mocked it up with just generic syntheised sounds...
It was clearly still a great piece, and didn't suffer nearly as badly as I would have imagined from not having a full sample mockup...

For myself these days, my lack of available large blocks of time leads me to want to hear the bit I've done sounding as good as possible as quickly as possible in the time given, so my approach is to complete and 'produce' smaller chunks, rather than try to construct the orchestrated masterpiece (ahem) and then finally mock-up at the end by applying the correct articulations...

I'm wondering whether the answers (if there be any!) to that might split along the lines of hobbyists and those that deliver finished product for a living...or perhaps those who are classically trained and those not...

SO...Q1: What's your 'style' to getting the parts in...
and Q2: What's your 'desire' when getting music out..?



Paul