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Topic: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Question OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Hm, I don't believe I've ever heard one. Anyone have, or play, or have a sample of, or even give a discription as what the pipe sound like?
    Styxx

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  3. #3
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Now that's COOL! Thanks for the link Raymond. Almost like bagpipes (almost).
    Styxx

  4. #4

    Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Did you know?
    Horn and woodwind players kiss their instruments? Watch one, next time, and you’ll see why! The position of the player’s mouth around the reed or mouthpiece is called "embouchure" which comes from the French word "boucher" meaning "to kiss".
    Just joking - Raymond -

  5. #5

    Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Styxx
    Now that's COOL! Thanks for the link Raymond. Almost like bagpipes (almost).
    You mean almost like *Highland* bagpipes. Uilleann pipes are every bit as much a bagpipe as the Scottish version. The main difference is that with Highland pipes you blow into the bag and with Uilleann pipes you pump air into the bag using a bellows placed under your arm.

  6. #6
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    Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    The Riverdance DVD has a piece on it that features the Uilleann Pipes. The soloist is by himself in the middle of the stage and they have great shots of him playing the pipes. These pipes are much more expressive than the Highland Pipes to me.

    Jim

  7. #7

    Lightbulb Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dargason
    You mean almost like *Highland* bagpipes. Uilleann pipes are every bit as much a bagpipe as the Scottish version. The main difference is that with Highland pipes you blow into the bag and with Uilleann pipes you pump air into the bag using a bellows placed under your arm.
    Well, there are a few more differences
    • the Uilleann pipes are intended to be used as indoor musical instruments, whereas the highland pipes are definitely for use outdoors
    • the Uilleann pipes can be played in tune with other instruments, and can play a full chromatic scale
    • the Uilleann pipes can play rests (stopping the chanter, although the drones continue)
    • the Uilleann pipes have a range of something around 2 octaves, compared to the Highland pipes' major 9th
    • the Uilleann pipes also have "regulators", an additional set of drones with keys arranged so that one can play a chord by striking a key on each drone simultaneously with the side of one's hand (the regulators are otherwise silent)
    • you can practice the Uilleann pipes without going deaf


    Not to disparage the Highland pipes: they are thrilling in their place, and take quite a bit of talent to play well (for example, because they cannot tongue or otherwise stop the chanter, they separate notes using a series of 32nd grace notes, typically 2 or 3 between each note). But they are not "ensemble" instruments, in the sense of playing with anything other than percussion.

    Grant
    ==============================
    Grant Green ||| www.contrabass.com
    Sarrusophones and other seismic devices

  8. #8

    Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Quote Originally Posted by GDG
    Well, there are a few more differences
    • the Uilleann pipes are intended to be used as indoor musical instruments, whereas the highland pipes are definitely for use outdoors
    • the Uilleann pipes can be played in tune with other instruments, and can play a full chromatic scale
    • the Uilleann pipes can play rests (stopping the chanter, although the drones continue)
    • the Uilleann pipes have a range of something around 2 octaves, compared to the Highland pipes' major 9th
    • the Uilleann pipes also have "regulators", an additional set of drones with keys arranged so that one can play a chord by striking a key on each drone simultaneously with the side of one's hand (the regulators are otherwise silent)
    • you can practice the Uilleann pipes without going deaf

    Not to disparage the Highland pipes: they are thrilling in their place, and take quite a bit of talent to play well (for example, because they cannot tongue or otherwise stop the chanter, they separate notes using a series of 32nd grace notes, typically 2 or 3 between each note). But they are not "ensemble" instruments, in the sense of playing with anything other than percussion.

    Grant
    One other thing, on Uilleann Pipes you can turn off the drone and turn it on with a switch, on the highland pipes, the drones have to be going the whole time that your playing them.

    I do like both pipes, but I think I like the Uilleann Pipes more, though I don't play them. I do play the tin whistle and Irish Flute, which are similar in playing style.

    --Richard

  9. #9

    Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Quote Originally Posted by GDG
    Well, there are a few more differences
    • the Uilleann pipes are intended to be used as indoor musical instruments, whereas the highland pipes are definitely for use outdoors
    • the Uilleann pipes can be played in tune with other instruments, and can play a full chromatic scale
    • the Uilleann pipes can play rests (stopping the chanter, although the drones continue)
    • the Uilleann pipes have a range of something around 2 octaves, compared to the Highland pipes' major 9th
    • the Uilleann pipes also have "regulators", an additional set of drones with keys arranged so that one can play a chord by striking a key on each drone simultaneously with the side of one's hand (the regulators are otherwise silent)
    • you can practice the Uilleann pipes without going deaf
    Not to disparage the Highland pipes: they are thrilling in their place, and take quite a bit of talent to play well (for example, because they cannot tongue or otherwise stop the chanter, they separate notes using a series of 32nd grace notes, typically 2 or 3 between each note). But they are not "ensemble" instruments, in the sense of playing with anything other than percussion.

    Grant
    One other thing, on Uilleann Pipes you can turn off the drone and turn it on with a switch, on the highland pipes, the drones have to be going the whole time that your playing them.

    I do like both pipes, but I think I like the Uilleann Pipes more, though I don't play them. I do play the tin whistle and Irish Flute, which are similar in playing style.

    --Richard

  10. #10

    Re: OT-Uilleann Pipes?

    Sorry for the double post, I hit too many buttons .

    --Richard

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