• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 9 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 81

Topic: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Thumbs up Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    I'm not a huge fan of American Idol type shows, but this clip from Britians Got Talent is inspiring to say the least.

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=9oxTy7KIAaA

    -Kevin
    We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams …
    24" 2.4 Ghz iMac, OSX 10.4.10, MOTU 828 MKII, 2 Glyph 250 Gig external drives, Logic 9, Finale 2008 GPO, JABB, Strad, Gro, Reason 4, EWQL Storm Drum, Adrenaline, Symphonic Choirs, SO Gold,All Arturia Synths, Many NI Synths, Spectrasonics Synths, KH Strings, VEPro on a Windows 7 4x 2.8 Ghz 12 gig of RAM

  2. #2

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    A pity that the YouTube quality isn't that good, but he really has a great voice. Thanks for posting,

    Raymond

  3. #3

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    I was actually quite upset that this guy won 'Britain's Got Talent.' No doubt about it, he is gifted with a great voice - but it's really very untrained, and, in fact, his technique is terrible. Yet he will sell more albums than almost any other tenor, most of whom have devoted years to training their voices, simply because the show has drawn attention to him. And the British public will believe that this is what Classical music is all about.

    And I know music is ultimately a business, but allowing these stupid shows to turn the Classical world upside down is a new low.

  4. #4

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    Quote Originally Posted by Pingu
    I was actually quite upset that this guy won 'Britain's Got Talent.' No doubt about it, he is gifted with a great voice - but it's really very untrained, and, in fact, his technique is terrible. Yet he will sell more albums than almost any other tenor, most of whom have devoted years to training their voices, simply because the show has drawn attention to him. And the British public will believe that this is what Classical music is all about.

    And I know music is ultimately a business, but allowing these stupid shows to turn the Classical world upside down is a new low.
    Ah, but here I must say you are quite wrong. He has made millions of people look at classical music. There will be thousands if of not millions of people who will give classical music a try because they can relate to him.

    Unfortunately, many of the people who have spent years and years trainning forgot what it feels like to be the common man/woman. The become what some call "high-brow", snobs, and completely out of touch with the average person they share this earth with. The very people they want to love what they, do and support their chosen art, but very often they look down their noses at people who are not "classically trained."

    When I lived in Los Angeles and spent a great deal of time arount the "cutural elite" what I discovered was that I loved the music and dance but greately disliked the individual who considered themself the prima donas of the world. You see I worked at the Los Angeles Music Center for the Joffery Ballet.

    I attended an international piano compitition at the University of Southern California (USC). During one of their long breaks I sneeked back stage and found a piano and sat down and started playing. Before I knew it it had half he stage crew standing behind me listening. I did not know they were there until I finshed playing my little Scarlatti sonata and the began to applaud. I was so terrified by this I made my way to the door of the autitorium to leave. Before I could get out one of them said that I should have been in the compitition and he thought I played better than any of the pianist who were in the compitition. The actually wanted me to play more.

    When I tried to have a conversation with any of the pianist in the Los Angeles area when I would attend one of the soires, they only had one question, which was always asked first. Who did I study with. When I would tell them I could count the buggies I saw in their nostril when they turned their noses up at me and walked away.

    Most of the greatest talents of the world have had little or no trainning. I always remind myself that most of the great masters of composition of the past did not have the kind of trainning that is required to be considered the best of the best. Beethoven, Chopin, nor Listz went to some great conservatory of music and d'art.

    J K Rowling, I am sure did not have the formal education and trainning in English literature. No degrees, yet she is the only author to have ever earned a billion dollars from her body of works.

    One can train almost any one to do almost anything. Only God can give one the talent to begin with and to make one a genius. I respect trainning and education with measures and degrees. Someone with all that trainning would never try-out for a show like that because it is benith them and therefore remain undiscovered for the rest of their lives, buecause those who are already a part of the establishment do not welcome new comers with open arms.
    Samantha Penigar
    http://www.myspace.com/samanthapenigar

    http://www.northernsounds.com/forum/...p?userid=13306

    Dream it! Then Do it! Good things come to those who work while they wait. [COLOR=purple]Persistence[/COLO

  5. #5

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    Greetings, pop-pickers,

    His album has entered the UK charts at #1:

    http://www.digitalspy.co.uk/music/a6...bum-chart.html
    Vista / Sonar Home Studio 6 / GPO 2d edition / Melodyne Uno 1.8

  6. #6
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Shelton, Washington State
    Posts
    3,024

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    I'm not sure if he's going to be the next world class tenor but he definitely has talent. It might be the mix but he doesn't seem to have a great gift like Pavaratti, Domingo or Carreras.

    With his earnings I hope he will be able to continue working on his technique and performing after his day in the sun is over.

    Here's the dude that inspired all of them.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhZr78tu-CI

  7. #7
    Senior Member Leaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    2,797

    Thumbs up Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    This was posted here a while back, but good to see it again. In my opinion one of the greatests moments on TV. If there were more Mr. Potts on TV, I would start watching TV again.

  8. #8

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    Quote Originally Posted by Prince of Music
    Actually he studied for six months at one of the formost opera schools in Italy where he actually sang for Pavorotti, who supposedly really liked him and encouraged him. So he's DEFINATELY not an untrained singer.

    Tom
    I didn't say he hadn't had any training - let's face it, nobody manages Nessun Dorma just by singing it in the shower a few times. But his voice is still very untrained; he sings extremely sharp a lot of the time, he scoops notes, he has some ugly vowels, etc.

    Samantha, I'm afraid I still disagree. Many truly great musicians are the nicest people you could ever hope to meet - please don't use sweeping generalisations - being good at what they do does not make most people cultural snobs. And what you describe as the up-side of the pop idol phenomenon is also its downside. Millions of people will indeed now buy a 'classical' album for the first time. But almost none of them will say, 'Hey that's great music, where can I hear more?' because Simon Cowell's stamp of approval means they are already listening to the pinnacle. They will believe they've 'done' Classical music. This is about manipulating the masses to buy into mediocrity. Let's face it the winners of Pop-Idol and X-factor have not been great pop musicians - they've barely been acceptable - yet the phenomenon of the show means that huge masses briefly buy into the illusion, Simon Cowell makes a fortune, and everybody moves on.

    The other massive downside when the pop-idol approach invades classical music is that it destroys young artists. This, admittedly, is unlikely to affect Paul Potts, but usually, when a pop mogul gets behind a classical artist, it's someone much younger. Charlotte Church, for instance, had a great voice, but becoming a megastar left her no time for further training. So she went from being someone who churned out a 'very-poor-but-look-how-young-she-is' album, to someone who was still churning out very average albums of the same 'filler' tracks, with no more articstic depth, years later. Then she became a wild child, a la Britney, then a very poor pop singer, a terrible tv presenter, and is currently on the scrap heap of media laughing stocks. I might be way off base, but I think she couldn't stand that the instant fame was very shortlived, and is wildly trying to refind it in other media. Now who knows, maybe she would have decided she didn't like singing anyway, but if the pop-idol culture hadn't turned her into an 'it girl' whilst she was still very mediocre, maybe she would have continued her training and become a great singer. As it is she's just become a subject of gossip magazines who isn't very good at anything.

  9. #9

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    Quote Originally Posted by Pingu
    I was actually quite upset that this guy won 'Britain's Got Talent.' No doubt about it, he is gifted with a great voice - but it's really very untrained, and, in fact, his technique is terrible. Yet he will sell more albums than almost any other tenor, most of whom have devoted years to training their voices, simply because the show has drawn attention to him. And the British public will believe that this is what Classical music is all about.
    Interesting post! I don't think classical music is about anything in particular at all anyway; it means a lot of different things to different people. And it's long been within human nature to link the story of the artist to his work; it's not just the albums they want to buy, people have always enjoyed the "rags to riches" story of the artists. That's kind of what the talent show was about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pingu
    Millions of people will indeed now buy a 'classical' album for the first time. But almost none of them will say, 'Hey that's great music, where can I hear more?' because Simon Cowell's stamp of approval means they are already listening to the pinnacle. They will believe they've 'done' Classical music. This is about manipulating the masses to buy into mediocrity. Let's face it the winners of Pop-Idol and X-factor have not been great pop musicians - they've barely been acceptable - yet the phenomenon of the show means that huge masses briefly buy into the illusion, Simon Cowell makes a fortune, and everybody moves on.
    I think this is just a case of you having different tastes than the "manipulated masses". You can't objectively state the difference between what is "mediocre" and what is "great" and believe that everyone who disagrees is just wrong and manipulated, because everyone is using different factors in their heads when thinking about that abstract concept of "greatness" (again, that "rags to riches" story probably being one of them). It's true there are probably quite a number of people who would rather not think for themselves and let other people decide their opinions for them so they don't feel too weird about themselves, but you can't really assume to know what truly lies in someone else's heart (for lack of a better word). Just about every thing in art world is loved and thought of as "great" by at least someone.

    And who cares what everyone else thinks of classical music anyway?

    And what exactly is "classical music" anyway?
    Sean Patrick Hannifin
    My MP3s | My Melody Generator | my album
    "serious music" ... as if the rest of us are just kidding

  10. #10
    Senior Member rayzalaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    910

    Re: Paul Potts: A Lump of Coal That Will Become a Diamond

    Pingu,

    Samantha’s post doesn’t sound like a generalization to me.
    It seems more of personal experience, which I unfortunately can agree with in my own life over the last 40 years in music. I have no formal training but I listen. There are many good musicians posting compositions or arrangements here in the forum but very few with imagination.

    The fact is, music has to be for the untrained listener, not other musicians who by enlarge get tangled up in subjective versus objective. A very good local musician once said to me “Your bass player isn’t very good”. My reply “no! but what a singer”.

    Another recollection from 1970, when having an after hours jam session at a local venue a few folk singers were present. One of which could play every instrument known to man (slight exaggeration). He went on to work with Elton John playing guitar and anyone not knowing his history would see him with Elton and say “ok nice guitar riffs so what”. He is the most gifted musician I’ve ever had the pleasure to meet.

    Having said the above, I do agree on the TV fame game thing. The people making the most from them are the producers not the acts. They all have to sign a five year contract before appearing on TV not to work for anyone else. Sign their lives away for five minutes of fame.

    Ray

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •