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Topic: Crunch time: any sudgestions

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  1. #1

    Crunch time: any sudgestions

    Hi all,

    I have had my DAW for just over a year now and have done a few different styles.

    I have sent CD's out to composers agents and advertising agencies.

    So far I have not got anywhere.

    I have spent a small fortune on the kit and libraries and need to find a way of making it pay.

    I can't have people round to record as I do not have a treated room.

    If I can't get something moving then it is back to an office job for awhile ( though come September I have teaching commitments)

    Any sudgestions or should I be me patient and slog it out?

    Thanks for any advice

    Simon
    www.sounds-and-images.co.uk

    And now also at Flickr!

    http://flickr.com/photos/sounds-and-images/

    www.myspace.com/simonfielder

    NorthernSounds.NET.
    View Simon Fielder's Profile at NorthernSounds.net

  2. #2

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    What kind of music do you compose?

    If you're just producing albums - I dunno, man. I started out on CD Baby, then migrated over to Myspace, which is a fantastic opportunity for all kinds of free exposure to a hell of a lot of people. Nothing's come of it; our band's still unsigned and we play at local watering holes every other weekend just for the fun of it. But admittedly, I know crap about the business when it comes to records - so I have no idea how to get picked up in that arena.

    But if you're looking to write music to picture, I'd recommend advertising your services at a local film school and getting work there. Everybody's new and inexperienced, so it's a safe place to learn the trade (even an indy feature will require that you know what you're doing, at least somewhat!). But in film school, everybody screws up because they're learning - and you can learn right along with them.

    As far as dinero is concerned, you'll do mostly free gigs (but if you go to a film school full of rich kids, like USC or NYFA, you'll pick up some decent paying jobs), but eventually it'll all be worth it. That's what I did (and what John Ottman did), and the doors flew open within a year and a half as those students graduated, moved on, and began their feature film debuts at various studios.

    -Tom

  3. #3

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    Hi Tomdini,

    I have already released an album through CDBaby and I could easily get a second going, but for now I am concentrating on music for TV.

    I have some contacts at a number of Advertising agencies in London. The problem is that things seem to be taking ages to get up and running, being a fairly new composer( I have done demos 3 years ago) for one of my contacts I feel that I should be able to supply them with what they want.

    Maybe I need to give it more time, I just find waiting is frustrating.

    Thanks for the ideas regarding film schools, I had dismissed the idea before, but I will take another look at it.

    Thanks again
    Simon
    www.sounds-and-images.co.uk

    And now also at Flickr!

    http://flickr.com/photos/sounds-and-images/

    www.myspace.com/simonfielder

    NorthernSounds.NET.
    View Simon Fielder's Profile at NorthernSounds.net

  4. #4
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    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    no you should not be patient! you have to take your energy and go with it that means finding one focus and focusing on that.
    I have been doing a japanese cd since Feb. Man so much work to stay focused on a style! Thank God for Anime like Mononke series. (Fantastic style art work)

    Anywayz first things first^_- you have cd right ok time to take that cd and market it like hell! PR that baby!
    use it to your advantage. You know what's the hottest thing for music now no it's not films and it's not tv placement either (though comercials make bling bling) it's Games! Games are out of control now they want hollywood style budgets they want tons of creative efforts. Think about that route.
    (it just keeps getting bigger!)

    Let's go back to your demo or demos. Contact one of your agents asking what is available then make some demos (should take about couple days to a week for some demos) of those styles and send them to them. Contact them make sure they get them find out who listened to them.

    Get the energy going man^_^

    if you want to go the film route then find some indy films some students films, some short films man there is just to much!

    Talk to the producer of the project about the music then send them a demo to get on board^_-

    The bottem line is waiting is a joke man don't wait don't waste your time make things happen.

    The web is at your finger tips your have access to any forum for films games, short films, more indy stuff, cg projects, everything needs music!

    Remember that!
    StrangeCat
    All I can Say is...HA!...HA!...HAAAAAAA!!!!!

  5. #5

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    Hi Strangecat,

    I am not sure I have the abilty on the film side though I have been concentrating on TV ads and have given no thoughts to much else to be honest, I did think about computer games, but have no foot in the door or any contacts.

    Composer's agents will not take me on as I have no track record.

    I am sure something will present itself.

    Simon
    www.sounds-and-images.co.uk

    And now also at Flickr!

    http://flickr.com/photos/sounds-and-images/

    www.myspace.com/simonfielder

    NorthernSounds.NET.
    View Simon Fielder's Profile at NorthernSounds.net

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    689

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    dude what kind of attitude is that LOL! Ok go for commercials then.

    Medium for music doesn't mean anything. There isn't this secret way of doing something for one medium. Let's take an example.

    you get a thing from the director you sketch out some theme on the piano computer whatever for this thing, you then take that theme and use it through out the production.(different arrangements creating different moods for the production) because the director liked the sound of it.

    comes down to be able to communicate with the person in charge of the production being able to create multiple styles of music and delivering on all fronts.

    anywayz what is it you want to do with music?

    you want tv join Taxi.com try not to laugh your ~~~ off when you see there youtube video but that's pretty much how it's done.
    All I can Say is...HA!...HA!...HAAAAAAA!!!!!

  7. #7

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    Hi Strangecat,

    I would like to become a little more successful LOL.. I did start contacting games companies , but everything drew a blank.

    Do you have any ideas where to start looking?

    The thought of going back into office dullness, bores and scares me.

    Thanks for your encouragement!

    Simon
    www.sounds-and-images.co.uk

    And now also at Flickr!

    http://flickr.com/photos/sounds-and-images/

    www.myspace.com/simonfielder

    NorthernSounds.NET.
    View Simon Fielder's Profile at NorthernSounds.net

  8. #8

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    Quote Originally Posted by SimonF
    ... but everything drew a blank.
    Keep trying! Be proactively patient. Nobody is waiting for YOU to show up at their doorstep. It takes perseverance and a little bit of luck with timing. If you introduced yourself to a producer already call him/her in 6 weeks or 3 months. Find out about what projects they have in the works. Be interested in what they do. It is a numbers game - the more people you meet the better your chances of finding a gig, but it is also about finding meaningful relationships. The internet is great, but be proactive and meet people face to face. The advertising industry can be difficult to break into. I've heard of music companies here in Chicago spending $1000 a week on lunches to make the right connections to get the jobs. The multi-nationals agencies may be unrealistic to start out with. Maybe try smaller "local" agencies and TV/radio stations. Get your work heard and make those relationships with people who can take you with them to the next level.

    Good Luck,
    Derek

  9. #9

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    Hi Dvincent,

    I know you are right, though sometimes I wonder if I am doing the right thing.
    I will keep it going and keep trying new leads.


    Any hints towards the game industry would be much appreciated.


    Simon
    www.sounds-and-images.co.uk

    And now also at Flickr!

    http://flickr.com/photos/sounds-and-images/

    www.myspace.com/simonfielder

    NorthernSounds.NET.
    View Simon Fielder's Profile at NorthernSounds.net

  10. #10

    Re: Crunch time: any sudgestions

    Quote Originally Posted by SimonF
    Hi Dvincent,

    I know you are right, though sometimes I wonder if I am doing the right thing.
    I will keep it going and keep trying new leads.


    Any hints towards the game industry would be much appreciated.


    Simon
    Not really a hint -but more like advice. Don't for one second think that games are an easy ticket. In fact I would say it is as hard, if not harder than TV. The reason being that there are far more TV programs/adds being made than games. I see this train of thought very often "I really want to do TV/Film but I'll start out with games"... Those thoughts will lead to dissapointment...

    You compose for games because that's what you want to do, and because you are passionate about them. Find the medium that has your interest and go for it... Sure you can want to both TV and games - Just don't think you can use one as an easy mothod of acheiving the other.

    The sad fact is that there are 1000s of people wanting to make music for a living, and more often than not it's about who you know, who you worked with or perhaps if you are insanely talented you can get your foot in with no prior experience.

    My advice is to start networking and hanging out with, and contacting, creative people on the same level as you (be it game creators or directors). Do work for them and gain experience.

    You can of course skip all that and go right for the big gigs - but I guess you will be let down. Sorry to be the bringer of bad (realistic) news, but if you don't get a good sense of what it takes and what your chances are, then you will get frustrated and depressed.

    Keep trying in some way or the other, and keep improving and stay patient.

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