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Topic: Raptor Drive... do I realy need it ??

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  1. #1
    Power Profile User lukpcn's Avatar
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    Question Raptor Drive... do I realy need it ??

    Hello,

    I'm thinking hard on building new DAW and I don't know if I really do need 10k rpm drives....

    I was thinking about two WD Caviar SE-16 500 GB 16MB cache SATA-II (8.9 ms time) or two Hitachi DeskStar T7K500 500 GB (SATA II, NCQ) or Hitachi DeskStar 7K500 500 GB (SATA II, NCQ) (don't know the difference about T7k500 and 7K500 - any1 can clarify this to me ?) and deskstar is 8,5 ms seek time...

    for OS I'm going to have separate drive.

    so for streaming libs, and for playing 10-15 stereo tracks at once.. do I really need a RAPTOR ???? They are very pricey....

  2. #2

    Re: Raptor Drive... do I realy need it ??

    Quote Originally Posted by lukpcn
    Hello,

    do I really need a RAPTOR ????


    Luk, I don't THINK so. The 7200 RPM drives appear plenty quick enough here.

    But I admit I'm mainly bumping this up in hopes some genuine gear wizard will give us both the word.


    Larry

  3. #3

    Re: Raptor Drive... do I realy need it ??

    Quote Originally Posted by lukpcn
    so for streaming libs, and for playing 10-15 stereo tracks at once.. do I really need a RAPTOR ???? They are very pricey....
    Absolutely, positively not.

    That's not an excessive track count by normal standards, and people have been streaming libs for a decade now using Giga etc on much more humble drive setups than that. I'm even sceptical of the received wisdom about needing to stream samples from a separate drive to the OS. My live performance PC runs everything off one drive with no problem at all, and I've often run quite substantial Giga templates off the same drive as the OS in the studio, while using a separate drive for audio tracks.

    Raptors are not only pricey, they're also hot and noisy. And the simple fact is you don't need em. If something can play back without glitching, then it can play back without glitching. Reducing the HD seek time or data throughput by 20 or 30% may look great on paper, but it will make bugger all difference to what you hear if there was nothing wrong with what you were hearing in the first place! A bit like buying a very expensive car because it can go at up to 300 mph. You can TELL anybody you like that that makes it better than a car that can only do 200 mph. But if you live in a city and will only ever USE it driving within a speed limit of 100 mph, you might as well have saved your money.

    And if there IS glitching, it'll be due to setup problems, or maybe CPU limitation, not to drive throughput if you have two 7200rpm drives set up right and functioning correctly.

    Use the money to max out your RAM instead. I don't know what kind of system you're speccing but consider something with the potential at least for 8 or 16GB, and consider going beyond the usual 4GB, maybe in 2GB sticks, IF you'll be using a 64 bit system and have considered all the factors (by no means clear at this point in time) to make that work. RAM has the stranglehold on soft sampling DAWs at the moment, followed by CPU. Average consumer hard drives have been able to do everything we need them to for years now. There might be an exception for people needing to stream huge templates off one computer while simultaneously playing AND recording large track counts with exceptionally stable performance, but generally speaking the talk about faster and faster drives is just snake oil.

  4. #4
    Power Profile User lukpcn's Avatar
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    Re: Raptor Drive... do I realy need it ??

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouch that hurts
    Absolutely, positively not.

    That's not an excessive track count by normal standards, and people have been streaming libs for a decade now using Giga etc on much more humble drive setups than that. I'm even sceptical of the received wisdom about needing to stream samples from a separate drive to the OS. My live performance PC runs everything off one drive with no problem at all, and I've often run quite substantial Giga templates off the same drive as the OS in the studio, while using a separate drive for audio tracks.

    Raptors are not only pricey, they're also hot and noisy. And the simple fact is you don't need em. If something can play back without glitching, then it can play back without glitching. Reducing the HD seek time or data throughput by 20 or 30% may look great on paper, but it will make bugger all difference to what you hear if there was nothing wrong with what you were hearing in the first place! A bit like buying a very expensive car because it can go at up to 300 mph. You can TELL anybody you like that that makes it better than a car that can only do 200 mph. But if you live in a city and will only ever USE it driving within a speed limit of 100 mph, you might as well have saved your money.

    And if there IS glitching, it'll be due to setup problems, or maybe CPU limitation, not to drive throughput if you have two 7200rpm drives set up right and functioning correctly.

    Use the money to max out your RAM instead. I don't know what kind of system you're speccing but consider something with the potential at least for 8 or 16GB, and consider going beyond the usual 4GB, maybe in 2GB sticks, IF you'll be using a 64 bit system and have considered all the factors (by no means clear at this point in time) to make that work. RAM has the stranglehold on soft sampling DAWs at the moment, followed by CPU. Average consumer hard drives have been able to do everything we need them to for years now. There might be an exception for people needing to stream huge templates off one computer while simultaneously playing AND recording large track counts with exceptionally stable performance, but generally speaking the talk about faster and faster drives is just snake oil.
    I'm going to give a try with windows xp 64... gonna go for Q6600 4core CPU... 4GB (2x2GB sticks) for a start and later upgrade to 8GB....
    I was thinking about a 16GB RAM capable motherboards but there are only ones with NVIDIA chipsets... and I don't know if they are good ????

  5. #5

    Re: Raptor Drive... do I realy need it ??

    I don't know either, sorry. But yeah, if you're going for XP64 that makes sense to spend the extra money on 2GB RAM sticks.

    Personally the PCs I've got are doing everything I need right now and I'm not looking to upgrade for a good few years, until all this stuff has settled down a bit and all the parties involved in a total 64 bit solution have done their thing and are speaking the same language. It's a huge change of PC architecture we're experiencing at the moment, much bigger than the normal incremental development year on year.

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