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Topic: Samplng your own instruments???

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  1. #1

    Samplng your own instruments???

    Hey everyone!

    I am soon going to start sampling my own instruments and i have been looking all over the place and just cannot find any resources for how to do it well.

    I started this topic just to learn for myself and help others learn how to sample. I think it would be great to get some styles and techniques from some of the library developers or user's about the following topics.

    -Miking style
    -Editing Process
    -Obtaining Low Noise levels
    -Normalization
    -Programming

    I hope that this can evolve and we can all learn something new!!!

    -Jeremy

  2. #2

    Re: Samplng your own instruments???

    I think this is a great idea. I'd also love to know where to start.

  3. #3

    Re: Samplng your own instruments???

    Cool topic -

    Basically when I was building my library, the most important thing was just knowing what you wanted to end up with and working towards that kinda sound from the beginning. Finer points like whether or not to normalize, how to mic, and editing will all vary depending on what you're recording, your own preferences, and what equipment you have to work with. My advice would just be to plan ahead on all the details, and have a sense of how you'll eventually map everything even before you start recording; prototype patches are extremely useful.

    If you're interested, I did an interview with createdigitalmusic.com about my own recording and editing technique / insights - http://createdigitalmusic.com/2007/0...bert-roget-ii/
    Wilbert Roget, II
    Composer
    Rogetmusic.com

  4. #4

    Re: Samplng your own instruments???

    SampleRobot http://www.samplerobot.com/ is an easy way to automate the process of sampling a MIDI synth. But It can also divide up your own recorded multisamples from one large wav file and spread them out on a keymap. Individual samples can still be edited for those that prefer their samples hand-trimmed. It's a little pricey, but if you plan on doing alot of sampling, its worth it. They also include several hundred meg of instrument samples.

    Jeff

  5. #5

    Re: Samplng your own instruments???

    Make sure you understand proper gain-staging - this is what will keep your noise floor low. If possible get a good mic or pair of mics and go right from the best preamp you can find into whatever's recording your signal. I don't personally agree with the idea of sampling ambience, it's very easy to add reverb later and impossible to get rid of it.

    The absolute most important issue with sampling wind brass or string instruments is that you get the best musician possible. No editing tools are going to make a lame oboe player's samples sound good. This is the biggest weakness with many of the older libraries out there.

    Take far more samples than you think you'll need. It's amazing how difficult it is to get samples that match up when placed on the keyboard. I think there's a lot to be said for using an audio editor to smooth out attack envelopes, eliminate "fade-ins" and EQ the different samples so they match when mapped out.

    Once you do a little of this you'll realize what a great value the libraries on the market are, even the really expensive ones.

  6. #6

    Thumbs up Re: Samplng your own instruments???

    Quote Originally Posted by Will Roget
    Cool topic -

    Basically when I was building my library, the most important thing was just knowing what you wanted to end up with and working towards that kinda sound from the beginning. Finer points like whether or not to normalize, how to mic, and editing will all vary depending on what you're recording, your own preferences, and what equipment you have to work with. My advice would just be to plan ahead on all the details, and have a sense of how you'll eventually map everything even before you start recording; prototype patches are extremely useful.

    If you're interested, I did an interview with createdigitalmusic.com about my own recording and editing technique / insights - http://createdigitalmusic.com/2007/0...bert-roget-ii/
    Thanks Will, I have read that interview before and I'm glad you input your advice. I especially like how you metion to always go with something new and creative. Thanks for the advice!!!

  7. #7

    Re: Samplng your own instruments???

    I am sampling my first piano today, I will probably have a prototype intsrument in a week or so.

    I will give my notes about my experience soon

  8. #8

    Re: Samplng your own instruments???

    I had a project years ago where I had to recreate a specific upright piano in a hardware sampler. Here's what I learned from that experience:

    1. Even with a piano, record lots more notes than you think you'll need. Things won't match up nearly as well as you'd expect when you map the samples to keys, and you'll want to have lots of options trying to get a good blend.

    2. Do NOT record one pass of pp notes up and down the keyboard, followed by a pass of mf, f, ff etc. Take each individual note and sample as many dynamic levels as you're going to want, one right after the other. The reason for this is that slight changes in mic position, room humidity, piano tuning and the location of the Earth in the cosmos will be audible if you later try to velocity switch samples that were recorded hours or especially days apart. What's especially disturbing is when the stereo soundfield changes slightly in dynamic crossfading, due to mics having slightly moved between recording the various levels. You'll notice this in some of the old piano libraries done in Akai format.

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