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Topic: Quad or Core Duo

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  1. #1

    Quad or Core Duo

    I use Cubase SX along with Giga 3.
    I can't seem to get a staright answer about multicore support for Giga.
    Some say stay with Core Duo, some say get a Quad.

    I was thinking of my new main computer being Intel Quad and hosting Cubase then a seperate Core Duo for just Giga and samples on a seperate drive..

    Does this sound reasonable, thanks.

  2. #2

    Cool Re: Quad or Core Duo

    Gigastudio itself doesn't have the code for SSE3, SSE4, or quad optimisations, it will work. But just not optimised. However GVI is a different matter. I bought a cheap quad Q6700 and threw it in where the E6700 was. The amount of polyphony still relies on a fast memory sub system, but the amount of Gigapulse instances, and VST FX rose about 10%.

    If you think you must have a quad, by all means get it. But I load and play several large libraries and VSTi's live, and never once need to re load, or stare at my LCD at the gig. Strictly load and forget. That was before I upgraded from the E series to the Q's.

    I personally believe my 266 USD quad purchase was a waste, but since it was an experiment, the results were O.K. w/ me.

    For Cubase 4 / GVI / Muse / K2, all of these apps will excell better when their code gets optimised. I advise staying with Core Duo E6700's till next summer. That way the newly made 45nm CPU's will be cheaper, DDRIII, will probably have lower latencies, and the developers might even have new code optimisations for us. I believe that Tascam is way ahead of the competition finally, as they once held the title, they shall regain it. If not, oh well, I don't care who's the best, just the most stable. Since I have K2, and GStudio, my bases are covered.This whole hype about 64bit, and larger memory addressing will be an issue soon. Whoever gets the leap on that, is showing their foresightedness by being prepared. Right now 64bit isn't needed by me personally, and I feel that the future in larger libraries will come from smart developers using DEF, etc. when recording their samples, instead of the old 30GB libraries which only seem to justify their prices by cost.
    JimmyV

  3. #3

    Re: Quad or Core Duo

    Quote Originally Posted by scope4live
    Gigastudio itself doesn't have the code for SSE3, SSE4, or quad optimisations, it will work. But just not optimised. However GVI is a different matter. I bought a cheap quad Q6700 and threw it in where the E6700 was. The amount of polyphony still relies on a fast memory sub system, but the amount of Gigapulse instances, and VST FX rose about 10%.

    If you think you must have a quad, by all means get it. But I load and play several large libraries and VSTi's live, and never once need to re load, or stare at my LCD at the gig. Strictly load and forget. That was before I upgraded from the E series to the Q's.

    I personally believe my 266 USD quad purchase was a waste, but since it was an experiment, the results were O.K. w/ me.

    For Cubase 4 / GVI / Muse / K2, all of these apps will excell better when their code gets optimised. I advise staying with Core Duo E6700's till next summer. That way the newly made 45nm CPU's will be cheaper, DDRIII, will probably have lower latencies, and the developers might even have new code optimisations for us. I believe that Tascam is way ahead of the competition finally, as they once held the title, they shall regain it. If not, oh well, I don't care who's the best, just the most stable. Since I have K2, and GStudio, my bases are covered.This whole hype about 64bit, and larger memory addressing will be an issue soon. Whoever gets the leap on that, is showing their foresightedness by being prepared. Right now 64bit isn't needed by me personally, and I feel that the future in larger libraries will come from smart developers using DEF, etc. when recording their samples, instead of the old 30GB libraries which only seem to justify their prices by cost.
    WOW, What a great post! It all makes sense, appreciate your input.
    Thanks

  4. #4

    Wink Re: Quad or Core Duo

    JimmyV

  5. #5

    Re: Quad or Core Duo

    Yep! Scope always does great knowledgeable posts whenever I can follow. Love that one. I had guessed some time ago that Midi over Lan might work better for me than perhaps a Duo or Quad. At least until they get enough support for it to make it practical. As I have several plug-ins it would be nice to be able to access them all without hassle. That's why the idea of the 8gig x64 machines got my attention.
    -Rajay
    Sonar6PE,GS3Orch,GVI,Reason3.0,Batt.3,StylusRMX w/Exp,Trilogy,B4ll,VGuitar2,TranslatorPro,CoolEditPr o2.1, K2500XL,2xIBMM51P4530HT/80GBSATA/3GBDDR/350watts,2xWD149GBFW,Delta1010,MidiTimepieceAV,2x1 604,20/20,on & on..........

  6. #6

    Re: Quad or Core Duo

    It appears that Gigastudio 4 will take full advantage of multiple cores.

    I am anxious for a it's release. To run several instances of GigaPulse, and house VSTi's and VST FX, we will surely need it.
    JimmyV

  7. #7

    Question Re: Quad or Core Duo

    Well I just got to witness some benchmarks using iTunes, Lame, and Nuendo.

    The DAW used the ancient, but quality sounding CW DSP card, ( Scope Project 6DSP's ) and this is actually a video DAW for archiving.

    He assured me that quad core CPU's were unnecessary for audio. When I told him that many guys claimed to see huge gains he begged to differ, and finally proved his point to me.

    The quads actually show better gains in a couple of his Avid video apps., but for audio benchs, the quads at stock speeds showed no higher scores than the the noble E6850. This little buggar is cheap, and can be OC'd to make gains in the amounts of VSTi's and VST FX being used. I figured his Nuendo demo could be considered a real world example.

    Here's the deal, the current optimisations on most audio apps. can only go so far. In the case of Nuendo, when he overclocked his Asus P35 w/ the E6850, he took it up incrementally until the amount of gains ( instances of VSTi's, MIDI tracks, etc. ) started to diminish. This happened at 3.34GHz. The E6850 comes stock @ 3.0GHz. This jump doesn't seem like alot, but the F.S.B., and L2 cache seemed to allow this according to the results he showed me.

    This is actually great news. The CPU actually had much more headroom left, but once the results started diminishing, he said that the stability w/ the apps, would increase. I have no idea how the 45nm CPU's will fare w/ GS4, and VST hosts. But I now know that if I get that combination, it won't be until next summer.

    For now, it's another Core 2 Duo CPU, the E6850, and the DFI P35 Blood Iron ( meat and potatoes ) motherboard. I can easily take my DDR2 and switch it over, but now can tweak it in the BIOS of the DFI to run at CL3.

    Even if Giga will use the 4 core's in GS4, I already load 20 + large libraries in GVI w/ a lowly E6700. I do wish to use 28 - 32 large libraries, so this might work, I will let you know.

    I have had great sucess by eliminating uneeded layers in certain instuments, where I noticed no difference in their playability. This technique will be used when resources necessitate that. 16 layers of piano samples ? Please. I do not even notice a difference when I deleted these down to 8 or 10. Hopefully DEF will continue to give us more articulations, and less of these " needed layers ". The learngigastudio DVD's were quite useful for this surgical approach.

    The Intel E6700 w/ the Intel DP965LT worked flawlessley since it's release 14 months ago. I have never upgraded so quickly before, but it appears my friend has convinced me to do this in late December.

    Anyone wanting a stable audio friendly chipset / CPU combo, the 965 has worked like a dog w/o a single crash. I shall mourn it's demise in December.


    Here is a good reputable overclocking guru who calls 'em like he see's 'em.




    Conclusion

    By dropping the price of the youngest quad-core processor below $300, Intel made a great gift for hardware enthusiasts. Our today’s test session revealed that this processor can really do great in skillful hands. The overclocking potential of the Core 2 Quad Q6600 processor based on the new G0 core stepping is quite sufficient to help it compete successfully in almost any applications.
    According to our tests and numerous overclockers’ reports online, quad-core Core 2 Quad Q6600 processors can overclock up to 3.6GHz with proper air-cooling. In this case they can perform better than Core 2 Duo CPUs overclocked to their maximum. Moreover, we see this tendency even in those applications that are not optimized for multi-core processors and that are getting fewer day by day. As we saw there are very few tasks left, where overclocked quad-core processors cannot outperform overclocked dual-core CPUs. They defeat their rivals not only thanks to twice as many computational cores, but also thanks to twice as large L2 cache.
    So, we think Core 2 Quad Q6600 seems to be a much more attractive offering these days than Core 2 Duo E6850.
    However, those computer users who do not want to mess with processor overclocking may think differently. In this case Core 2 Duo E6850 with 25% higher clock speed performs better in a lot of applications, including games. Moreover, it is also more economical. As a result, the most optimal choice for a system working at nominal speeds would depends a lot on the type of tasks it is intended for.
    Nevertheless, we shouldn’t forget that most upcoming applications and games are being designed with multi-threading in mind. That is why Core 2 Quad Q6600 may be a more promising solution even if used in its nominal mode.



    We only need Tascam to give us a heads up on exactly how many threads Gigastudio 4 can support. GVI appeared to handle 2 threads, as the quad showed little difference. But if GS4 gets optimised like many apps ( Lame for one ), it would be really helpful for us guys who wish to prepare for battle. Either way, us Giga guys will be covered as these CPU's tested above are both cheap and very fast.

    My main concern is how many libraries I can load, and this is a memory subsystem issue, not just RAM. Large L2 cache, and 16MB HDD cache is also helpful.


    While I'm Young.
    JimmyV

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