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Topic: [OT] composer vs union question.

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  1. #1

    [OT] composer vs union question.

    so i just got hired to score a film. i will be writing, performing, and recording the entire thing myself for a set fee (plus retention of writing/publishing rights, and maybe a royalty on the back end). so as an afm member how exactly do i set this up? i suppose technically i'll be subcontracting myself to do the performing but it seems pointless to do so, especially if i end up in a situation where i have to do a bunch of paperwork to keep paying myself residuals. i'm tempted to just ignore the whole thing. anyone have experience with this?

  2. #2

    Re: [OT] composer vs union question.

    A number of composers have the producers of a film sign a union agreement, then perform on their own scores, as a kind of back-end payment. You should contact the AFM to see how this would be set up. Be aware that it doens't happen automatically - your producers will need to agree to union stipulations and payments.

  3. #3

    Re: [OT] composer vs union question.

    i'm tempted to just ignore the whole thing. anyone have experience with this?

    I am member of AFoM Local 149 Toronto Canada.

    At the begining of my career I couldn't be bothered with the contracts.
    But now, I wouldn't even think about doing a Film score without a contract
    for the folliwng reasons:

    1) You have the security of the Union protecting you in the event of non-payment
    2) You can contribute to your pension
    3) The Film Company sees you as a professional
    4) The Union sees you as a working professional and thats good press
    5) If you have to do overdubs, you can hire the best cats in town
    to play on our score and demand total pro performance from them
    6) You also feel totally profesional about the project

    Your royalties are a seperate deal. In Canada, a total electronic score
    is contracted as as an Electronic Music Score at 300/hour with a 4 hour call.
    So you can work that part out as your costs to perform the project. For example, if youre being paid 10,000 for the entire job, you can say 5000
    would be paid to you the studio musician and 5,000 is your creative fee.
    The employer would have to pay the work dues (2%) and Penison (10%).
    Royalties are paid to you through your performing rights society.
    Hope that helps,
    Allan

  4. #4

    Re: [OT] composer vs union question.

    i'm tempted to just ignore the whole thing. anyone have experience with this?

    I am member of AFoM Local 149 Toronto Canada.

    At the begining of my career I couldn't be bothered with the contracts.
    But now, I wouldn't even think about doing a Film score without a contract
    for the folliwng reasons:

    1) You have the security of the Union protecting you in the event of non-payment
    2) You can contribute to your pension
    3) The Film Company sees you as a professional
    4) The Union sees you as a working professional and thats good press
    5) If you have to do overdubs, you can hire the best cats in town
    to play on our score and demand total pro performance from them
    6) You also feel totally profesional about the project

    Your Union will help you fill out the contract. Your royalties are a seperate deal. Film Companies are vultures and try to get your publishing. Don't let them if possible.

    In Canada, a total electronic score
    is contracted as as an Electronic Music Score at 300/hour with a 4 hour call.
    If this is the same in Seattle, you can work that part out as your costs to perform the project. For example, if youre being paid 10,000 for the entire job, you can say 5000 would be paid to you the studio musician and 5,000 is your creative fee.
    The employer would have to pay the work dues (2%) and Penison (10%).
    Royalties are paid to you through your performing rights society.
    Hope that helps,
    Allan

  5. #5

    Re: [OT] composer vs union question.

    Quote Originally Posted by akane
    In Canada, a total electronic score
    is contracted as as an Electronic Music Score at 300/hour with a 4 hour call.
    If this is the same in Seattle, you can work that part out as your costs to perform the project.
    on union jobs i've done in the past they have me separate out every sound as its own instrument even if i'm doing it all on computer. that's handy for making a few extra dollars off of ad agencies, but in this case i need to keep the numbers as predictable as possible for the sake of the producers.

  6. #6

    Re: [OT] composer vs union question.

    Its the same thing. Thats how you proceed if your professional.

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