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Topic: Hints for users of Noteworthy Composer (and other notation software?)

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  1. #1

    Hints for users of Noteworthy Composer (and other notation software?)

    As a Noteworthy Composer user new to GPO, I'm discovering some handy hints and tricks that work well in Noteworthy, and might be applicable to some other notation programs, although I can't be sure of how "portable" these techniques are.

    To begin with, to produce good performance dynamics requires a lot of manipulation of the mod wheel CC1 values. Working on the score to the first movement of Beethoven's Sixth symphony as my "training piece", I have discovered what I think might be the best way to insert detailed CC1 and velocity controls into the performance.

    For each instrument create an extra staff placed immediately below the instrument staff, and assign this to the same Garritan Studio channel as the instrument staff. For example, immediately below the staff labeled "Violins I" I add a staff labeled "Violins I KS and CC". Even though the first violins are in the treble clef I put this extra staff in the bass clef and in the midi properties mark it as transposed -12. That way the KS (Key Switch) note values map into the clef in easily readable positions. For example, "F" for Pizz maps to the high F of the bass clef in the transposed control staff, and is quickly Identifiable as "F", as opposed to having it extended way below the staff by some number of lines that have to be counted to figure out what the KS note is. (KS notes can also be annotated using the "edit Lyrics" command for the controller staff to add text like "KS for Pizz" under the note itself.)

    Next, fill the entire control staff with measures filled with short valued rests consistent with the note values of the piece. For example, in Beethoven 6 mv 1 (in 2/4) I fill the entire control staff with eighth rests.

    Now I can place MPC controllers between any two rests. (Noteworthy's "Multi-Point Controller" allows any CC, including CC1 mod wheel to be given a single absolute value or a linear sweep over a range of values for a specified time period). In some cases, where the controller value needs to be adjusted just slightly before the note is hit to avoid sudden "jumps" during the first few microseconds of the attack, you can split the 1/16th rest in the controller staff into two 1/32 rests and put the controller value 1/32 before the note is played.

    A couple of advantages of this is method are 1) the mod wheel values stand out from the clutter of notes, 2) A controller measure can be copied and pasted into a later spot in the same staff or at a matching spot in another instrument's staff allowing the dynamic contour of a single measure or an entire passage to be duplicated into other measures even when those two measures have completely different sequences of notes. Only the CC1 values are copy-pasted. So when the oboe takes the melody line from the strings, the oboe can be given a copy of the string's CC1 contours for the whole passage with a single copy and paste. 3) If at some later date you wish to "enrich" the string section, for example, by adding a couple layered solo instruments you can copy-paste the entire controller staff from the section instrument staff into the solo instrument staff so that the newly added solo instrument follows the same performance dynamics of the section staff.

    In Noteworthy, note velocities are governed by the usual dynamic marks (pp, p, mp, mf, ...), and their default velocity values can be overridden for intermediate velocities. Place your dynamic notations between the note staff and the controller staff for maximum visibility. Here's an example from Beethoven's 6th mv 1, first violins:



    I'll add more tips as I discover more ways to use Noteworthy Composer with GPO.

    --gary shannon
    --gary shannon
    Spooks! - The Movie

  2. #2

    Re: Hints for users of Noteworthy Composer (and other notation software?)

    I think that's an excellent idea! I have been struggling for a sensible way of doing this for a while, and I will use this one.

    My only observation would be that on the KS/CC staff, I would be inclined to move the rests up, then remove the "preserve width" attribute on the Multi Point Controller. That way both the rest and the MPC are readable, and both kept within the staff boundaries.

    The advantage of doing this is seen clearly when printing the score (having surpressed the printing of the KS/CC staff, of course).

    Rob.

  3. #3

    Re: Hints for users of Noteworthy Composer (and other notation software?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Elliott
    I think that's an excellent idea! I have been struggling for a sensible way of doing this for a while, and I will use this one.

    My only observation would be that on the KS/CC staff, I would be inclined to move the rests up, then remove the "preserve width" attribute on the Multi Point Controller. That way both the rest and the MPC are readable, and both kept within the staff boundaries.

    The advantage of doing this is seen clearly when printing the score (having surpressed the printing of the KS/CC staff, of course).

    Rob.
    Good idea. I'll try that.

    --gary shannon
    --gary shannon
    Spooks! - The Movie

  4. #4

    Re: Hints for users of Noteworthy Composer (and other notation software?)

    Quote Originally Posted by fiziwig
    As a Noteworthy Composer user new to GPO, I'm discovering some handy hints and tricks that work well in Noteworthy, and might be applicable to some other notation programs, although I can't be sure of how "portable" these techniques are.

    To begin with, to produce good performance dynamics requires a lot of manipulation of the mod wheel CC1 values. Working on the score to the first movement of Beethoven's Sixth symphony as my "training piece", I have discovered what I think might be the best way to insert detailed CC1 and velocity controls into the performance.

    For each instrument create an extra staff placed immediately below the instrument staff, and assign this to the same Garritan Studio channel as the instrument staff. For example, immediately below the staff labeled "Violins I" I add a staff labeled "Violins I KS and CC". Even though the first violins are in the treble clef I put this extra staff in the bass clef and in the midi properties mark it as transposed -12. That way the KS (Key Switch) note values map into the clef in easily readable positions. For example, "F" for Pizz maps to the high F of the bass clef in the transposed control staff, and is quickly Identifiable as "F", as opposed to having it extended way below the staff by some number of lines that have to be counted to figure out what the KS note is. (KS notes can also be annotated using the "edit Lyrics" command for the controller staff to add text like "KS for Pizz" under the note itself.)

    Next, fill the entire control staff with measures filled with short valued rests consistent with the note values of the piece. For example, in Beethoven 6 mv 1 (in 2/4) I fill the entire control staff with eighth rests.

    Now I can place MPC controllers between any two rests. (Noteworthy's "Multi-Point Controller" allows any CC, including CC1 mod wheel to be given a single absolute value or a linear sweep over a range of values for a specified time period). In some cases, where the controller value needs to be adjusted just slightly before the note is hit to avoid sudden "jumps" during the first few microseconds of the attack, you can split the 1/16th rest in the controller staff into two 1/32 rests and put the controller value 1/32 before the note is played.

    A couple of advantages of this is method are 1) the mod wheel values stand out from the clutter of notes, 2) A controller measure can be copied and pasted into a later spot in the same staff or at a matching spot in another instrument's staff allowing the dynamic contour of a single measure or an entire passage to be duplicated into other measures even when those two measures have completely different sequences of notes. Only the CC1 values are copy-pasted. So when the oboe takes the melody line from the strings, the oboe can be given a copy of the string's CC1 contours for the whole passage with a single copy and paste. 3) If at some later date you wish to "enrich" the string section, for example, by adding a couple layered solo instruments you can copy-paste the entire controller staff from the section instrument staff into the solo instrument staff so that the newly added solo instrument follows the same performance dynamics of the section staff.

    In Noteworthy, note velocities are governed by the usual dynamic marks (pp, p, mp, mf, ...), and their default velocity values can be overridden for intermediate velocities. Place your dynamic notations between the note staff and the controller staff for maximum visibility. Here's an example from Beethoven's 6th mv 1, first violins:



    I'll add more tips as I discover more ways to use Noteworthy Composer with GPO.

    --gary shannon
    Gary what does "{mpc.mod-wheel}" mean and what does it do? Also what is the function of the rest? I'm wondering if anyone using Finale has tried this type of method. This would be the equivalent of an E.T. speaking a language and draw a diagram of a map through the universe using nano points of light!

    Samantha Penigar
    http://www.myspace.com/samanthapenigar

    http://www.northernsounds.com/forum/...p?userid=13306

    Dream it! Then Do it! Good things come to those who work while they wait. [COLOR=purple]Persistence[/COLO

  5. #5

    Re: Hints for users of Noteworthy Composer (and other notation software?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Samantha Penigar


    Gary what does "{mpc.mod-wheel}" mean and what does it do? Also what is the function of the rest? I'm wondering if anyone using Finale has tried this type of method. This would be the equivalent of an E.T. speaking a language and draw a diagram of a map through the universe using nano points of light!

    Samantha,

    MPC is "Multi Point Controller". In noteworthy that's how to insert midi controller commands. When you click on that and edit it you get a dialog box that shows you what controller value to use that that point.

    The rests are there to make sure the midi controller gets applied at the correct place in the measure. In other words, the controller staff needs to keep pace with the music staff so it has to have rests so it doesn't get ahead of the music.

    --gary shannon
    --gary shannon
    Spooks! - The Movie

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