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Topic: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

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  1. #1
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    CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    Written for a young Concert Band. Limited range and easier rhythm patterns. For all of you small school or Middle school Directors, does this keep your interest.
    Gary

    hi-fi URL: http://www.soundclick.com/util/getpl...d=5855268&q=hi

    This recording has the quality of a "fair" Middle school Band-slightly out of balance and out of tune....wierd!
    Last edited by garymosse; 10-09-2007 at 05:55 PM. Reason: not working

  2. #2
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    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    As I listen I can imagine young players doing this – as you said, out of tune, out of balance and a little awkward. As far as keeping interest, it’s as good as anything the concert band I was in when I was at this level and better than most. You seem to demand more from the percussionists than anybody else. It was fun, maybe a little painful, listening.
    Trent P. McDonald

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    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    Thanks for listening, Trent.
    Drummers-uh..percussionist can develop these skills a little fasterbecause they don't have to wait for embouchures to develop. Still, it would require a dedicated player.
    Gary

  4. #4

    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    Gary's right. I don't think the difficulty in percussion on this piece would necessarily be each individual part, but rather, getting your percussionists to play together. Counting with ease is a difficult thing for middle school percussionists (at least where I went to middle school). Still, a very authentic sound!

  5. #5

    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    I started in a concert band at age 12 in percussion while I was learning to get my first reasonable notes out of a baritone. We had more percussion that anything else, and I would have loved to have taken part in this. Although I believe we would have really struggled with the rhythm - not perhaps each individual part, but the interplay would have confused us. At age 12, I was still easily distracted by what everyone else was doing!

    The ending sounded a little abrupt for my taste, although it would work well if it was to lead straight in to a second movement.

    An enjoyable listen - thanks for sharing!

    Owen

  6. #6
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    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    Thanks for listening, Sanyaren.
    My experience with Middle School Drummers: they can either be very motivated & together, or they can be the source of constant noise.
    Individually, each part is easy. It takes time to coordinate parts and give
    the chime & cymbal and tymp the confidence to enter in time.
    Gary

  7. #7
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    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    Hi Owen, thanks for listening.
    One of the most critical parts of beginning band is convincing students to
    start on instruments which lead to a balanced instrumenrtation.
    If you allow students to pick what they want to play without any guidence, the
    Band would have flutes, clarinets, 20 alto/tenor saxes.trumpets. and 20 drums-only snare & bass, no keyboards,etc. Hard to find music for this group.
    I always helped students find an instrument they could play based on
    size & shape of teeth; length of fingers; making a good sound on mouthpiece;
    because students only practice if they suceed in making a good sound.
    After achieving a relative balance of all instruments, the remaining students could tryout for percussion and had to display coordination and a good feeling for the beat. New band students don't really know what they want to play. That's what the BD has to help them with.
    Gary

  8. #8

    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    How disturbingly realistic! All that you are missing are a few clarinet and alto sax squeeks and you've got it!

    Aside from the difficult percussion part there seems to be a lot of syncopation which might throw off most middle school level bands as well.

    Playable perhaps, but difficult for most middle school level bands. Perhaps a little reworking to make the wind parts more difficult (up to the level of the percussion) so that it could be a low-level high school piece might work out better?

  9. #9
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    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    Thanks for listening Alynn.
    You may be right about the syncopation. I usually found that syncopation
    which was not in consecutive measures was OK, but I will look again.
    Gary

  10. #10

    Re: CHANGING LANDSCAPES for Band

    Cool sound--also great that you give several of the "kids" solos. Very interesting--the beginning almost reminds me Webern (of course you go on for > 18 seconds)
    Modern but not in a way that would scare away the kids
    Great piece!

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