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Topic: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

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  1. #1

    Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    I got thinking recently about this industry. Specifically how small it appears, although there are a vast amount of companies and individuals that fit in somewhere along the line, somewhere in the background so to speak.

    Whilst it would be really impossible to give the nod to any one developer, there are only a handful that have provided us with the best of the best.

    Naturaly one must consider the quality of the library, as well as usability and after sales service/support.

    The leading ones that come to my mind are as follows-

    VSL
    East West
    Sonivox
    Gary Garritan
    Miroslav vitous
    Peter Siedlaczek
    Kirk Hunter
    Dan Dean

    Now, most are current. I included Miroslav and Peter Siedlaczek because their contributions require no explanation. There are others that have released excellent libraries but not all developers cover the complete orchestral pallette, such as Westagte studios who produce some of the best woodwinds and brass I've ever heard.

    So, my vote for the number one developer goes to......... Gary Garritan.
    Why?

    Well, there isn't another developer out there that combines passion for the industry, gives their free time on sites such as this one, offers so much training and resources and offers the best after sales service bar none.

    When you purchase a Garritan product like I have you get a sense of being part of a community and somehow belonging to something special. I have not gotten that from another developer but will say that Kirk Hunter is worth mentioning along these lines also.

    Whilst GPO isn't the highest end library, GOS WAS groundbreaking and holds up today with the best of them.
    GPO HAS however provided us with the tools to make realistic arrangements at an affordable price point and has such a huge following and rightly so.

    Thank you Gary for your contributions........

  2. #2

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    I would agree that Garritan is the most influential orchestral sample developer at this time.

    While I personally do not like the sound of GPO (but I know many others here do), he has the ease of use and low price point down pat as well as the fact that his product is so integrated into Finale and Sibelius and bundled with them and other top notation packages. It's exactly the same strategy Microsoft used to get Internet Explorer seeded way back when, packaging it with Windows, and that was a very smart move.

    And I also agree that Gary's top notch community involvement and free courses help people a lot who are starting out with sample libraries, and that that has made a very positive impression of him and his company upon many sample users, even those that do not use his products.

  3. #3

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    Quote Originally Posted by Von Richter
    Interesting thread! However your list is missing a lot of the important stuff. There is no way to pick just one, especially since innovation and influence are not mutually exclusive. I'll try to be accurate to the best of my knowledge below.

    *Mellotron.
    Widely used, famous orchestral "analog samples", well predating the rest of this stuff.

    *David Vorhaus, for digitizing the famous "Orch5" sample for the Fairlight digital synths. Likely the most influential single orchestral sample in history.. The rest of the Fairlight orchestral library was massively innovative and set an early high standard for sampling despite it's limited hardware. It would be a mistake to underestimate the Fairlight... it was all over the place, including many very convincing orchestral soundtrack "mock-ups" some of which still sound better than what people do now.

    *Peter S. As far as I know, "The Orchestra" (not Advanced Orchestra) is the first "distant miced" library. Not immediately influential, perhaps, but certainly long predating other libraries similarily sampled. Some of it ended up in the hugely widespread Roland library as well.

    *EMU and Roland. In particular, the Rompler versions of these libraries, found in the EMU Proteus/2, and the Roland JV880 Orch card, were hugely influential. The EMU and Roland samples were everywhere. Heck I still hear them popping up.

    *Miroslav. It may seem quaint now, but it was a huge raising of the bar at the time. The first true modern library, with everything sampled in place, in the same hall, with uniform ambience and a good selection of articulations.

    *Garritan Orchestral Strings, Garritan Personal Orchestra. Both hugely influential for precisely opposite reasons. GOS is the first truly "deluxe", relentlessly sampled library. GPO on the opposite end finally puts a good orchestral sample set into the hands of the average Joe. Both of these products have major reprecussions for every orchestral sample product released since.

    I agree. Guess I was focused on current stuff mainly. Peter Siedlaczek was the most popular library at a time so I included it as I did include Miroslav.

  4. #4

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    I use many libraries... .

    My first library, when I have an idea in my head and want to record it, it is always Gary Garritan`s GPO!

    I don`t know another library that is soooo easy to use, and with it you can get so good results in the shortest time... .

    Just my 2 cents

    Gunther
    "Music is the shorthand of emotion." Leo Tolstoy

    Listen to me, tuning my triangle http://www.box.net/shared/ae822u6r3i

  5. #5

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    VSL. I own almost every library by every developer but what VSL did for orchestral sampled instruments rocketed the technology ahead by years.

    My opinion of course.

  6. #6

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    Quote Originally Posted by davecos
    VSL. I own almost every library by every developer but what VSL did for orchestral sampled instruments rocketed the technology ahead by years.

    My opinion of course.
    There is no doubt that what Herb has done with VSL is astonishing to say the least. Perhaps it is indeed the most acurate and in depth library ever produced, as a complete bundle if we look at the VI set, there is nothing out there that IS as good or complete.

    I will also add that they are constantly improving, evolving and appear to be investing in a product that will no doubt grow over the next few years.

    However, I would like to see them offering more training resources and perhaps more of a direct link with their customer base.
    Not much goes on at their web site and with all their glory they are well behind Garritan in offering customer interaction and with such a massive and expensive offering they should provide it.

    I may buy more of their products, maybe not but when gary releases HIS new GPO 2 or whatever will replace GOS I WILL buy it. It WILL be good, a fair price and I WILL get the support I need, perhaps even a personal thank you from Gary himself.

    What this has to do with being influencial I don't know but my original point I believe is understood.

    I do however take my hat off to Herb also........

  7. #7

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    UPDATED:

    Interesting thread! However your list is missing a lot of the important stuff. There is no way to pick just one, especially since innovation and influence are not mutually exclusive. I'll try to be accurate to the best of my knowledge below.

    *Mellotron.
    Widely used, famous orchestral "analog samples", well predating the rest of this stuff. Possibly the earliest example of "sample start offset" legato! (If you got that joke, high five!)

    *David Vorhaus, for digitizing the famous "Orch5" sample for the Fairlight digital synths. Likely the most influential single orchestral sample in history.. The rest of the Fairlight orchestral library was massively innovative and set an early high standard for sampling despite it's limited hardware. It would be a mistake to underestimate the Fairlight... it was all over the place, including many very convincing orchestral soundtrack "mock-ups" some of which still sound better than what people do now.

    *Peter S. As far as I know, "The Orchestra" (not Advanced Orchestra) is the first "distant miced" library. Not immediately influential, perhaps, but certainly long predating other libraries similarily sampled. Some of it ended up in the hugely widespread Roland library as well. I would consider great libraries like Project Sam, Sonic Implants and EWQLSO descendents of this sampling philosophy.

    *EMU and Roland. In particular, the Rompler versions of these libraries, found in the EMU Proteus/2, and the Roland JV880 Orch card, were hugely influential. The EMU and Roland samples were everywhere. Heck I still hear them popping up.

    *Miroslav. It may seem quaint now, but it was a huge raising of the bar at the time. With everything sampled in place, in the same hall, with uniform ambience and a good selection of articulations.

    *Garritan Orchestral Strings, Garritan Personal Orchestra. Both hugely influential for precisely opposite reasons. GOS is the first truly "deluxe", relentlessly sampled "siege tactic" library. It also pioneered standards now taken for granted like auto-alternation and offset-legato. GPO on the opposite end finally puts a good orchestral sample set into the hands of the average Joe. Both of these products have major reprecussions for every orchestral sample product released since.

    *Project Sam. For the multiple mic distances. Someone correct me if they were not the first to market with this simple yet fantastic feature.

    *VSL for sampled legato. The only direct influence of the technique that comes to mind is the newer Westgate stuff, although apparently some new EWQL stuff also features sampled legato. (Don't quote me on that). On the other hand, nobody has imitated VSL's unique recording approach, and I doubt anyone will before traditional sampling is obsolete.

    If someone can tell me who was the first to market with orchestral release samples, I'll add that to the list above, as it was indeed a very influential feature.

    NOTE: this thread seems to have already become yet another "popularity contest", so I should clarify that I'm not making any judgements of the quality of products by their omission or inclusion.

  8. #8

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    I'll agree with the choice of Garritan, but for perhaps a different reason:

    It's not only the sample library...it's also the community and the emphasis on music education.
    Nobody has been as concerned about people learning music as Gary has.
    That's gotta be worth something!

    Jim
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  9. #9

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    Quote Originally Posted by snorlax
    I'll agree with the choice of Garritan, but for perhaps a different reason:

    It's not only the sample library...it's also the community and the emphasis on music education.
    Nobody has been as concerned about people learning music as Gary has.
    That's gotta be worth something!

    Jim
    Well, that was kinda what I was saying.........
    He is in a class all by himself.

  10. #10

    Re: Most Influencial ORCHESTRAL Sample developer- Your vote

    My choice would be Garritan or VSL.

    What Gary did with GOS inspired much of what current day sample libraries are today.

    VSL have also been a big recent inspiration to current day libraries. They took what Gary started, ran with it and vastly improved upon it. Add to that they have maintained the capacity to be in the lead terms of innovation and quality.

    So it's a tough choice. In all fairness I would go for Garritan seeing as GOS is the father of the modern sample library.

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