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Topic: any mocker uppers out there?

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  1. #1

    any mocker uppers out there?

    I\'m just curious from some of you people who do Film score mockups. How much time is usually involved? I\'m working on some orch. mock ups for a guy right now. He wants me to play a few parts and then he\'s adding some live instruments on top. The time he wants me to spend on it doesn\'t seem like enough to do a good job. If I do it in the time I have available, it sounds aweful, if I make it sound good, it takes too much time! Ahhh. So I\'m curious how much time you guys usually spend on a cue. Thanks!

  2. #2

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    I scored a 4 minute cue from the silent movie called Metropolis for my band project about 2 years ago. It took me about 2 and a half weeks to finish it all up the way I wanted it! It was only my 2nd project, though, so that\'s why it took a long time.

  3. #3

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    I wonder how people capture the chords
    with there ears . Like a chord played with
    strings or choir etc.
    There`s no hope for people who don`t have perfect pitch .
    I was trying to mock up a few score`s in Crimson Tide , but failed .
    I tried a few scores in it and I could get the
    theme ( melodies ) by sitting with my keyboard for a long time
    trying to find the right note . Pushing C ,thats not it , pushing G,
    thats not it .......But when trying to get the chord parts , I thought its impossible .
    (For example the Choir inTr.2 or
    the String blocks in Tr.1 that starts from about
    3:37 or the brass chords before this and theres alot more )

    If you don`t have perfect pitch and
    get the chords or get the theme (melody)
    by just hearing it once , how did you train your ears ? Are there any training method`s ?

    Thanks in advance .


    Veron

  4. #4

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    Hi, Veron:

    Perfect pitch is not necessary to transcribe music by ear. Some have said that having perfect pitch is, in fact, a curse.

    Rather, you can develop your ear with intervallic training methods that will allow you to immediately recognize the intervals between notes---that is: half steps, hole steps, thirds, fourths, fifths, etc., and copy down what you hear in a relative way without knowing the exact pitch. Later, you can determine a starting note by sitting down at a piano, for instance, and finding that note. This training will also teach you to recognize most common chords and help figure out the more complicated ones.

    There are ear training methods with CDs for self study that can be purchased at music stores. However, you may find it more effective to hire a music teacher who will give lessons and homework. That\'s because a teacher can vary the lesson plan to help you master the areas that give you the most trouble---a CD can\'t. Oh, and you can\'t cheat on a teacher, like you can with a CD [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

    Also ask about sight singing lessons. This teaches you to hear and sing right from sheet music while being given nothing more than a starting pitch.

    Basic training requires a couple of months for each at one lesson per week. Advanced study can take an additional year, or longer. Alot depends on your ability, but you can learn how to do it.

    It helps if you know how to play an instrument---piano, especially. So consider some basic piano lessons if you are weak in that area.

    Developing both of these skills will eventually enable you to compose with just pencil, paper and your brain. And that comes in handy when inspiration strikes when you are miles away from your computer.

    John

  5. #5

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    Hi, J. Whaley:

    When I first got started---10 months back---it was taking me about 40-60 minutes per rendered track minute. So a three minute tune with 20 tracks took between 40-60 hours. I don\'t know if that\'s fast or slow in comparison to others---and I\'m still a novice compared to many on this forum.

    That time is dropping as I develop more useful articulations and macros to suit the way I write. So if stick with the sample library articulations---and for the most part I\'m don\'t as most of the demos you will hear here have substantially altered articulations---that time drops to 20-30 minutes. Most of the stuff is programmed, some is played. I am equally clumsy at both so, for me, there is no time advantage in either approach.

    Would like to hear some metrics from the pros.

    John

  6. #6

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    Thomas_J was saying in another thread that 2 or 3 minutes of fully orchestrated music in one day was normal for a good composer.

    I almost fainted when I heard that! I spent 2 weeks writing and 2 days mocking up the last piece I posted here, and it was just over one minute!

    Crazy!

  7. #7

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    Hi, Leon:

    Yeah, I think one can get to that level of proficiency. It won\'t happen overnight. Takes some talent, devotion and a lot of woodshedding.

    Did he mention how much time was invested and devoted prior to getting to that level?

    Gotta keep it all in perspective.

    John

  8. #8

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    Originally posted by johnkay:
    hole steps
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Uh, meant to say \"whole\" steps.

    Hole steps must be those unplayed notes in a whole tone scale [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

    John

  9. #9

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    Originally posted by Leon Willett:
    Thomas_J was saying in another thread that 2 or 3 minutes of fully orchestrated music in one day was normal for a good composer.

    I almost fainted when I heard that! I spent 2 weeks writing and 2 days mocking up the last piece I posted here, and it was just over one minute!

    Crazy!
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">John Williams writes 2 minutes of music a day and it is my understanding that he doesn\'t fully orchestrate.


    ------------
    Alex Cremers

  10. #10

    Re: any mocker uppers out there?

    There\'s an on going joke in #midi-mockup, that Thomas can compose/mockup orchestral music faster than real time [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    ex.

    a full hour long score takes him a half hour [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img] hehehe

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