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Topic: Linux Mint

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  1. #1

    Linux Mint

    I'm now using this Gutsy based distro on my main Linux PC, well worth a look. From their website;

    Linux Mint is one of the surprise packages of the past year. Originally launched as a variant of Ubuntu with integrated media codecs, it has now developed into one of the most user-friendly distributions on the market - complete with a custom desktop and menus, several unique configuration tools, a web-based package installation interface, and a number of different editions. Perhaps most importantly, this is one project where the developers and users are in constant interaction, resulting in dramatic, user-driven improvements with every new release. DistroWatch has spoken to the founder and lead developer of Linux Mint, Clement Lefebvre, about the history of the distribution.

    Link

  2. #2

    Re: Linux Mint

    Hi, Tony...

    Got Mint Elyssa up and running great on a P-IV laptop with 1 gig of RAM...all peacefully coexisting with XP pro in dual-boot nirvana.

    Got it to see all my network printers, including the one on the print server, via smb & lpd.

    Connection to internet was effortless, unlike my first try with Ubuntu.

    Now gotta get audio/MIDI apps going, like Lilypond, etc.

    Recommendations?

    BTW--the install routine simply gave up the search for FD0 and carried on.

    Thanx!
    Jim
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  3. #3

    Re: Linux Mint

    Congrats Jim on getting it up and running!

    Firstly you want to install JACK and Qjackctl - these are necessary to get proper audio / midi routing and low latency, you might also want to install the low latency kernel. Use the Synaptic package manager to search and automatically install these. The low latency kernel needs some tweaks to get working properly, lots of info here http://rt.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page

    Once that's all done you might want to consider some of these;

    Sequencers

    * MusE excellent Qt-based audio/MIDI sequencer from Werner Schweer and friends [2007]
    * Rosegarden audio/MIDI sequencer, notation editor, Csound-score producer, and more... [2008]

    Encoders

    * BladeEnc an MP3 encoder from Tord Jansson
    * LAME source code for an encoder licensed under the GPL

    Music Notation Editors

    * Canorus a new music notation program from Reinhard Katzmann & Crew - I met these guys earlier this year
    * LilyPond
    * MuseScore the MusE WYSIWYG music typesetter, more great software from Werner Schweer
    * NoteEdit an excellent Qt-based notation editor with output in LilyPond, MIDI, and MusicXML formats
    * Rosegarden score creation from MIDI input and MIDI sequencer, also exports Csound score file

    The Amarok player is excellent too http://amarok.kde.org/

    That should keep you going for a bit, let me know how you get on.

  4. #4

    Re: Linux Mint

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Monaghan View Post
    Congrats Jim on getting it up and running!

    Firstly you want to install JACK and Qjackctl - these are necessary to get proper audio / midi routing and low latency, you might also want to install the low latency kernel. Use the Synaptic package manager to search and automatically install these. The low latency kernel needs some tweaks to get working properly, lots of info here http://rt.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page
    I think it's probably enough to just install the low latency kernel from synaptic. At least that was what I did and it seems to work "out of the box". I don't think there is any need to manually tweak the kernel anymore with distros like Ubuntu and Fedora regarding low latency.
    Halvor


  5. #5

    Re: Linux Mint

    Quote Originally Posted by halvor View Post
    I think it's probably enough to just install the low latency kernel from synaptic. At least that was what I did and it seems to work "out of the box". I don't think there is any need to manually tweak the kernel anymore with distros like Ubuntu and Fedora regarding low latency.
    Halvor,
    Is that kernel easy to identify from Synaptic Pkg. Mgr.?

    I don't want to mess with the kernel too much since I am relatively new to Linux, and everything is running well now.

    BIGGER QUESTION: Since I do not "play live" do I need the new kernel? Most all of my work will be through notation and/or sequenced, so is a lower-latency kernel a real requirement?

    Thanx...Jim
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  6. #6

    Re: Linux Mint

    Quote Originally Posted by snorlax View Post
    Halvor,
    Is that kernel easy to identify from Synaptic Pkg. Mgr.?

    I don't want to mess with the kernel too much since I am relatively new to Linux, and everything is running well now.

    BIGGER QUESTION: Since I do not "play live" do I need the new kernel? Most all of my work will be through notation and/or sequenced, so is a lower-latency kernel a real requirement?

    Thanx...Jim

    I think you should search for "linux" and perhaps also "rt" (realtime) in synaptic. You will probably get a big bunch of kernels entitled something like "linux-2.6.25-i386-mumbojumbu" og something similar. Go for the one with the highest number in order to get the most recent kernel and make sure "rt" or "realtime" is included in the name. Then you just have to confirm the installation.

    At startup you would probably have a new entry for the realtime kernel in the bootmanager-screen, but it should be possible to select the old kernel if anything goes wrong.

    You actually don't have to install the realtime kernel if you are happy with running qjackctl and related program as "root" but that is not recommendable (although it shouldn't be more unsafe than running Win98 ). Low latency is only required if you really want to avoid things like clicks and dropouts in recordings and playback. It know it can actually have a negative impact on thinks like graphics performance, for instance.
    Halvor


  7. #7

    Re: Linux Mint

    Tony & Halvor...

    Kernel 2.6.24-21-rt installed. Now let me start to figure all this software out!!

    Thanx to both for the help!!

    Jim
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  8. #8

    Re: Linux Mint

    Quote Originally Posted by snorlax View Post
    Halvor,
    Is that kernel easy to identify from Synaptic Pkg. Mgr.?
    Just checked; I have installed one called "linux-image-2.6.24-19-rt". Kernels go under the term "linux-image". Make sure you also install the corresponding "modules" package, like
    "linux-ubuntu-modules-2.6.24-19-rt"
    Halvor


  9. #9

    Re: Linux Mint

    Got MuseScore to play back via JACK to the softsynth using one of the .SF2 soundfonts. Not sure why it needed JACK, though--I thought it would use ALSA.

    Still obviously a lot to learn here on my part! But MuseScore notation looks nice.

    Jim
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  10. #10

    Re: Linux Mint

    Quote Originally Posted by snorlax View Post
    Got MuseScore to play back via JACK to the softsynth using one of the .SF2 soundfonts. Not sure why it needed JACK, though--I thought it would use ALSA.

    Still obviously a lot to learn here on my part! But MuseScore notation looks nice.

    Jim
    You use the Jack audio server for connecting/routing the inputs and outputs of the different audio-applications. For instance; You could connect the "midi-out" from your keyboard(look in the "midi" tab in Qjackctl) to the input of a particular sf2-player like Qsynth. Then you could connect the audio output from the softsynth (this is shown in the "audio" tab in Qjackctl) to the alsa playback ("system" in qjackctl) in order the hear the actual sound.

    With Jack you can also control and finetune the latency, samplerate, bitrate of the audio much in the same way as you would in the ASIO control panel.

    Jack needs Alsa in order to produce any final sound though, so I guess you can say Alsa is more "low level" and Jack is working "on top" of it.
    Halvor


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