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Topic: The Road to Victory

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  1. #1

    The Road to Victory

    The Road to Victory





    This is the first movement of a 4 movement symphonic work I composed back in the spring of this year.

    This piece was written to show the emotions of going off to war, the last morning before the battle (2nd mvmt), the night before the battle (3rd mvmt) and then during the battle itself. When I composed this, I had in mind a Greek City/State, something in the line of Sparta.

    The first movement has our heroes joining ranks, and preparing to exit the city. The crowds fill the streets to cheer on the warriors as they march thru the city. As the warriors march thru the streets, a plethora of emotions are taking place. In the consonance are the upbeat, we’re going to win and we will be so proud but underneath these are the dissonance with the reminder to our heroes that they might not come back alive.

    This 1st movement is a study of these emotions as they march thru the streets and out of the gates of the city.

    Here is the MP3

    http://www.box.net/shared/gdp7nrmqkt

    When I composed this, I was limited in how many instruments my computer could handle. This is the reason there is no percussion in this movement. Any suggestions of types of percussion and where to be used would help at this point.

    Here is the link to the 1st movement, now with the added percussion

    http://www.box.net/shared/6llfgf9mo7

    Any other comments or suggestions would be appreciated as well.

    Thanks

    Ron

    I forgot to add that all instruments are GPO

  2. #2
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
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    Re: The Road to Victory

    Nice range of emotions/moods. There is a kind cheerful uneasiness that is very effective. You make the transitions nicely - one segues to the next quite effectively. The hymn-like section (stoic/brave/noble) is quite lovely. All in all, a nice ride of emotions.

    I can hear how percussion would really help; you do know that in Sib 5, you can record to audio even if your computer isn't up to playing it back? In other words, you can add percussion, if you so desire.
    Ron Pearl

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    ronaldmpearl.com

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    http://myspace.com/rmpearl

  3. #3

    Re: The Road to Victory

    This is very rich, Ron!

    Thanks for the text on the themes for this symphony. Lots of ideas you've worked with, full of emotions to plumb.

    Percussion ideas - Starting with simply having Snares synched to the marching passages is something to try. A more sparing use of Tympani to beef up the march when its most predominant in the piece, there's another simple idea.

    Considering that you were thinking of Spartans, a sprinkling of more primitive sounding percussion would be a worthy experiment also - sticks, tuned log drums.

    And I'm glad Ron Pearl gave you some info as a Sib user - That's the ticket, Ron, to render some instruments to audio as you go, to free up CPU power. That's what I have to do on a constant basis when working in Sonar. There's no way I can drive all the instruments in real time that I need as I work on a piece. As the music develops, I may need to re-render the tracks I've already bounced to audio - it's not that big of a hassle.

    I repeat, some very Rich work in this, Ron. Congrats.

    Randy B.
    (rbowser)

  4. #4

    Re: The Road to Victory

    I can see how percussion would give it juice, but at the same time, the winds and strings can have a naturally percussive effect. I think it stands alone quite well.
    A few frightening harmonies. The minor thing threw me off a bit (1/3 in). I think a subtle chord progression going into minor would have helped, just likeyou did in coming back to major, half way through the piece.
    Yours Truly,
    TubaJediMaster
    May the Fourth Be With You

    My demos:
    http://www.box.net/shared/ejtluyupfb

  5. #5

    Re: The Road to Victory

    Hi Ron,

    I really like the idea of this peice. You did a great job of matching the music to the emotion. I enjoyed the range of this piece as well.

    Julie

  6. #6

    Re: The Road to Victory

    Quote Originally Posted by rpearl
    Nice range of emotions/moods. There is a kind cheerful uneasiness that is very effective. You make the transitions nicely - one segues to the next quite effectively. The hymn-like section (stoic/brave/noble) is quite lovely. All in all, a nice ride of emotions.

    I can hear how percussion would really help; you do know that in Sib 5, you can record to audio even if your computer isn't up to playing it back? In other words, you can add percussion, if you so desire.
    Ron

    About 2 months ago, I got sib5 and found that if you have a very slow computer it really doesn't record to audio very well. There were still some misses and it would add about 4-20 minutes of empty measures on the end.

    About 3 weeks ago I finally got my new computer (dual core 3.0 chips w/4 gigs RAM) and have been going over all of my older pieces knowing that now I can add what i couldn't before. I took the memory out of the old and put it into the middle computer to bring it up to 1 gig ram w/ a 2.4 chip. That middle one still doesn't record as well as it should, but does okay for smaller projects.

    The ASO is going to perform up there in Baltimore in Dec. Opera singing which I am not into, but if you are, check them out. Thanks for the listen and the help.

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser-

    Percussion ideas - Starting with simply having Snares synched to the marching passages is something to try. A more sparing use of Tympani to beef up the march when its most predominant in the piece, there's another simple idea.

    Considering that you were thinking of Spartans, a sprinkling of more primitive sounding percussion would be a worthy experiment also - sticks, tuned log drums.


    Randy B.
    (rbowser)
    Randy

    Thanks as always.

    At first I was hesitant to ask for suggestions because I thought I knew what I was going to add. But I figured there is a ton of talent on this site and who knows?

    I love the idea of sticks, tuned log drums.
    I don't have those sounds yet, but you are right that they would fit into this perfectly. I think that those are what I 'hear' in my head already, but didn't realize that that was the case.

    Thank you again.

    Quote Originally Posted by tubajedimr
    I can see how percussion would give it juice, but at the same time, the winds and strings can have a naturally percussive effect. I think it stands alone quite well.
    A few frightening harmonies. The minor thing threw me off a bit (1/3 in). I think a subtle chord progression going into minor would have helped, just likeyou did in coming back to major, half way through the piece.
    Tuba

    I am happy that you think it stands alone without the percussion. I played with accents and marcatos to try to make it without the percussion, due to the limits of my old computer. I do think though that it will benefit from strategically placed percussion.


    Sometimes I change things a bit quickly and always try to watch out for that.

    Julie

    Thank you for the kind comments as well.


    Thanks again to all

    Ron

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Re: The Road to Victory

    I liked this. Although there are a variety of styles and ideas, I think it holds together pretty well.

    I agree that there should be percussion. Occasionally I heard some in my head, but I can’t tell you exactly where or what – I was enjoying listening and wasn’t watching timing or anything. I also think the percussion can be used to tie things together on those rare occasions when different sections begin to feel like totally different pieces of music.

    Overall, I really liked this.
    Trent P. McDonald

  8. #8

    Re: The Road to Victory

    Ron -

    I really enjoyed this. Compositionally, the music does seem to capture the feelings of walking on "the road to victory". I wish I can more accurately put into words what I feel when listening to this piece. rpearl described it the best for me. He eloquently described one general mood of this piece as "cheerful uneasiness". Yep! And your music, for me, skillfully captures that mood.

    With regards to the percussion. . . That's your call. This piece seems to stand well on its own. But could judicially orchestrated percussion help too? After listening to this piece, it seems that you have the compositional chops to make that determination.

    Ron - I come to this forum, in particular, because I know that I will find well composed and well orchestrated music here. I also come here to learn. The musical journey that you provide through this piece is no exception. I hope to hear the rest of the movements as you share them!

    Thank you!

    Ted
    Music and humor are healthy for the soul.

  9. #9

    Re: The Road to Victory

    Quote Originally Posted by trentpmcd
    I liked this. Although there are a variety of styles and ideas, I think it holds together pretty well.

    I agree that there should be percussion. Occasionally I heard some in my head, but I can’t tell you exactly where or what – I was enjoying listening and wasn’t watching timing or anything. I also think the percussion can be used to tie things together on those rare occasions when different sections begin to feel like totally different pieces of music.

    Overall, I really liked this.
    Trent

    Thank you. I have started with the percussion, but can't do much yet because finals are coming up quick.

    Quote Originally Posted by efiebke
    Ron -

    I really enjoyed this. Compositionally, the music does seem to capture the feelings of walking on "the road to victory". I wish I can more accurately put into words what I feel when listening to this piece. rpearl described it the best for me. He eloquently described one general mood of this piece as "cheerful uneasiness". Yep! And your music, for me, skillfully captures that mood.

    With regards to the percussion. . . That's your call. This piece seems to stand well on its own. But could judicially orchestrated percussion help too? After listening to this piece, it seems that you have the compositional chops to make that determination.

    Ron - I come to this forum, in particular, because I know that I will find well composed and well orchestrated music here. I also come here to learn. The musical journey that you provide through this piece is no exception. I hope to hear the rest of the movements as you share them!

    Thank you!

    Ted
    Ted

    I thought I knew pretty much everyone now who posts, so I was very surprised when I saw you comment on this. I went and listened to Pop Fusion Rock #1 to see who you are and am on my 3rd listen now. Great stuff!!

    I don't know how I missed this.The only thing I can figure is that I was studying for tests when it was up. I apologize for that, because I try not to miss any.

    Thanks for the great review!

    I have the second movement presentable and will work on getting the 3rd and 4th into GPO soon.

    Thanks again

    Ron

  10. #10

    Re: The Road to Victory

    Hello again, Ron

    I wanted to add something more on the subject of percussion.

    It's not as if it's mandatory that this piece should have percussion emphasizing the already strong rhythmic pulses. As several visitors have said, the marching quality which illustrates the theme is already clear.

    But considering your inspiration for the piece, drums and possibly other percussion instruments do seem appropriate, since martial music of all eras has included percussion. So when you're able to experiment with it, I'm here to just encourage you along those lines.

    One of my main reference books is "The Technique of Orchestration" by Kent Kennan and Donald Grantham. Here's a quote from that text's chapter on percussion:

    "...In this century and especially since 1960, the importance of the percussion section has increased enormously, along with the sophistication and complexity of music written for it. It is not too much to say that percussion instruments provide the 'characteristic sound' of a good deal of recent music and that composers consider that section equal in importance to the other sections of the orchestra..."

    I couldn't find the other quote I was hoping to find for this reply, but in another book somewhere on my shelf here, it's said that whenever there is a strong rhythmic texture in an orchestral piece, it "should" be reinforced with percussion. Obviously a statement of that author's preference and opinion, but an interesting point that is in agreement with the quote I placed above.

    I'm so impressed how with your busy schedule as a student, you're coming up with so much music!

    Randy B.
    (rbowser)

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