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Topic: I'd like your thoughts...

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  1. #1

    I'd like your thoughts...

    I'd like to know how you guys feel about stereo samples. They sound great when you load them up but some engineers don't like to work with them because they don't always mix well. What do you guys think and how do you prefer to work?

  2. #2

    Re: I'd like your thoughts...

    Hello,
    I recently converted all my VSL solo instruments to mono patches.
    It works very well and I don't have to reduce stereo width.

    If you think of recording an live orchestra you won't record every solo instrument with 2 microphones. So it's even more realistic and you have half of the sample weight in your system.

    Best,
    Justus
    rothermusic.de

  3. #3

    Re: I'd like your thoughts...

    Deleted. Poster has changed his original premise and my post no longer applies.

  4. #4

    Re: I'd like your thoughts...

    Mono is fine, but I use stereo and my engineer has no problems with it. I pan the "close" mic samples wherever I want them. Besides, at the risk of contradiction, when you record an orchestra it is never in mono. Even the sections have more than one microphone on them and when you bring up the close mics in a mix, you bring up more than one and they have their own stereo placement.

    Modern film music has turned all this 'religion' about the authentic positions of orchestral instruments on its ear anyway; people are recording more like a record session now, often splitting recording of brass, winds, strings, and percussion to get more control and dose with more effects. Some guys then are putting beautiful, live strings and brass through a lot of processing anyway, so it just isn't a matter of some kind of reproduction of Mahler or something (nice though Mahler is).

    Maybe you've heard Batman Returns (if you like film music) which uses all kinds of wacky combinations and effects with orchestral instruments. It was a collaboration between James Newton Howard and Hans Zimmer and in some ways is a great example of the best of two worlds AND interesting recording technique.
    Kind regards,

    John
    www.johngrahammusic.com

  5. #5

    Re: I'd like your thoughts...

    Besides, at the risk of contradiction, when you record an orchestra it is never in mono. Even the sections have more than one microphone on them and when you bring up the close mics in a mix, you bring up more than one and they have their own stereo placement.
    I was speaking of SOLO instrument like only 1 flute. You generally don't record the flute in an orchestral environment in stereo.
    Of course sections always will sound best with multiple microphones.

    Regards,
    justus
    rothermusic.de

  6. #6

    Re: I'd like your thoughts...

    I'm specifically referring to Percussion. And not just in film, but in pop music. Sometimes I feel my mix guys will kind of stick everything stereo and in the middle because it's a stereo file, when they may take a mono track and experiment more with the panning. If you're dealing with Shakers, bongos etc, should Stereo sampling techniques REALLY be used?

    Another angle on this is Stylus - everything is stereo - which is way cool. BUT does it make it as practical for standard use? I usually end up panning them into one direction. But I was curious what others thought.


    ALSO - HOW does one go about recording a stereo sample that can be summed to mono without phasing and wierdness?

  7. #7

    Re: I'd like your thoughts...

    Then you have lousy "mixing guys". Think of it this way: Stereo files are always preferred, because you can always make a stereo file mono, but you can't make a mono file true stereo. (You can simulate stereo, but it's not really the same.) The final word on the mix should always be the Producer. If you're giving up this major responsibility over to your "mixing guys", then they're just not good enough Producers to be doing the right thing.

  8. #8

    Re: I'd like your thoughts...

    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman
    Then you have lousy "mixing guys". Think of it this way: Stereo files are always preferred, because you can always make a stereo file mono, but you can't make a mono file true stereo. (You can simulate stereo, but it's not really the same.) The final word on the mix should always be the Producer. If you're giving up this major responsibility over to your "mixing guys", then they're just not good enough Producers to be doing the right thing.
    I totally agree with Journeyman. Maybe you should find better mixing guys! Whenever I deliver stems of my music, it's always stereo files. That gives them the option to mix it however they'd like.

    -Alex

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