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Topic: Open Labs Miko

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  1. #1

    Open Labs Miko

    I was wondering if anyone had experience or own one of the Open Labs Workstations?....I'm most curious how many tracks you can get without freezing/unfreezing....They boast up to 500 voice polyphony but I seriously doubt it....I LOVE my computer instruments but I HATE watching it jump to 16% with just 1 instance of an RMX patch and then launch a Korg Legacy patch and then it's pretty much maxxed until I start freezing stuff...I'm running an AMD 64XP with a gig RAM....I've put 2 Gigs in it out of another PC just to see if it makes a difference and it don't....Just as a test I took Monzter Guitars,Some Back Beat samples and a couple other instruments and spent quite a few hours sampling them into my Korg Triton Extreme as multisamples and starting sequencing....That worked great running it out of the Triton Sampler but I hardly want to spent all the time converting things into a very limited hardware sampler,etc....The Miko looks like a compact very powerful solution but it wouldn't be the first time I've been suckered by the hype....Let me know if anyone has an idea about the PERFORMANCE since there doesn't seem to be anything on the net in that regard....Thanks!....moon

  2. #2

    Re: Open Labs Miko

    William at the Wusik forum on KVR-VST.com has a Miko. (He's the developer of Wusikstation, and is thus the administrator on that forum.) You might want to post there to get his impressions and experiences. He's probably experimented with it a lot and pushed it to its limits.

  3. #3

    Re: Open Labs Miko

    You are not going to get any better performance out of a Neko or Miko than you would with a computer with similar specifications, assuming you keep your music computer free of bloatware (i.e. any type of non-music software that runs in the background).

    With the MiKo you get a product that includes a Windows XP computer, a PreSonus Firebox, a 15" touchscreen computer monitor, a computer keyboard, a 37-key synth action keyboard, and a bunch of controllers (knobs, sliders, switches) all bundled in a single package.

    Unless you really want to have an integrated keyboard, I would suggest buying a dedicated music computer from one of the well-known suppliers (all configured and tested to work)

    http://www.visiondaw.com/productcart/pc/vdawIndex07.asp
    http://www.pcaudiolabs.com/
    http://www.adkproaudio.com/

  4. #4

    Re: Open Labs Miko

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Johnson
    William at the Wusik forum on KVR-VST.com has a Miko. (He's the developer of Wusikstation, and is thus the administrator on that forum.) You might want to post there to get his impressions and experiences. He's probably experimented with it a lot and pushed it to its limits.
    Hello Jake,
    Yes, I read he had one AND Wusikstation IS one of the bundled programs you get with it....I purposely didn't ask this at Open Labs for obvious reasons...KVR might not be a bad place to ask though.....Thanks for the additional info...





    Quote Originally Posted by Wafflemaster
    You are not going to get any better performance out of a Neko or Miko than you would with a computer with similar specifications, assuming you keep your music computer free of bloatware (i.e. any type of non-music software that runs in the background).

    With the MiKo you get a product that includes a Windows XP computer, a PreSonus Firebox, a 15" touchscreen computer monitor, a computer keyboard, a 37-key synth action keyboard, and a bunch of controllers (knobs, sliders, switches) all bundled in a single package.

    Unless you really want to have an integrated keyboard, I would suggest buying a dedicated music computer from one of the well-known suppliers (all configured and tested to work)

    http://www.visiondaw.com/productcart/pc/vdawIndex07.asp
    http://www.pcaudiolabs.com/
    http://www.adkproaudio.com/
    Thanks for the links.....I kind of felt the same way....The biggest benefit would be having everything in one box (I have everything set up in a 5X7 Whisper Room so space IS an issue) BUT $4000 is a lot of money to fork out just to find out it's not going to work like you thought.....

    I went out to the studio and did more tests tonight just running Dimension Pro,HyperSonic 2,Kontakt and some tracks from the Triton....Instead of using Sonar, I used Vstack and did all the sequencing inside the Triton making sure to stay away from the CPU Hogs which for me is Proteus X,RMX,Korg Legacy,etc.....I was able to get about 6 tracks out of the pc with the CPU running about 37% so I'm pretty sure I could load another 1 or 2 without too much trouble....I can live without most of the hogs except for RMX...Instead of upgrading the PC though, I've thought about maybe getting a Roland MV-8800 and sampling all the RMX patterns into it....It has a really neat function that will beat match the audio so you can work at any tempo just like RMX works in your host now...The benefit would be no CPU hit and you could REALLY string the beats together without freezing and unfreezing....I really miss working in pattern mode from my early MPC days too...I get lost in linear recording pretty much around the first Prechorus It would be a drag to have to sample all that but after it was done it would be pretty sweet...I know I'd lose the ability to use the plug ins but from what I'm reading on the MV so far it has some really good effects built in and again No CPU hit....I need to check how powerful the midi editing is...After working in a DAW this could be a drag......moon

  5. #5

    Re: Open Labs Miko

    I have to say that I like the basic, obvious idea of Open Labs, but I'm appalled at their prices. Since personal computers have gotten much more powereful than the processors in keyboards in the past 20 years, why not just create a keyboard that lets you slide in a laptop with a fast hard drive and lots of memory? The same thing that we do now when we attach a laptop to a midi controller. Is it just me, or is the only difference in the physical location of the computer? The usual arrangement is to have the laptop outside the midi keyboard, with a midi-usb cable connecting them. The new setup moves things about three feet, with the computer hidden inside the keyboard case.

    So the better arrangement would be essentially an M-Audio Keystation Pro (with a different action) with a panel that lifts off--you open your laptop and slide it into the slot, so the laptop's screen sits above the keys. Very simple. Very profitable at about $500.00 US. (Yes, all of the specs have to be good--but that becomes the responsibility of the buyer of the laptop: you can create a basic system or a very capable one, but you choose what you want to do, and you have a computer that you can take with you for other work when you need it.)

    I'm hoping that M-Audio or Behringer creates this. I'm aware of the market forces against it: hardware synth makers have for many decades charged 2-3K for their often very, very good instruments. Naturally, they want to continue to realize a profit, and newer companies want to realize a profit, too. But hasn't the available technology simply made the old sales model obsolete? Isn't the simple, obvious step better?

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