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Topic: Dear Violinists:

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  1. #1

    Dear Violinists:

    Here is a question.

    http://jun.music.coocan.jp/music/violin.jpg

    I understand that a d minor chord can be played on the 3rd position (the first bar).

    1. Can a violin play the second, a little changed chord (Dmb5)?

    2. Can a violin play the third chord though I think the positions of fingers should be reverse in case of the first chord?

    I appreciate your advice. As you guessed, I am writing a violin piece using Strad.

    Sincerely,
    Jun Yamamoto
    Tokyo, Japan
    http://jun.music.coocan.jp/
    MIDI AND SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY HAS OPENED AN ENTIRE NEW WORLD OF MUSIC!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Salisbury, UK
    Posts
    312

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    All three chords are playable. The first and third fall easily under the fingers. The second requires a 3rd position finger pattern from the bottom up of 2,1,3,4. (not difficult) As all four-note chords are arpeggiated in some form (here the first two notes double stopped, moving immediately to the second two notes double-stopped then held) a player might decide to use the open d-string on the second chord, the finish the chord with the other 3 notes. If that is not what you want, it is best to specify fingering on the score. The most likely to be chosen fingering of the first chord is 2,2,3,4; the third chord is a straight 4,3,2,1 across the strings.

  3. #3

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    Hi Jun,

    Each of these combinations are playable. However you'll find the third chord may sound a bit rough, simply because the 'f' and 'b' would require the string be stopped higher (and this wouldn't be a typical fingering position for a non-advanced player). I'm guessing you know already that you can't sustain each of those chords for a whole bar though - 4 note vln chords have to be quite short (only 2 notes can be sustained at a time). Make sure you post your piece in the listening room when you're done!

    Cheers,
    Keith.

  4. #4

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    dermod, thank you very much for your instruction.

    I did not know the fingering 2,1,3,4 is possible. It helps a lot.

    Sincerely,
    Jun Yamamoto
    Tokyo, Japan
    http://jun.music.coocan.jp/
    MIDI AND SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY HAS OPENED AN ENTIRE NEW WORLD OF MUSIC!

  5. #5

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    Keith, thank you very much for your advice.

    I certainly understand that all four notes cannot be sustained at the same time for a longer duration because of the tension of strings.

    I will post an mp3 file along with score pdf for your kind review when it's done.

    Sincerely,
    Jun Yamamoto
    Tokyo, Japan
    http://jun.music.coocan.jp/
    MIDI AND SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY HAS OPENED AN ENTIRE NEW WORLD OF MUSIC!

  6. #6

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    This is an old violinist's joke:

    Question: How to make a good violinist sound like two bad ones?

    Answer: Double stops.

    None of these chords are trivial for a number of reasons. The first includes a fifth where intonation impurities are more difficult to hide, the safest way to hit this would be to use the open strings.

    The second chord needs the highest note to be played with the fourth finger which is the weakest in regards to vibrato (on the violin we count thumb, then first to fourth finger). But this one is doable.

    The third chord needs the fourth finger to be on the G string and the first on the E string which needs the hand and the wrist to be twisted very much. Not easy to hit in a performance situation. I would need about 0.5 seconds of a not playing break before to fold my hand into that position.

    I am not saying it is not playable. But chances are high that quadruple stops are sounding a little out of tune unless the performer does some practising, and in that case he or she wants to be sure the musical effect pays for it.

    With other words, expose difficult passages and don't bury it them in much noise of other instruments. In the case you are just seeking for a guitar chord replacement featuring another solo instrument I would exchange the third chord with an easier alternation.
    All your strings belong to me!
    www.strings-on-demand.com

  7. #7

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    Quote Originally Posted by Jun Yamamoto


    I appreciate your advice. As you guessed, I am writing a violin piece using Strad.

    Sincerely,
    Could this be the Jun Yamamoto I knew in Tokyo about 30 years ago? Were you ever an actor?

    I was studying Gagaku with the Kunaicho musicians, as well as koto, harp, and traditional Japanese healing practices. You would have known me as "Nancy," and I spoke some Japanese.

    Could it be?

  8. #8

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    Quote Originally Posted by Hannes_F
    This is an old violinist's joke:

    Question: How to make a good violinist sound like two bad ones?

    Answer: Double stops.
    Thank you very much for your important input, Hannes.

    I will try my best to write reasonable phrases as much as possible. Once it is done I would like to present it in this forum to seek opinions of the string experts here.

    I do not have any specific opportunity for the tune to be performed live but I wish to make the tune at least "live-playable".

    The tune is for solo violin and duration will be about 5 minutes.

    Sincerely,
    Jun Yamamoto
    Tokyo, Japan
    http://jun.music.coocan.jp/
    MIDI AND SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY HAS OPENED AN ENTIRE NEW WORLD OF MUSIC!

  9. #9

    Re: Dear Violinists:

    Quote Originally Posted by Saraswati
    Could this be the Jun Yamamoto I knew in Tokyo about 30 years ago? Were you ever an actor?
    Unfortunately, I do not think so. 30 years ago, I was a university student in Tokyo, spending most of my time on amateur fusion band activities.

    As you may know, both of the first name "Jun" and the last name "Yamamoto" are very popular in Japan so that there live many many Jun Yamamoto's here

    Sincerely,
    Jun Yamamoto
    Tokyo, Japan
    http://jun.music.coocan.jp/
    MIDI AND SAMPLING TECHNOLOGY HAS OPENED AN ENTIRE NEW WORLD OF MUSIC!

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