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Topic: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

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  1. #1

    Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Gigue in G, 1:26, 2.6Mb

    Genre........Baroque/Celtic (string duet)
    Composer.....Darwin Kopp
    Comp. date...January 2008
    Comp. time...a day (plus a day to sequence)
    Samples......Garritan Strad v2 & Gofriller v1
    Sequencer....Overture
    Reverb.......KP2 Convolution
    EQ...........KP2 3-band parametric
    Monitors.....Dynaudio Acoustics BM5
    Feedback:
    ..Composition...yes
    ..Performance...yes
    ..Sonics........no

    Just a short duet to see how the Strad and Gofriller sound together.

  2. #2

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Hi DarwinKopp,

    thank you for presenting this. It is very interesting for me to listen to folk style strings!

    I like the bowing of your instruments, and I think your vibrato is also appropriate according the style.

    Composition-wise the first thing I notice is that the two voices are not contrapunctual but "with-punctual" - same rhythm.

    If it were mine I would roll off the heights for creating more distance to the instruments. Another point is that you perhaps try sending the sound 100 % wet through the convolution. If this is too wet then maybe choose another IR or manipulate it (compress, make room smaller, whatever). The idea would be to have nothing of the direct sound left in the result.

    A very interesting track in an interesting style, I am playing it for the fourth or fifth time now.

    Best
    Hannes
    All your strings belong to me!
    www.strings-on-demand.com

  3. #3

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Hi Hannes,

    My goal here was to write something short and lively that joined the two solo strings in the same piece, so I'm happy to read you found this of interest.

    Composition-wise the first thing I notice is that the two voices are not contrapunctual but "with-punctual" - same rhythm.
    Yes, I had a hard time categorizing this. I agree it's a lot more folk than baroque, though I think it could pass as a folk tune from the baroque era. I was thinking along the lines of something like Lilliburlero, the famous(?) Irish jig/march from that period.

    If it were mine I would roll off the heights for creating more distance to the instruments.
    I have already rolled the highs off the Strad rather substantially. You may be noticing the open E, which is used a fair amount in the first strain. I know it's kind of spitty, but that's to be expected. As an aside, I wish the Strad had the option to finger this note (like the Gofriller's sul' altra corda).

    Another point is that you perhaps try sending the sound 100 % wet through the convolution. If this is too wet then maybe choose another IR or manipulate it (compress, make room smaller, whatever). The idea would be to have nothing of the direct sound left in the result.
    I always run reverb 100% wet, and then return it to the mix which already has the dry sounds. This is the way we actually perceive the instrument acoustically, i.e., one hears the instrument directly as it performs onstage, mixed with the reflected sound from the acoustic space it is performing in. Or did you literally mean no dry sound at all in the mix?

    Thanks for giving a listen and leaving your impressions!

    Regards,
    Darwin

  4. #4
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    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Darwin,

    Techinical and style issues aside, I found the work very pleasent to listen to. And I liked your production and use of the string instruments. Thanks for posting it here.

    Gary

    www.garybricault.com

  5. #5

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Hi Jon,

    The only thing that stuck out to me is what Hannes mentions below, and that's that for the majority of the time the instruments match rhythmically.
    It's not uncommon for simple folk duets to harmonize the melody in parallel, though I did try to vary the texture in spots.

    Perhaps this was just becasue you were testing out the Strad and Gofriller, but I'd love to hear some interplay between the two.
    I agree, as I was thinking the same thing as I worked on this. A planned second duet will include more interaction.

    Thanks for the feedback!

    Darwin

  6. #6

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Hi Gary,

    Techinical and style issues aside, I found the work very pleasent to listen to. And I liked your production and use of the string instruments. Thanks for posting it here.
    That's definitely what I was going for, just a happy little tune for violin and cello. These really are great instruments, especially the cello. The Strad has some minor issues, but it's such a difficult entity to model that I'm quite overjoyed with its current capabilities.

    Thanks for listening!

    Darwin

  7. #7

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    While I'm not able to give a technical reply, I can say that the performance, reverb sounded great to me. I enjoyed the little performance nuances given to the violin.

    YBaCuO

  8. #8

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Hi YBaCuO,

    While I'm not able to give a technical reply, I can say that the performance, reverb sounded great to me. I enjoyed the little performance nuances given to the violin.
    It's good to read the production sounds OK on your end. I've just recently started doing the final mix to monitors (instead of headphones). Thanks for lending an ear!

  9. #9

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    DarwinKopp

    My first thought was of an Irish Jig. I have heard this kind of interaction before and can understand why you chose it for this.

    Nowadays, more variation is required, but it is nice to travel back to the past now and then.

    I am sure you are enjoying your new toys.

    Well done

    Ron

  10. #10

    Re: Gigue in G - Strad/Gofer duet

    Hi Ron,

    Nowadays, more variation is required, but it is nice to travel back to the past now and then.
    I've spent a fair amount of time playing Celtic fiddle, as it's one of my favorite violin styles. Of course this type of tune can be extended and elaborated, but I just wanted to do a quickie, straightforward duet to see what the instruments sounded like together without any accompaniment. I can't recall hearing a Strad/Gofer pairing, so I thought the forum might be interested.

    Thanks for dropping by!

    Regards,
    Darwin

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