• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Topic: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SAN ANTONIO, TX
    Posts
    1,386

    Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    After hearing Gary's great work on the G Major, I recalled a clarinet quintet
    I arranged of the Fuga in G Minor. I thought it would be done in a snap, but range differences in clarinet & sax called for a lot of octave shuffle.
    I wrote this about 4 years ago when I didn't have an awareness of the raised 6th & 7th within a minor melody. I knew minor scales but didn't connect. This came from a keyboard part.
    Gary


    hi-fi URL: http://www.soundclick.com/util/getpl...id=6249581&q=h

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Penfield (Rochester), NY
    Posts
    1,719

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Quote Originally Posted by garymosse View Post
    After hearing Gary's great work on the G Major, I recalled a clarinet quintet
    I arranged of the Fuga in G Minor. I thought it would be done in a snap, but range differences in clarinet & sax called for a lot of octave shuffle.
    I wrote this about 4 years ago when I didn't have an awareness of the raised 6th & 7th within a minor melody. I knew minor scales but didn't connect. This came from a keyboard part.
    Gary


    hi-fi URL: http://www.soundclick.com/util/getpl...id=6249581&q=h
    Gary,

    Actually this is the same work that I had arranged for the quartet, I typo'd the wrong mode in the title block for my previous posting. It is an interest arrangement as a quintet. I am not sure I would add so many embellishments to it as it tends to get rather distracting. But the mix of sax and clarinet works well. Thanks for sharing it here.

    Gary

    www.garybricault.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SAN ANTONIO, TX
    Posts
    1,386

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Hi Gary,
    I was thinking as I listened that I had heard this before. I think my left brain info trumped my right brain.(title)
    I have thought for sometime that consecutive ornaments call for a great amount of craft in a player, but this sound both on clarinet & sax is interesting. I didn't mean to back stage, but I thought a maj/min contrast would be interesting.
    Gary

  4. #4

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Gary - (Will the real Gary please stand up?)

    This made for delightful listening. (It also brought back a lot of memories of long and late sessions of playing baroque pieces on Clarinet-Sax/Trombone, which is another story!)

    What I'd point out is an issue of phrasing/breath. I think the Saxes would have no problems. The Clarinet player, though, needs to breath at least once per week (). Is there some change in phrasing that occurs to you that would allow the listener to hear that the players breathe? I might also want the Saxes brought out a little more - but I'm not sure what you intended here. At some points the bottom closely resembles bowed strings, and if this is what you wanted, I'd leave it as it is.

    Thank you for sharing this. I really like listening to orchestrations like this.


    Joe

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SAN ANTONIO, TX
    Posts
    1,386

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Hi Joe,
    Thanks for listening.
    The matter of breathing in clarinets and saxes is a rehearsal problem in real life. Players place breath marks related to how long they can play. Lower & higher notes on sax need more air. The best advice I ever heard was breath after a dotted note, but that doesn't happen much here.
    There is a way to place breath marks in the Finale score, but I haven't learned it yet.
    I think there are at least two opinions on playing music of the past. My thought is that dynamics were not used in the Baroque period. Keyboards for most of Bachs life played only loud. Pianoforte was the name given to the new keyboard that could play loud & soft.
    In Mozart's time, the Mannheim "Rocket was so named because it used
    dynamic contrast.
    The other opinion is that you should treat any composition musically ...
    Gary

  6. #6

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Gary -

    I know that many players mark their scores for breath, but I never did . . . I learned to hear phrasing in the music, and worked within that. (I've also, by the way, gotten a standing ovation for a particularly long sustained note in a jazz solo (on Baritone Sax), even before I learned cyclic (circular) breathing.)

    In the sixties I was the copyist hired to score a Bach piece for the Music Dept. at Plattsburgh State. The Dept. Chair spent a bit of time studying the church organ Bach used to write this piece. His orchestration was intended to emulate the organ itself. In a situation such as that one, you wouldn't want "breath breaks," but continuity emulating the original instrument. That was something that came to mind as I listened to your work. The lower pitched stops came out slightly "background," as your Saxes do . . . and I think it's a marvelous effect. (As a side note: that sort of scoring was, in it's day, the equivalent of what sample producers do today. We had only boxes of cassette tapes Jim Miller made of the Organ, rather than today's sophisticated technology, but it was an enriching experience.)

    You're right about dynamics in Baroque music. I was taught that it was in planes, with little or no variation within a plane. With a "static" instrument such as an Organ, dynamics were dependent on the assistant "playing" the bellows. They had to provide a consistent and continuous pressure or the dynamics would fall off. It's pretty amazing to think of the discipline necessary to coordinate the air supply with the demands of the player! Today we just plug that puppy in and motor controls provide the air.

    In any event, I do think that rendering some of this timeless music in more modern orchestrations is valuable. If the orchestrator chooses to take license with phrasing and dynamics, that's fine with me . . . I don't know that the original composer didn't hear these subtleties in their own minds. For all I know, they may have heard a great range of dynamic change and expression, but been limited by the available instruments.

    I look forward to more such pieces from you. Once again, thank you for sharing this.

    Joe

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SAN ANTONIO, TX
    Posts
    1,386

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Thank you Joe for your inciteful comments.
    Many details about putting music together seem to be "hidden from the masses." I used to hear about teachers who would introduce little gems to their students only after a period of time. Nuggets which make the music learning experience more interesting.
    Thinking about that, it would be a waste of time to flood students with info before they need it.
    Gary

  8. #8

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Nice arrangement for the sax quintet, Gary (though I
    think I might take it slightly slower and use ornamentation
    more sparingly in places). It always amazes me how
    completely comfortably The Master's work translates
    to just about any combination of instruments.

    Some years back - this is absolutely true - I heard
    this very piece performed by a group of players at
    (I think) the University of New Haven... on kazoos!
    And done so well it nearly brought me to tears.

    My best,


    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SAN ANTONIO, TX
    Posts
    1,386

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    Thanks for listening, David.
    Back in the days of numerous band transcriptions. it was obvious that clarinets et al could not play the multiple tongued notes originally written for strings. Playing at a slower tempo was and is a given.
    Gary

  10. #10

    Re: Bach Fuga In G Minor-sax Quintet

    And the "Battle of the Gary Bands" Continues! - I know I'm very late coming in on this, but I'm doing the best I can during my whacko slam-dunk schedule these days, dropping by a minute now and then to participate at least a bit here in our good ol Forums.

    Wow, Gary. One of the most entertaining recordings yet from you. I'm not a huge fan of Fugues, because they often sound like relentless and too purely mathematical finger exercises to me. But there certainly can be an elegance to a Fugue which, in small doses, can be entertaining.

    I enjoyed this quite a bit. "Overly ornamented" - OK, I suppose that could be the case, as others have pointed out. Not having slight pauses for breath throughout is a distraction, but I understand it's a difficulty when working in Notation, while in a DAW one just plays or edits notes here and there to be a bit shorter than their full value.

    A bit of the "organ effect" that nobody's commented on, especially in the middle section, but still the illusion of woodwinds playing this was fairly decently maintained.

    Interesting stuff--I wonder what made you decide to work in this woodwind adaptation area the way Gary Bric's been doing for some time? Inspired by his work I would guess.

    Well, you're both coming up with entertaining pieces - Thanks!

    Randy B.

Go Back to forum
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •