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Topic: Pope Alexander the sixth

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  1. #1

    Pope Alexander the sixth

    Hi everybody! Have rearranged the order of the scenes 7-11.

  2. #2
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    The music sounds regal but I don't picture human slaughter when I'm listening to it. I guess it's more just matter of fact. All in a Pope's day.

    The music is well done.

    It's not hard to know why there was a reformation. I remember reading about one Pope who's daughter was accused of bewitching him. He would conduct orgy contests for entertainment with his daughter by his side. I think she was murdered.


    Phil

  3. #3

    Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    Very well written musically, cannot comment on the historical context.
    All your strings belong to me!
    www.strings-on-demand.com

  4. #4

    Thumbs up Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    Quote Originally Posted by fastlane View Post
    The music sounds regal but I don't picture human slaughter when I'm listening to it. I guess it's more just matter of fact. All in a Pope's day.

    The music is well done.

    It's not hard to know why there was a reformation. I remember reading about one Pope who's daughter was accused of bewitching him. He would conduct orgy contests for entertainment with his daughter by his side. I think she was murdered.


    Phil
    Hi Phil,

    Have added a some lines in the text! The music is hopeful in the beginning, expressing the prisoners hope! But the Borgia family has other plans!
    Cesare Borgia, standing on the balcony of the Vatican with his rifle...!

    Orgando di Vitruvius: The skryer is getting even more red now... I see danger my lord!

    King Gore: What danger? tell me what you see?

    Orgando: I see papal guards forcing ragged prisoners into St. Peter's Square. They are shackled at the wrists and gathered in a close knot near its geographical center. The guards form a phalanx at the broad entry into the square, preventing escape. The prisoners are locked up at the Vatican windows, where, on a small balcony at one of the larger windows, the seventy-year-old Pope Alexander VI, formerly Rodrigo Borgia, stands with his twenty-year-old daughter, Lucrezia Borgia. Both are smiling. A few windows away, dressed completely in black velvet, is Alexander's son, Cesare Borgia. Beside him is a servant, also dressed all in black.

    They think that they will hear words of mercy! Maybe some generous dispensation for their crimes, which ranges from the serious to the trivial? They are hopeful...! But, the Borgia family has other plans!

    Oh, my god! I hear gun shots! One of the prisoners is falling now, Cesare is shooting! The prisoners scurry throughout the square, someone in one of those windows is firing at them. With each shot, the servant hands Cesare a new rifle, fully primed, and he fires again. Each shot is followed by a fresh rifle, and another shot. All of the prisoners are dead now!

    King Gore: What more do you see?

    Orgando: Oh! I see... ! This is the person who almost had me arrested in Rome. It's Pope Alexander! He waves to his son and says: "Fine aim, my son!" Cesare smiles and waves back, he and his servant are leaving the window now and are entering the Vatican apartment. Four men are pulling a cart, they begin to remove the bodies, tossing them in like limp sacks of grain. Cesare's harvest is taken away, to be thrown into the Tiber.

    Thanks for your observations regarding the drama,

    Fred

  5. #5

    Cool Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    Quote Originally Posted by Hannes_F View Post
    Very well written musically, cannot comment on the historical context.
    Hi Hannes,

    Glad you enjoyed the music!

    I have added a second clip to increase the intensity of the drama!


    Thanks for lending an ear,


    Regards,

    Fred

  6. #6

    Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    The Borgias certainly present a rich and complex
    historical tapestry from which to draw inspiration --
    well reflected in this finely crafted work, Fredrik.

    I might suggest a moment's more attention to the
    transition ~2:43; perhaps even just a caesura, to
    smooth that a bit.

    My best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .

  7. #7

    Cool Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux View Post
    The Borgias certainly present a rich and complex
    historical tapestry from which to draw inspiration --
    well reflected in this finely crafted work, Fredrik.

    I might suggest a moment's more attention to the
    transition ~2:43; perhaps even just a caesura, to
    smooth that a bit.

    My best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    .
    Hi David,

    I have rearranged the order of the scenes now! Scene 7 and 8 are separated. I think the flow is more natural now!

    Scene 7. POPE ALEXANDER VI (1492-1503)

    Scene 8. Play gently my minstrel...

    Scene 9. "The Vitruvian Man"

    Scene 10. Chateau Bacchanal , Cleopatra's dance and Music for the king

    Scene 11. "Cobras of the Pharaoh"



    Cheers,

    Fred

  8. #8

    Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    Quite well done, Fredrik. The context of the piece is certainly imaginable through your very effective dramaticism.

    The recording itself seemed to distort here and there, probably attributable to my cheap speakers here at work. I'll have to take another listen later at home.

    All in all, though, very enjoyable and highly characteristic of the genre... and I'm a sucker for a picardy third! Nice stuff!

    Danny

  9. #9

    Angry Re: Pope Alexander the sixth

    Quote Originally Posted by DDW View Post
    Quite well done, Fredrik. The context of the piece is certainly imaginable through your very effective dramaticism.

    The recording itself seemed to distort here and there, probably attributable to my cheap speakers here at work. I'll have to take another listen later at home.

    All in all, though, very enjoyable and highly characteristic of the genre... and I'm a sucker for a picardy third! Nice stuff!

    Danny
    Hi Danny,

    Have rearranged the order of the scenes now! Scene 7 and 8 are separated. I think the flow is more natural now!

    Scene 7. POPE ALEXANDER VI (1492-1503)

    Scene 8. Play gently my minstrel...

    Scene 9. "The Vitruvian Man"

    Scene 10. Chateau Bacchanal , Cleopatra's dance and Music for the king

    Yes, I love Picardian thirds! Such a charming harmonic little trick.

    Thanks for your interest in my Machiavellian Renaissance story!

    Talk to you later Danny,

    Fred

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