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Topic: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

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  1. #1

    Lightbulb Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    http://www.sample-modeling.com/Demos...ncert_no_2.mp3

    a little comment to the demo I did, actually published in Sample Modeling site:

    - the "Samplemodelling The Trumpet" Piccolo Trumpet .nki is used as solo

    - it's featuring Stradivari and Gofriller as solos violin and continuo

    - my custom re-programming of several other fine solo instruments: Sampletekk Baroque flute and Harpsichord; Modular Series Solo Oboe.

    - the ripieno strings are Kirk Hunter's chamber strings

    The Cello line, the fugal imitations of Trumpet and Violin were a pleasure programming due to flexibility of Sample Modelled VI. Flute and oboe were possible only with some modification of the K2 programs with dynamic and articulation controllers, and some scripting, to go as closer as possible to the expression of VI: the excellent samples were anyway a good starting point.

  2. #2

    Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    I am going to buy this product the second it becomes available, and plan to buy any other "sample modeled" instruments that come to market as long as the prices remain so reasonable. I think this is amazing work, and none of my comments here should be interpreted as diminishing it.

    Having said that I have a few comments about your demo. To my ears the trumpet sounds too "legato", there isn't enough separation between many of the notes. I don't get the sense of an instrument being played by someone who has to breathe.

    Also, as an old-school musical theater synth programmer I can tell you that nothing does more to make a sampled instrument sound realistic than having a real musician or two playing along with it. The realism of the trumpet here is diminished by the less than believable oboe. This product will no doubt be used in conjunction with real musicians in many applications. I suggest making some demos that way as well.

  3. #3

    Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    Fabio:

    I'm very impressed with your Brandenburg demo. The flexibility and musicality of the trumpet are stunning indeed. Is the sequencing of this instrument easily accomplished primarily through playing in via a keyboard, or are there additional playing techniques to learn, akin to the Stradavari and Gofriller instruments??

    Again, you are awesome! Keep more coming!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    Superb, as always, Fabio
    Cubase 5.1 | Cubase 4.5.2 | Digital Performer 7.0 | Mac OSX 10.5.8 || Mac "MDD" dual 1GB | 1.75GB RAM | MOTU PCI-424/2408mk3 | MOTU MidiTimepice AV

  5. #5

    Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    sounds amazing Fabio!

    I am wondering what this technology can do when applied to other instruments!

    best,
    Roberto

  6. #6

    Cool Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    Quote Originally Posted by TechEverlasting View Post
    I am going to buy this product the second it becomes available, and plan to buy any other "sample modeled" instruments that come to market as long as the prices remain so reasonable. I think this is amazing work, and none of my comments here should be interpreted as diminishing it.

    Having said that I have a few comments about your demo. To my ears the trumpet sounds too "legato", there isn't enough separation between many of the notes. I don't get the sense of an instrument being played by someone who has to breathe.

    Also, as an old-school musical theater synth programmer I can tell you that nothing does more to make a sampled instrument sound realistic than having a real musician or two playing along with it. The realism of the trumpet here is diminished by the less than believable oboe. This product will no doubt be used in conjunction with real musicians in many applications. I suggest making some demos that way as well.
    Thanks for the fine suggestions, I agree with your point. In detail:

    - legato: you are right, but it's more a matter of style, frequently this music is played with heavy and short staccato because of limits of instruments (natural trumpet) or players (high register need pressure and attack). I did a more modern and musical rendering, quite not filological, just to show nuances in legato, alternated to staccato (like in some modern trumpet performances).
    - legato without time to breath: you are absolutely right, it's my fault in some long note phrase, I didn't create the real pause for breathing. It's a risk when you play virtual instruments...sorry and thanks for the suggestion, I'll do it next time.
    - oboe: to be honest I don't find it so bad, it's one of the best (or the best) available (I'm an oboe player, and I find it close to the sound and noise of my real instrument). The Recorder is really more flat, but anyway both Oboe and Recorder are just sample libraries, not VI, and not based on the Sample Modeling like Violin, Cello and Trumpet. So articulations are quite flat and repeting always the same sound: you quickly understand listening to it for a while, and so realism is reduced.
    - real players...of course. A professional application is mixing it to real players or completing sessions. Maybe a demo will come soon...

  7. #7

    Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    Quote Originally Posted by RobertTewes View Post
    Fabio:

    I'm very impressed with your Brandenburg demo. The flexibility and musicality of the trumpet are stunning indeed. Is the sequencing of this instrument easily accomplished primarily through playing in via a keyboard, or are there additional playing techniques to learn, akin to the Stradavari and Gofriller instruments??

    Again, you are awesome! Keep more coming!!
    Yes playing keyboard (better if with breath control, but anyway good even with standard expression pedal) is enough to learn.

    Out of the box it's an immediate pleasure to play: you have fun.

    Programming you will add more and more lttle fine details, using a big amount of available controllers. If you used Stradi and Gofriller, you will find it similar but seriously improved.

  8. #8

    Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    I think this instrument is incredible! But there is much to be said (and probably has been said... a lot) that "it's as much about the performance as it is the tools." Fabio very nice work, indeed!

    I have been waiting to hear the more expressive side of the "Trumpet" for jazz situations where the tone is constantly, though subtly changing. I think I heard it in the other demos and I am impressed.

  9. #9

    Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    Very coool Mr. Fabio!
    "Music is the shorthand of emotion." Leo Tolstoy

    Listen to me, tuning my triangle http://www.box.net/shared/ae822u6r3i

  10. #10

    Smile Re: Samplemodelling "The Trumpet": a baroque demo

    Quote Originally Posted by beach View Post
    sounds amazing Fabio!

    I am wondering what this technology can do when applied to other instruments!

    best,
    Roberto
    The basic concept has been apllied to the Violin, (Stradivari Solo Violin) one of the most difficoult instrument to manage due to the complex model of the acoustic and the expression.

    Actually the scripting, the modeling engine, and the AI are quite advanced compared to the old Garritan cooperation.

    Even the sampling is now a custom made anechoic, by far better than the traditional sampling of Garritan used in Stradi, not really suited for Sample Modeling: the samples of the Trumpet are and samples of all future instruments will be recorded and processed in a way strictly designed for Sample Modeling.

    I'm expecting reallyy good things...

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