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Topic: Garritan meets Cage

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  1. #1

    Garritan meets Cage

    Here is my arrangement of a famous John Cage work arranged for a mixed ensemble of Garritan instruments:

    JABB - Accordion, Latin Percussion, Guitar, Vibraphone, Brush Kit
    GPO - Strings, Glass Harmonica, Bass Clarinet
    CMB - Euphonium, Alto Sax section, assorted marching percussion
    Strad v2, Gofriller Cello

    Here it is

    Enjoy!

    chris.

  2. #2

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Great! I love the tasteful balance of instrumentation. Nothing is overdone.

    The mix is crystal clear as well.

    Did you perform this live, or is it sequenced? If the latter, I can't imagine how long it took you! You've clearly paid a great deal of attention to detail here.

    Well done!
    Owen

  3. #3

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Chris, I don't hear anything...

    Yudit

  4. #4

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Quote Originally Posted by sunbird View Post
    Chris, I don't hear anything...

    Yudit
    Neither did John Cage "fans" hear anything when this was first "performed".

    (It's a joke. John Cage was a non-musical nutcase in my humble opinion. He had a lot of followers in his time, which proves that there are many strange people in the world.)

    One of his "works" consisted of a table full of radios all tuned to different stations playing simultaneously. If that's "music" or "art" or whatever, then I am a Yugoslavian astronaut.

    Larry
    Larry G. Alexander
    www.alexandermusic.com

  5. #5

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    This is simply delightfully arranged and just what I needed after a day at school with noisy kids... Splendid
    Kind Regards

    Louis Dekker
    My Music Site

    Pour être grand, il faut avoir été petit.

  6. #6

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Chris,
    Your realization is generally excellent, but the attacks in the euphonium are a bit mushy, and I would use less compression.
    As the ranking (or rankest) member of the euphonium police on this forum, I must INSIST that you correct this glaring euphonium oversight immediately, as the character of the piece is totally destroyed by the euphonium's mushy attacks. I will be listening eagerly for the corrections. The consequences of not making the corrections are unspeakable.

    Snorlax.

    PS: HERE is a cool video of Cage on the old game show "I've got a Secret" with Garry Moore. Cage is playing WATER WALK, a post-4:33 opus...

    It's interesting to note that some things never change: A union dispute over which union was responsible for plugging the radios in prevented Cage from realizing his piece in the intended manner.
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  7. #7

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry G. Alexander View Post
    Neither did John Cage "fans" hear anything when this was first "performed".

    (It's a joke. John Cage was a non-musical nutcase in my humble opinion. He had a lot of followers in his time, which proves that there are many strange people in the world.)

    One of his "works" consisted of a table full of radios all tuned to different stations playing simultaneously. If that's "music" or "art" or whatever, then I am a Yugoslavian astronaut.

    Larry
    That explains!
    I never heard before about this John Cage... and it sounds like I didn't miss anything either... LOL

  8. #8
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
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    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Whoa, dude - back off on the dynamics. Are you trying to blow out my speakers?
    Ron Pearl

    Website:

    ronaldmpearl.com

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    http://myspace.com/rmpearl

  9. #9

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Magnificent!

    I think, though, I would look at the tempi
    around 2:07-2:19. This strikes me as rather
    too aggressive for the musical content at
    that point.

    The dynamics, however, are brilliantly
    thought out and executed. And your
    approach to articulations? Flawless! I did
    not hear a single note in this with which I
    would disagree... which likewise testifies
    to your commitment to accuracy and
    unfailingly remaining true to the music.

    Bravo!

    My best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

  10. #10

    Re: Garritan meets Cage

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry G. Alexander View Post
    (It's a joke. John Cage was a non-musical nutcase in my humble opinion. He had a lot of followers in his time, which proves that there are many strange people in the world.)

    One of his "works" consisted of a table full of radios all tuned to different stations playing simultaneously. If that's "music" or "art" or whatever, then I am a Yugoslavian astronaut.

    Larry
    I tend to think of John Cage as more of a philosopher and explorer. It's perfectly reasonable to question the validity and aesthetic value of his music -- in fact that's basically the point. His ideas (and his realizations of those ideas) shed light on where our definition of the term "music" begins and ends. There's a lot of grey area once you start pushing the boundaries, and that's what he did--he pushed the boundaries as far as he could. "If I go this far, can I still call it music? How about this far?" 4'33" is probably the furthest this question can be pushed (although I'm sure there's plenty of pushing to be done in other directions too).

    Art can be a very subjective thing, resistant being pigeonholed into strict definitions. So if you want to know "what art is," you have to go all the way and take in the whole spectrum--grey-area and all--then decide for yourself where you want to draw the art/not-art line.

    From what I've read and heard of Cage, he was simply enamored with sound and derived great pleasure and beauty from all sound. To his ears, a dog barking in the distance or an air-conditioning hum was just as beautiful and pleasing as a singing solo violin. After all, it's all just vibrating air, why does the vibration have to be set off by a contraption we arbitrarily call an "instrument"? Our eardrums don't know what started the air vibrating.

    I certainly understand the sentiment -- I've had my moments when I've been overwhelmed by the beauty of a sound, the cacophony of animal sounds in a forest, the clicketty-clacks of my car starting, the rumbling of traffic above me on an overpass, the sustain sound of a ringing piano string, the crinkling of cellophane, etc. Would I put a frame around it and call it music? Probably not, but at times it affects me the same way music does. Cage's music (and writing) calls some attention to this.

    I don't have a John Cage album collection on rotation in my CD player. I'm not sure I even own a John Cage album, actually. But I'm certainly glad he did what he did, asked the questions he asked, pushed the boundaries he pushed, because his work sheds light on how I feel about and understand music.

    chris.

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