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Topic: Therapeutic Tunes

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  1. #1

    Lightbulb Therapeutic Tunes

    A study reported in Nature Clinical Practice Neurology (2008) 4:238-39 (summarizing a study published in Brain (2008) 131:866-76) found that stroke patients who listened to music (at least 1 hour per day for 2 months, during the acute recovery phase) showed greater recovery of verbal memory and focused attention than the control group or the group that listened to audio books for the same amount of time. The music group also showed less confusion and depression.

    Fortunately, composers are not required to obtain FDA approval for new music...

    Grant
    ==============================
    Grant Green ||| www.contrabass.com
    Sarrusophones and other seismic devices

  2. #2
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Therapeutic Tunes

    Fortunately, composers are not required to obtain FDA approval for new music...
    Shhhhhhhh not so loud.
    Styxx

  3. #3

    Re: Therapeutic Tunes

    Music Therapy. . . .

    For one nursing research class I did a "Lit-review" paper titled, "The Therapeutic Effects of Music on Patients Receiving Chemotherapy". Much of the information found for this paper was found from music therapy journals. I believe that some colleges still offer music therapy as a Major.

    Think about it. . . music is a powerful medium that can greatly effects one's mood or state of mind. The role of film composition comes to mind. A well written film score can help bring out emotions like happiness, sadness, fear, calm, etc., etc., etc. Film composers (any composer, actually!) write music to purposefully elicit very specific emotions. The ability to evoke tears or laughter or agitation or peacefulness is quite powerful. Research has shown that music can play a powerful role in helping people relax while waiting for, or during, medical procedures. It's been documented that patients receiving chemotherapy feel more relaxed, or at least feel less anxious while listening to the music of their choice. Interestingly, beside providing needed (therapeutic) relaxation, music has also been shown to lower blood pressure, heart rates, and even improve the immune system. Actually, if I remember correctly, anything diversional activity, like listening to music, is helpful for all of these things (lower blood pressure, lower heart rate, etc.).

    Several years ago, when I used to work on an oncology/hematology unit, I presented my "findings" to my fellow co-workers. My nurse manager was so impressed by the findings that she made funds available to purchase several CD players for both the staff and the patients. Also, through additional donated funds, a CD library was created. It's my understanding that the CD players and CD library are still being utilized by the staff and patients.

    I feel confident in saying that any medical/surgical related facility can benefit its patients with some form of "music therapy". The cost need not be too expensive. The return, on the other hand, can be enormous. A relaxed patient is a happy patient. A happy patient just might heal a little quicker (or at least possibly not get too much sicker). Just having a more calm & relaxed patient is a much desired therapeutic goal in and of itself.

    I have no idea HOW music can be therapeutic. I have no idea how listening to music can effect the brain. However, I am not surprised to learn that music therapy can demonstrate positive effects for some neuro-patients. I hope to locate and read the article noted in the original post. I'm sure I'll find it quite interesting and most informative.

    Happy composing, folks. . . . .

    Ted
    Music and humor are healthy for the soul.

  4. #4

    Lightbulb Re: Therapeutic Tunes

    Quote Originally Posted by efiebke View Post
    Music Therapy. . . .
    ***
    Actually, if I remember correctly, anything diversional activity, like listening to music, is helpful for all of these things (lower blood pressure, lower heart rate, etc.).
    ***
    Ted
    Actually, I thought that one of the most interesting aspects of the article was that music scored significantly higher than "spoken word" (audiobooks), even for things like improving verbal memory. Seems counter-intuitive to me, at least.

    Grant
    ==============================
    Grant Green ||| www.contrabass.com
    Sarrusophones and other seismic devices

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