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Topic: a little OT:

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  1. #1
    Senior Member June-Bug-Dan's Avatar
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    Arrow a little OT:

    Hello,


    I would like it is someone could advise me on this.


    I have been searching for the right kind of printer paper that is suitable for printing sheet music on.
    I dont know wether 80gsm or 90gsm is better?
    If someone could tell me the standard paper thickness for sheet music that would be great thank you.
    I've found that normal printing paper is too thin where as sheet music that i have previously purchased has been some what thicker and less vulnerable to tearing and creasing.
    Any help would be great.
    Thanks in advance.

    Regards,

    Dan.W
    Trumpet, cornet, flugel player. Composer and student.

  2. #2

    Re: a little OT:

    Generally, I use 28# stock, or even heavier. Partly for durability;
    but more importantly, so there's no bleed when printing two-sided.
    I also check to be sure it's acid-free "archival quality"... so it
    doesn't yellow and fall apart with age.

    For finish, it depends on use. I like a very high-brightness white
    for study scores. A conductor working under bright lights, though,
    will usually prefer a buff color due to glare. (Any gloss finish
    should also be avoided for the same reason.)

    For low-cost printing in standard sizes, you might look into
    sites like LuLu.com and CreateSpace.com. For larger sizes, you
    generally need to find a good local printer; though I think there
    are some websites for companies that do that, as well.

    Dan, I'm not aware of any particular "standards" for this, other
    than common sense; but if there are any in print, I'd be most
    interested to see them, too.

    My best,



    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

  3. #3
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: a little OT:

    Well, I use 24 lb because it is easily available. But if heavier were available easily and at a decent price, I would go for a bit heavier. I think it depends also on whether you use ink jet or laser. I use laser, and can use a bit thinner paper than ink jet.

    Brightness of white is a matter of preference, I think. I am far less concerned about it than weight.

    Richard

  4. #4
    Senior Member June-Bug-Dan's Avatar
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    Re: a little OT:

    Thank you all for your help!

    I'll have to contact some printing companies and see whats best for me

    Again thank you for all your help, it is greatly appreciated.

    Kind Regards,

    Dan.W
    Trumpet, cornet, flugel player. Composer and student.

  5. #5

    Re: a little OT:

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux View Post
    I also check to be sure it's acid-free "archival quality"... so it
    doesn't yellow and fall apart with age.

    David
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

    David,

    Now, where is the fun in THAT??? Everyone knows that the more smelly and aged the paper is, the better the composition is! Why, all my work is printed on old used cheese paper! Funny thing is, people just take my word that the stuff printed on that paper is just great.
    Go figure



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  6. #6

    Re: a little OT:

    Absorbency may be an issue if using an inkjet printer. You want paper that will take and hold the ink well. From experience, too smooth a surface will not allow the ink to absorb, instead leaving the ink kind of "sitting" on the paper, which can lead to smearing, though a lengthy dry time can help. So, among weight, size, and color, keep an eye out for a somewhat rough texture. I also would think twice about ink jet printing in potentially high-moisture environments, e.g., outside performance, marching, spitting musicians , etc., as inkjet ink is water-soluble and can easily run.

  7. #7

    Re: a little OT:

    Paper is one thing I do not skimp on. I keep a ream of cheap "draft" paper as well as a ream of expensive quality stuff for when it matters.

    I always go as heavy and bright as I can. I think 28# is a bare minimum, and would maybe go up to 32#+, depending on brand.

    I also agree with the idea of going with lulu.com or createspace.com for your printing needs. Best to make absolutely sure it has been proofed and edited to death first before sending it off.
    - Jamie Kowalski

    All Hands Music - Kowalski on the web
    The Ear Is Always Correct - Writings on composition

  8. #8

    Re: a little OT:

    I have some old manuscript paper (about 1960) that I bought while at school.

    Its very creamy in colour but has a soft finish that a modern printer might not like, but the important thing is that its ragged, that is the paper was made using old cloth as well as wood pulp. I was playing something I wrote on it then only last week, thats about 48 years, its a bit tatty round the edges and the folds (its two pages per sheet) are getting thin but its got plenty of life in it yet.

    I've got some old music printed, over 100 years old, one with the autograph of Arthur Sullivan on it and its all the same type of paper. (probably more than 110 gram)

    Bet you can't get it now tho.
    Derek
    Things may come and things may go but the art school dance goes on forever
    NOW WITH Cubase 5, JABB,GPO, Fender Strat, Ibanez RG, Yamaha Fretless Bass, Framus Archtop, The Trumpet and Mr T Sax, together with GREEN SEALING WAX


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