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Topic: Capricious Clarinet

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  1. #1

    Capricious Clarinet

    Well, I delved into my library of works when I was youngher and came across this one that I wrote for my brother (clarinet player) and his wife (piano accompanist). He performed it in 1979 (now I really am dating myself!) I realized it (it is an alleatoric score, so I wrote it the way I would have played if I could play clarinet.) It uses multi-phonics which sound much better in Garritan's library than in real performance. It's a whimsical piece but tough to take if you do not like this style of atonalism (clusters not chords, idioms not melodies - though there is the hint of melody and harmony in it to help hold it all together.)

    Pleas do not throw objects at me after listening - you have been warned!!!!

    The Capricious Clarinet
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  2. #2

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Strangely enough, I LIKE IT!!!!!!!!

    Put that piano a bit at the foreground. I don't know if those "sliders" are possible with a clarinet. But when your brother played it, I am sure it is.
    Never knew this. Stupid term: "atonal". What do I hear? Musical tones isn't it? So it is tonal....

    More of this, please.

    Raymond (the ending is a bit abrupt)

  3. #3

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Well, I played it and I am still cursing the writer.
    Multiphonics were the hardest part of the piece. The bends were not that bad to play at all. If you can do "Rhapsody In Blue" over 2 octaves on a gliss, than this is easy!

    The only hard part I remember is learning and attempting to play the multiphonics. I think I got halve of them close to alright.

    The piece is very much fun for the performers. Listening is much easier if you follow the longer lines of the piece.

    Thanks for doing a Garritan version of this. At last I know what the multiphonics should have sounded like.

    BTW this is a very good representation of an alleatoric piece. You did a great job on the presentation. I agree with Raymond, though, a little more piano up in the mix. They are equally important players of this piece.
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  4. #4

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Bill

    Definitely push that piano up a bit.

    This is my kind of music and it is nice to hear others take on atonality.

    This sounds like the JABB Steinway run thru the older effects program (I forget its name); is that the case?

    Nice work regardless

    Ron
    "Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein

    http://composersforum.ning.com/profile/RonaldFerguson

  5. #5

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond62 View Post
    Put that piano a bit at the foreground. I don't know if those "sliders" are possible with a clarinet. But when your brother played it, I am sure it is.
    Never knew this. Stupid term: "atonal". What do I hear? Musical tones isn't it? So it is tonal....

    (the ending is a bit abrupt)
    Thanks for listening Raymond. Yes, the piano does need to come forward. In my first rendition the piano was too loud, I guess I over-compensated.

    Atonal refers to the fact that the piece has no tonal center or key. Thus practical harmony does not apply. It is based on tonal clusters that expand and contract. Tonal music implies a tone center (Symphony in C has C as its tonal center).

    Yes the ending is a bit abrupt. The reason is I used a 'quasi' tonal center in the little melody that the piano introduces and the clarinet concludes the piece with. It's like swatting a pesky fly that is bothering you. "Go away you little tonal center you!" It's kind of a musical joke.

    Thanks for listening,
    Bill
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  6. #6

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    Thanks for doing a Garritan version of this. At last I know what the multiphonics should have sounded like.

    BTW this is a very good representation of an alleatoric piece. You did a great job on the presentation. I agree with Raymond, though, a little more piano up in the mix. They are equally important players of this piece.
    Well, in actual practice, the multiphonics will not sound that clear, but it is the pitches (harmonics) that will be present in some multiphonic. Since they are partials from the timbre of the clarinet, the lower ones will be louder then the upper ones. Can't get that effect (at least not yet) with Garritan or Kontakt Player. If anyne knows how please teach me!

    Yes the piano is a bit in the background - I'll ask her to move a bit closer.
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  7. #7

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Quote Originally Posted by rolifer View Post
    Bill

    Definitely push that piano up a bit.

    This is my kind of music and it is nice to hear others take on atonality.

    This sounds like the JABB Steinway run thru the older effects program (I forget its name); is that the case?

    Nice work regardless

    Ron
    Thanks for listeing Ron,

    OK, the piano is going to be louder.
    No, this is the Personal rchestra Steinway with compression set at 'PRO' and convolution for 'Concert Hall - medium' Some of the effects that you hear are created by using the pedal and keeping it down. The piece was to be played with the clarinet sometimes playing into the piano to create the harmonics as the strings sympatheically vibrated. Again, I can't really do that with Garritan PO.

    For those that are wondering, this was all rendered through FINALE 2008, no DAW was used. This was all manipulated with Kontakt Player 2 and the GArritan Personal Orchestra through notation in Finale.
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  8. #8

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    This is cool. It is spacey but retains enough focus that I feel a common thread, a story line. Very enjoyable and a nice rendering too.
    Best regards,

    Little Red King
    http://luridcactus.com/MusicPage.html

  9. #9
    Senior Member sosmus's Avatar
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    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Bill:
    I am not a gambler but I'd feel safe betting that you are a skilled composer with a sense of humor and whimsy. Your ending (or lack of) gave you away. If it is this much fun to listen too, then it must be even more fun to play.
    (it is an alleatoric score, so I wrote it the way I would have played if I could play clarinet.) It uses multi-phonics which sound much better in Garritan's library than in real performance. It's a whimsical piece but tough to take if you do not like this style of atonalism (clusters not chords, idioms not melodies - though there is the hint of melody and harmony in it to help hold it all together.)
    I couldn't resist so I looked in the Oxford Dictionary of Music and found this:
    "Aleatory Music (from Lat. 'alea' dice: hence the throw of the dice for chance). Synonym for *indeterminacy, i.e. mus. that cannot be predicted before performance or music which was composed through chance procedures (statistical or computerized). The adjective 'aleatoric' is a bastard word, to be avoided by those who care for language."
    For myself, I don't give a d--- what you called it and liked it anyway.

    Pleas do not throw objects at me after listening - you have been warned!!!!
    I was thinking of tossing you a "Bravo" or two.

    Steve

  10. #10

    Re: Capricious Clarinet

    Little Red King - thanks for listening and I am glad you enjoyed this venture into the mystical realm of chance music. It would sound similar but different everytime it is performed.

    Steve - I am honored that you listened. I have always admired your music. I think music should be fun for the performer as well as for the listener. I always try t make that happen. I hate pieces that are 'stodgy' just to be 'stodgy'. Actually, even though it is a 'bastardized' term, 'alleatoric' is often the way this type of chance music is described. I did not use dice, but the score is written in a way that gives a lot of liberty to the performers. They decide when things start or stop or how fast or slow sections are played. Much of the score is 'non'misure' (not measured - or 'no time signatures').

    I really appreciate you stopping by for a listen.

    Thanks,
    Bill
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

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