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Topic: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

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  1. #1

    Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    See this

    http://www.nujij.nl/superstring.3153218.lynkx

    and click on the top-movie.

    I was delighted to hear that the french horn was part of of this lecture.
    So with a little patience and effort we can produce multi-dimensional music.
    Gary, new sampling methods are needed!!!!!!!


    Raymond

  2. #2

    Re: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    intriguingly cosmic indeed

    Btw, where can you get these supers strings? I just snapped my G while playing Bach
    Regards Danial Zainali
    ___
    Reinvent powdered wigs!

  3. #3

    Re: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    Quote Originally Posted by Felixissimo View Post
    intriguingly cosmic indeed

    Btw, where can you get these supers strings? I just snapped my G while playing Bach
    Here! See this

    Raymond

  4. #4

    Re: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymond62 View Post
    Here! See this

    Raymond


    Oh yeah!
    Regards Danial Zainali
    ___
    Reinvent powdered wigs!

  5. #5

    Re: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    E=MC2 - but I have to admit, a convincing lecture. I hope the adrons have insurance!
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  6. #6

    Re: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    Superstring theory is quite an interesting theory. For those that don't understand what it is, it is actually a simple grand unification theory. It simply states that all four fundamental forces and all matter and energy are composed of tiny, subatomic multi-dimensional strings. The only problem superstring theory has before it can become universally accepted as a plausible theory is the fact that gravity (one of the fundamental forces) exists only on the level of general relativity (our universe) and the forces of electromagnetism, weak nuclear, and strong nuclear exist mainly within the quantum, or subatomic universe. The fact that gravity exists at a different level than the other three fundamental forces is easily explained by the separation of the unified fundamental force during the events proposed and supported by the Big Bang Theory. Simply stated, during the Planck epoch, the fundamental forces existed in unison. However, shortly after, about 10^-43 to 10^-36 seconds after the big bang, the grand unification epoch occurred and gravity, strangely, broke off. Shortly after, the other forces started breaking apart, ending up at the subatomic and level and ending up much stronger. However, it is supported by string theory that gravity still exists on a subatomic level, possibly as an undiscovered particle referred to as the Higgs Boson (sometimes called the God Particle). Essentially, if the Higgs Boson exists, then gravity exists at the subatomic level and superstring theory is proven plausible. If it doesn't exist, then superstring theory is no longer a theory and is tossed into the failures of the ages.

    The experiments to prove the existance of the Higgs Boson and the validity of Superstring Theory are currently being tested at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN facility that lies on the border of France and Switzerland. I'm personally going to keep updated on the LHC as they have just activated it and are starting to perform the experiments that will decide the fate of superstring theory.
    Colton J. Provias
    Film Score Composer, Location Sound Mixer, and Sound Editor
    Full-stack Web Developer

  7. #7

    Re: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    String theory may be, or may not be, the question, or the answer, or not. If you keep up to date (Scientific American, New Scientist etc) you'll see that there is a new theory every other week. I believe the latest concerns the idea of concurrent multiverses, including those where light is black or dark at least.

    If they get a black hole we're all doomed anyway.

    This is just as likely, (or not) based on Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle (or not): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Spaghetti_Monster
    Derek
    Things may come and things may go but the art school dance goes on forever
    NOW WITH Cubase 5, JABB,GPO, Fender Strat, Ibanez RG, Yamaha Fretless Bass, Framus Archtop, The Trumpet and Mr T Sax, together with GREEN SEALING WAX


  8. #8

    Re: Maybe interesting for the scientists among us

    Quote Originally Posted by buckshead View Post
    String theory may be, or may not be, the question, or the answer, or not. If you keep up to date (Scientific American, New Scientist etc) you'll see that there is a new theory every other week. I believe the latest concerns the idea of concurrent multiverses, including those where light is black or dark at least.
    There are always new theories appearing. But, it comes down to the definitions of the terms. In the end, most of these "theories" you hear about are just simply a hypothesis or conclusion that has been barely tested and is being paraded as a theory. A hypothesis is a guess as to what the conclusion may be. The conclusion is the result derived from one test. A theory is a result derived from many tests and is proven true. The problem is that these "theories" are being presented only after one or a small group of scientists have tested it. There have usually been no other experiments performed to check the validity, thus why the validity of the theory is unknown.

    Quote Originally Posted by buckshead View Post
    If they get a black hole we're all doomed anyway.
    Another universe getting a blackhole and affecting all other universes would show superstring theory as possibly being true as for this occurrence to take place, the Higgs Boson subatomic particle should exist, thus explaining the cross-universe interaction as quantum mechanics would explain this behavior. In quantum mechanics, particles can travel multidimensionally and through other universes (thus somewhat explaining why the particles behave in such a curious manner).

    Quote Originally Posted by buckshead View Post
    This is just as likely, (or not) based on Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle (or not): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flying_Spaghetti_Monster
    The Flying Spaghetti Monster is, of course, a joke. Yet, comparing it to Hisenburg's Uncertainty Principle seems a little far from the point. Hisenburg's Uncertainty Principle has been proven true on many occasions and causes headaches to scientists who look into developing items like a teleportation device.
    Colton J. Provias
    Film Score Composer, Location Sound Mixer, and Sound Editor
    Full-stack Web Developer

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