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Topic: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

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  1. #1

    Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Hi everyone,

    thanks again for all your support on my mom's passing.

    This is a work-in-progress, and there are many things missing, both horizontally and vertically (like an ending!). But with a more complex work like this, I tend to map out the skeleton, and then sit and obsess about the details for a month or so. So, forgive the awkward transitions, bum notes and weird chord changes for now.

    This is, for me, an exercise in writing a symphony in the more traditional form, using more structure and development techniques of a motive...

    The ending (not there yet) will recap the begining motive somehow.

    I posted this in a much earlier form before; have added quite a bit since then....
    As always, thanks for listening.

    http://soundclick.com/share?songid=6697752
    _____________________
    Listen at: www.soundclick.com/kepeaceusa
    Scores at: http://stores.lulu.com/ke_peace

  2. #2
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    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Karen,

    This is really great work, serious, full and expansive. Very nice scoring and production throughout!!

    Gary

    www.garybricault.com

  3. #3

    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Hi Karen,

    I'm enjoying the very nice work on your symphony so far. You've got some wonderful textures and melodies going throughout, and a lot of fertile ground on which to grow the rest of the movements. You seem to have a real knack for counterpoint and rhythmic interest.

    I hope you continue to develop this and let us hear the other movements. I want to see where it leads you.
    - Jamie Kowalski

    All Hands Music - Kowalski on the web
    The Ear Is Always Correct - Writings on composition

  4. #4

    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Hi Karen,

    Nice horn sectional almost, triumphal. Running woodwinds remind me of John Williams use or is it Strauss. I'm thankful for a well constructed plan. Your planning is excellent so far. I believe many composers overlook planning.

    Thanks for posting and I look forward to hearing more of this,
    John

  5. #5
    Senior Member valhalx's Avatar
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    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Karen,

    You're off to a great start on this. Great use of melody and counterpoint. Very rich orchestration, too. I enjoyed it a lot when you kicked it up at ~2:58. My only comment compositionally would be, you might consider an occasional pause for dramatic effect.

    Keep us updated on this. This is excellent. How many movements do you plan?

    Bill
    Never look at the trombones. It only encourages them. Richard Strauss

    My Website
    Beethoven's Eroica
    Antonio Salieri
    The History of Studebaker

  6. #6
    Senior Member sosmus's Avatar
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    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Karen ;
    . So, forgive the awkward transitions, bum notes and weird chord changes for now.
    You are forgiven!
    This is, for me, an exercise in writing a symphony in the more traditional form, using more structure and development techniques of a motive...
    For someone who professes to be lacking in the basic theoretical musical skills, you certainly handle such things as the fugal/canonical entrances,some marvelous WW passages and those majestic horn pronouncements like a true master.


    The ending (not there yet) will recap the begining motive somehow.
    Statement, digression, restatement. Words (and a plan) to live by.

    As I listen I just shake my head in wonderment and admiration.

    Steve


  7. #7

    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Karen

    I have composed many symphonic pieces, but have never had the time to try to compose an old style symphony. This follows very well within the confines of a true Symphony and you should be very proud.

    I would say you easily have the beginning of a great piece.

    Well done

    Ron
    "Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein

    http://composersforum.ning.com/profile/RonaldFerguson

  8. #8

    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Karen,

    You know what this sounds like to me? It sounds like you're on the verge of a breakthrough (or actually already made one)! We've had those discussions about "taking chances" and eliminating fear from the process. The trick, of course, is knowing when and how to take those chances. This piece definitely demonstrates to us your willingness to "go there"; this has just the right amount -- and the right kind -- of surprises at just the right spots.

    My only suggestions so far: a touch more of percussion for sonic variety and maybe a slight emphasis on a couple of the meter changes. Also, I think Bill (valhalx) has a good point about the pauses (not necessarily literal ones; something that maybe just briefly lies static harmonically/rhythmically)... kind of like when you're eating a fantastic meal at a great restaurant -- occasionally you want to just sit back and let your palette savor what you've eaten thus far before you dig in again. You have a lot of great things in this for the ear to savor! (I say all this, of course, fully realizing that you're not finished with this movement.)

    My favorite spots: the low woodwinds (bassoon, etc.) entrance about a minute or so in. Really dramatic! Also, those woodwind staggered, "bubbly" ascending lines at about 3:55. How cool!!!

    This piece should definitely have you saying, "I'm a composer"! Keep on this track, and this is going to be something special (it already is!).

    Danny

  9. #9

    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Thank you Gary, Jamie, John, Bill, Steve, Ron and Danny for taking the time to listen and respond.

    I have added a lot to this now. (It's still at the same link as the first post in this thread). It is still not "done-done" but it is almost complete in form, just some additional layers, ornaments, fill-in-the-cracks and smooth it out where needed, I think.

    To respond to some of your comments and questions:

    Jamie: "You seem to have a real knack for counterpoint and rhythmic interest."

    Thanks, Jamie. I think that is one of my stronger points -- the weaker being harmony (though I am gradually trying to remedy that.) I "hear" the interplay of rhythms in my mind far better than I can hear all but the most basic harmonies -- anything beyond that, I have to play around in Finale til I hear something that sounds right to me. IE, I can often recognize the harmony I want when I hear it, but I can't yet hear it clearly enough in my mind to simply write it down. And then again, frankly, sometimes a happy accident happens and I leave it at that LOL!

    John: "Your planning is excellent so far. I believe many composers overlook planning."

    Thanks John... structure and planning has not been a strong point of mine so far either, so this is partly an exercise in doing more of that, using a more traditional approach to a "symphony". I am also just discovering (ie, being told) of what instruments today's typical symphony orchestra consists. ("What three trombones? four horns?), so I am making use of that here as well. It may seem strange that I didn't know that, but that is because of my lack of traditional musical education, and the fact that I don't play an instrument in an orchestra.
    Bill: "...Very rich orchestration, too. I enjoyed it a lot when you kicked it up at ~2:58. My only comment compositionally would be, you might consider an occasional pause for dramatic effect."

    Thanks, Bill. I have added more layers to the orchestration; see what you think if you have a chance. Yes, I like the "wild stuff" -- I can't seem to keep a piece of any length just calm and placid. Go figure LOL! I thought about your suggestion of a pause (you mean in the fast section, yes?) and I couldn't think of where to do that without feeling like I was killing the momentum. Could you tell me more about ways to do that effectively? I'm open to suggestions!

    Danny: My only suggestions so far: a touchmore of percussion for sonic variety and maybe a slight emphasis on a couple of the meter changes.

    I’ve added more percussion; see what you think. It does add a lot, I think.

    Danny: Also, I think Bill (valhalx) has a good point about the pauses (not necessarily literal ones; something that maybe just briefly lies static harmonically/rhythmically)... kind of like when you're eating a fantastic meal at a great restaurant -- occasionally you want to just sit back and let your palette savor what you've eaten thus far before you dig in again.

    Thanks, that helps. I’ll have to “stew” over that a bit. (pun intended, hehe).

    And Steve, as usual, you are far too kind (but I’m not complaining!!)

    Thanks again everyone for listening. I really am going through some big changes, especially trying to listen to the masters more and understand the interleaving of themes and how they do that so effectively, and how a theme is developed. I’ll probably never be able to analyze it, but maybe I can absorb it more intuitively. Dave (etLux) once told me to listen to Tsaikovsky and Stravinsky at the same time. That helped my mind get used to hearing the way the masters interleave and play with different themes.

    Karen
    _____________________
    Listen at: www.soundclick.com/kepeaceusa
    Scores at: http://stores.lulu.com/ke_peace

  10. #10

    Re: Symphony No. 3 in C minor mv 1

    Hiya Karen,

    Dang. A little late to the party, and I'm getting a
    dead link. SoundClick reports...

    404 - File or directory not found.
    The resource you are looking for might have been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.


    Best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

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