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Topic: Sonivox vs VSL

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  1. #1

    Sonivox vs VSL

    Hello

    I would like to expand my Sample-Libraries. I've already the VSL Special Edition Extended.

    My questions:

    - Would you buy some more VSL-Sample-Libraries or another Complete Orchestral Library - like the Sonivox Complete Symphonic Collection?

    - Have you got some experiences with the Sonivox Library? Is it advisable?

    The Sonivox Strings sounds really good, but this Library is very old.
    My musicstyle is between pop and classical - like musicals.

    Thanks for your reply!

  2. #2

    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    If you have the VSL Special Editions, you have your bread and butter instruments. But I would add the Sonivox Strings -- those sonic implants strings are a classic, and they blend perfectly with VI stuff. Also, to this day, you can't beat their espressivo, staccato and spiccato patches. That stuff is gold: it'll never go out of style. These purchases alone will pretty much serve any orchestral need you have.

    kerry

  3. #3

    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    I'm a hobby user who bought the Sonivox symphonic library a few years back, and I am happy to report that the other sections of this library are of an equal high quality as the renowned string section. That said, I don't think I would invest in the full Sonivox library, if I were you. You already have a great-sounding orchestra in VSL SE, after all.

    IMO it would be better to be more selective in the way you spend your money. Look at each orchestral section in VI SE and ask yourself if there is something on the market that is better, or if you can get something which, blended with what you already have, will improve the sound of the particular section.

    For strings, I would also suggest Sonivox.
    EDIT: Not to replace any of VSL's strings, but to blend with them.

    For woodwinds, you already have VSL, which reigns supreme when it comes to woodwinds, especially the legato. Sonivox'es woodwind section also sounds very good, and is probably among the best out there, but VSL's just has more warmth and "realism".

    For brass, perhaps add The Trumpet to your palette?

    For percussion, if you feel you need more of this, look into Project SAM True Strike 1 as well as the stuff from Cinesamples (Drums of War and that other library they have). Stormdrum 2 is also a good choice.

    Anyway, I hope you will be happy with whatever you choose.
    Wish it was me, who had money to spend!

    Best regards,
    Henrik

  4. #4
    Senior Member mahlon's Avatar
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    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    I think Henrik's advice is very good and spot on. To selectively add to your VSL SE orchestra is the better approach imo. I'd like to add the sonviox strings myself someday -- but just added symphobia; the wallet is much lighter now....

  5. #5

    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    Sonnivox strings rock. Cant do without them.

  6. #6

    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    Thanks a lot at all!

    What do you think about "Symphobia"?
    If I purchase Symphobia, I would also have great strings - like Sonivox (?) - and good brasses.
    I know the instruments by Symphobia are not alone - just in ensembles.
    But the soloinstruments I have them by my VSL SE.
    What do you think?

    Best regards
    Periax

  7. #7
    Senior Member mahlon's Avatar
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    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    periax,
    I've recently purchased Symphobia for the exact reason that you are asking. I haven't had a chance to really put it through it's paces, so to speak, so take my opinion with a grain of salt.

    The libraries I'll be mixing Symphobia with are:
    VSL Brass 1
    VSL Woodwinds 1
    VSL Chamber Strings
    VSL Solo Strings
    VSL Appassionata Strings
    VSL Harp
    Various VSL downloaded instr.
    Miroslav Vitous Symph. Orchestra
    Peter Siedlachek Advanced Orchestra
    WIVI
    TrueStrike 1

    Just playing around with Symphobia by itself, it's easy to see that it is definitely geared towards a certain method of composing. And it has it's limitations if you are trying to make it more than what it is.

    It sounds absolutely fantastic, though, in terms of quality of the actual realism of sound. My initial feeling is that it will mix very well to support other libraries. But by itself there are a few factors if you're trying to do intricate orchestration. For instance, several of the string patches top out (violins top note) at 3 E's above middle C. This is quite high for most situations, but you're always going to run into that situation where you want those strings to go on up. I don't have Kontakt 3 (just the player), so this could fix that range upwards maybe? Someone who has Kontakt 3 with Symph can chime in....?

    This is particularly disappointing because it is true on one of the most useful and beautiful violin patches. On the regular and dynamic sustain patches, however, the range DOES extend much higher. And like I said, the strings are beautiful and very dynamic.

    I've only started to experiment layering patches for the strings, and surely this where much of the power of symphobia not evident at first will shine.

    So, all in all, when I FIRST opened Symphobia and popped it in, I was a little frightened because though I knew and had steeled myself that this was a different library and approach to orchestrating midi, I still had that natural reaction of "Uh oh". After a while playing with it though, I see that it will be an invaluable tool to both quickly add supporing parts and to create some gorgeous string lines and powerful brass lines.

    This is to mention nothing of the effects which I haven't even delved into yet.

    I can't say whether you should get Symphobia to complement your existing orchestra or not. You ask a tough question. I know Symphobia would add tremendous sound to your pallet. But I think, if I were you, I would also consider expanding your strings to Appassionata. And if you had enough funds for the entire Sonivox orchestra, then that might be the way to go. It's often good to plan for the 'long run'. Say for instance that you'll buy Symphobia this year, and then add some Sonivox Strings next year, and so on. New libraries always come out, but a long term plan is good I think.

    I feel sure, though, that Symphobia would give your VSL SE a punch up! And of course, it's great on its own too.

    Anyway, just some long winded thoughs coming from someone who wants to use Sypmobia mostly as an addendum to already existing libraries. I'll let you know if I end up using it more on its own, too.

    Good Luck
    M.

  8. #8

    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    I second Henrik's advice. I've heard great things about the Sonivox samples but they have not added anything new to the lib in years. Sonivox seems to be one of the only companies that is not really updating their libs. Of course great sound never becomes obsolete but I'm sure they would benefit, sales wise, by adding more articulations etc. Also, there prices are pretty darn high compared to Kirk Hunter, EWQL, Garritan etc.

    I too have VSL and want to get the expanded set 1st off. (I also own EWQL Gold Pro XP and Silver for orch stuff) I love VSL! Especially the interface. THey are pricey as well but VSL definitely are the Rolls Royce of both samples and playability IMHO.

    I think you may want to follow Henrik's advice and select a few premium instruments to add to your collection. I've been burned numerous times by trying to do the "bulk" buy.

    Best of luck!

    Darren
    www.darrenpasdernick.com
    "Every time you play a wrong note God kills a kitten."

  9. #9

    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    Quote Originally Posted by dpasdernick View Post
    I second Henrik's advice. I've heard great things about the Sonivox samples but they have not added anything new to the lib in years. Sonivox seems to be one of the only companies that is not really updating their libs. Of course great sound never becomes obsolete but I'm sure they would benefit, sales wise, by adding more articulations etc. Also, there prices are pretty darn high compared to Kirk Hunter, EWQL, Garritan etc.
    Oops, so many musicans love to play on a hundret years old Stradivari.... .

    Without joking, the sound of this great Sonivox-string-library is one of the best I have ever heared!

    Perhaps Sonivoxmi are working on something new here? I think they don`t sleep.

    Gunther
    "Music is the shorthand of emotion." Leo Tolstoy

    Listen to me, tuning my triangle http://www.box.net/shared/ae822u6r3i

  10. #10

    Re: Sonivox vs VSL

    I agree with the above mentioned statements regarding the Sonivox Strings. They are a "classic" and an amazing addition to any composer's palette. I use them on every film score.

    Mr. A.
    Nuendo 3/ Cubase 4.5 on XP sp2 QuadCore 2.66 Ghz VisionDaw Built DAW RME HDSP 96/52 into ProTools HD3 (digi192x6) on MacPro 3 Ghz... Farm PCs x (6) VisionDaw Machines PC Dual 2.66 Ghz w- Kontakt 3.5 w/ UAD Cards Midi Over Lan

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