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Topic: Editing Key-Switches in Score Editor

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  1. #1

    Editing Key-Switches in Score Editor

    Hi,

    I found a nice tutorial on YouTube by Pete Thomas:
    http://de.youtube.com/watch?v=b7loe4uPuuE
    http://de.youtube.com/watch?v=nGRNxaOK71o

    It shows how to edit keyswitches in Logics Score-Editor.
    Didn't know that this works. :-?

    The Combo Remapper for Logic is available on Petes site:
    http://www.petethomas.co.uk/logic-keyswitch-notes.html


    Chris Hein
    Chris Hein - Horns / Chris Hein - Guitars / Chris Hein - Bass
    http://www.chrishein.net

  2. #2

    Re: Editing Key-Switches in Score Editor

    awesome find Chris,
    thanks for sharing it!


    Hans

  3. #3

    Re: Editing Key-Switches in Score Editor

    While this is very clever, and the Frizzell-Wiedmann partners have an Environment layer that has carried this approach far beyond Pete's to unbelievable possibilities, it has always been my belief that you are far better off keeping a separate Logic file for score printout from the one that "sounds right."

    Personally, once I start working on the score prep, I never want to think about what it does to the sound in making my graphical decisions.

    As always, YMMV.
    Composer, Logic Certified Trainer, Level 2,
    author of "Going Pro with Logic Pro 9."

    www.jayasher.com

  4. #4

    Re: Editing Key-Switches in Score Editor

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashermusic View Post
    While this is very clever, and the Frizzell-Wiedmann partners have an Environment layer that has carried this approach far beyond Pete's to unbelievable possibilities, it has always been my belief that you are far better off keeping a separate Logic file for score printout from the one that "sounds right."
    Yes, but that isn't quite the point. I developed this not so my scores would sound the way they look (though that would be a beneficial) side effect), but to make the use of articulation keyswitches easier. I find it's a pain to use notes out of the range of the instrument, CC data or program changes as you can't see at a glance what they are doing in any editor.

    All I wanted was to see the word "pizzicato" for instance and know it's a keyswitch. The fact that it's in the score is because (apart from the event list) that's the only place you can have words - it would be nice to be able to add text to the piano roll or hyper edit and have it do what it says, ie switch the articulation. I just got fed up thinking "now, is C#1 marcato or staccato?". Not to mention the pain of making sure the C#1 is a few ticks before the actual instrument note it's supposed to affect.

    The whole point of this was not to go any deeper and get too involved in dynamics etc as the FW system does, but to create a simple tool that can be used by people without a vast knowledge of the environment and is aimed at simplifying and speeding up the workflow and hence the creativity.

    PS, thanks for the link Chris - I've added a couple more videos. One on dealing with bugs in Logic and another on using the same remapper with more than one instrument.

  5. #5

    Re: Editing Key-Switches in Score Editor

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Thomas View Post
    Yes, but that isn't quite the point. I developed this not so my scores would sound the way they look (though that would be a beneficial) side effect), but to make the use of articulation keyswitches easier. I find it's a pain to use notes out of the range of the instrument, CC data or program changes as you can't see at a glance what they are doing in any editor.

    All I wanted was to see the word "pizzicato" for instance and know it's a keyswitch. The fact that it's in the score is because (apart from the event list) that's the only place you can have words - it would be nice to be able to add text to the piano roll or hyper edit and have it do what it says, ie switch the articulation. I just got fed up thinking "now, is C#1 marcato or staccato?". Not to mention the pain of making sure the C#1 is a few ticks before the actual instrument note it's supposed to affect.

    The whole point of this was not to go any deeper and get too involved in dynamics etc as the FW system does, but to create a simple tool that can be used by people without a vast knowledge of the environment and is aimed at simplifying and speeding up the workflow and hence the creativity.

    PS, thanks for the link Chris - I've added a couple more videos. One on dealing with bugs in Logic and another on using the same remapper with more than one instrument.
    OK, I understand, Pete. Then well done sir, in meeting your objective!

    Now if Logic would just properly chase these events, I would be happy :0
    Composer, Logic Certified Trainer, Level 2,
    author of "Going Pro with Logic Pro 9."

    www.jayasher.com

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