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Topic: And a snaretetic question as well...

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  1. #1

    And a snaretetic question as well...

    here I go again..

    If I have in my score both a drum kit part and a snare drum part (well, really a percussion part but with of course the snare drum in it) which never plays at the same time, could I integrate the snare drum part into the drum kit part? The reason I'm asking is because I've seen scores similar to mine with seperate parts, do the drummer read from two parts? Or is the snare drumming left to someone else? For the sake of simplicity I think that one part should do it, but I'm no percussionist so I need to ask
    Regards Danial Zainali
    ___
    Reinvent powdered wigs!

  2. #2

    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    Quote Originally Posted by Felixissimo View Post
    here I go again..

    If I have in my score both a drum kit part and a snare drum part (well, really a percussion part but with of course the snare drum in it) which never plays at the same time, could I integrate the snare drum part into the drum kit part? The reason I'm asking is because I've seen scores similar to mine with seperate parts, do the drummer read from two parts? Or is the snare drumming left to someone else? For the sake of simplicity I think that one part should do it, but I'm no percussionist so I need to ask
    With orchestral percussion you can pretty much specify who does what, as long as you're clear....then they'll pretty much ignore you and find a more economic way to do it. If they never play at the same time, there's a good chance that one player would be asked to read both parts anyway.
    David

  3. #3
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    First, there are no such entity as a percussionist. They are just bottom feeders.

    Anywho, in my experience one part is printed out for each percussionist assigned to a certain percussion instrument. Although! I have had the fortunate experience to play two parts which was fairly doable except when parts play together for long periods the same rhythmic value. Which can be done as long as the tempo is not too fast. Then again, what is too fast?

    Do you understand what I am saying? Hmm, I don't. Then again ... I don't do this sort of stuff anymore since I lost my mind.
    Styxx

  4. #4
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    If I have in my score both a drum kit part and a snare drum part
    Wait, the drum kit has snare as well, yes? Am I correct to assume the "snare drum part" is separately playing another rhythmic value or? Clue me in sir.
    Styxx

  5. #5

    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    Quote Originally Posted by Styxx View Post
    Wait, the drum kit has snare as well, yes? Am I correct to assume the "snare drum part" is separately playing another rhythmic value or? Clue me in sir.
    Yes and no, I think...
    There's only one snare drum available so yes I guess it's on the drum kit.
    But as I said (I think ) the drum accompaniment and the snare drum never plays at the same time, so because the snare drum is right next to the drummer he might as well play the snare drum part once he finished the previously drumming stuff, I think... Am I right or have I completly lost it?

    let me demonstrate...
    the drum kit starts: boom shack shacka boom boom shack, the the drum kit has a rest and meanwhile the snare drum goes: ratatatatata!
    So the question is really since this is the pattern throughout the piece if I can merge the drum kit and snare part onto one piece of paper?
    Regards Danial Zainali
    ___
    Reinvent powdered wigs!

  6. #6
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    Ya better tune those drums!

    In answer to your question
    since this is the pattern throughout the piece if I can merge the drum kit and snare part onto one piece of paper?
    I can't see why not. I wouldn't have a problem with it as long as both snare parts (on the drum set & on the second snare) do not overlap.

    Quite a few years ago I was asked to play percussion for a concert with West Side Story score involved. We started out with seven percussionist but as rehearsals grew fewer most of the seven left. As a matter of fact, all but two quit before the concert. I shared several parts with the other percussionist who played all drum set parts and some. What a mess it was for the remaining rehearsals but we got it together just fine by concert day.

    I know I played Bass Drum, cymbals, snare and various other percussion instruments and some with the left and right hand simultaneously. I have to say, I don't remember much of the experience except for a few thousand gray hairs by end of the concert.

    Percussion ensemble in college there were plenty of opportunities to play more than one including set plus side drums.

    So, with that lengthy boring account of my past meaningless experiences, yes ... go right ahead! Ya have my blessings.
    Styxx

  7. #7

    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    Hello,

    I would say that how you do the parts is based on the ensemble. Is this a Big Band piece? An orchestra piece with drum kit?

    When I organize percussion parts I utilize as few players as possible that cover the maximum instruments in my orchestration, with directions; "to Triangle," "to Suspended Cymbal," etc. and enough time for the player to move. I have been fortunate enough to write for ensembles whose drummers play everything - pitched and non-pitched so switching instruments is fairly easy. There are loose conventions for orchestrating pit orchestras and big bands as well as orchestras or wind ensembles/concert bands with or without drum kit. Knowing what type of ensemble this is written for would help.

    Without knowing the ensemble - if you don't mind keeping the same snare sound I would keep the snare part in the kit part - it minimizes personnel and saves alot of hassle.

    Good luck!
    In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is.

    http://reberclark.blogspot.com http://reberclark.bandcamp.com http://www.youtube.com/reberclark

  8. #8

    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    Hi Danial,

    Well, it depends on what you want. Short of that, it depends on the number of players and instruments that will be available, although spare snare drums are rather plentiful out there in the real world, as opposed to say, a glass harmonica or an octave of crotales.

    The "economic" answer, as others have suggested, is to combine the parts. As you describe it, there's no reason the kit player can't cover the snare... if that's what you actually want.

    However, under the scenario you've indicated, some composers might actually prefer the back and forth effect of kit and solo snare for both the visual and stereo auditory effects. If your intent musically is that the kit and snare are trading licks back and forth, then, ideally, you would score two players playing separate parts, with the assumption that they would be situated at least a couple yards apart and maybe even on opposite sides of the ensemble.

    If this is something you are looking for, but not sure of the available resources, then perhaps the safest approach would be to make separate parts, but with the solo snare part cued into the kit part in the case that a second player is unavailable.

  9. #9

    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    Quote Originally Posted by DarwinKopp View Post
    Hi Danial,

    Well, it depends on what you want. Short of that, it depends on the number of players and instruments that will be available, although spare snare drums are rather plentiful out there in the real world, as opposed to say, a glass harmonica or an octave of crotales.

    The "economic" answer, as others have suggested, is to combine the parts. As you describe it, there's no reason the kit player can't cover the snare... if that's what you actually want.

    However, under the scenario you've indicated, some composers might actually prefer the back and forth effect of kit and solo snare for both the visual and stereo auditory effects. If your intent musically is that the kit and snare are trading licks back and forth, then, ideally, you would score two players playing separate parts, with the assumption that they would be situated at least a couple yards apart and maybe even on opposite sides of the ensemble.

    If this is something you are looking for, but not sure of the available resources, then perhaps the safest approach would be to make separate parts, but with the solo snare part cued into the kit part in the case that a second player is unavailable.
    I hear what you're saying but I also have to take in acount the fact that I only have 3 percussionists available. My idea was to have the first at the timpani (which has a lot to do in this piece), the second on the drum kit (thus, including the snare) and the third to take care of the additional percussion toys that is needed throughout the piece. The thing is if I seperate the drum kit and snare drum as two parts then this means that I have 4 different percussion parts on 3 persons. Normally this would'nt be a problem but in my case there are sections were all 4 parts would be playing at the same time, therefore I was thinking that by leaving only one part per percussionist I would make it easier.
    Regards Danial Zainali
    ___
    Reinvent powdered wigs!

  10. #10

    Re: And a snaretetic question as well...

    --humm. I don't quite get it. You're saying there's a "drum kit" part and a "snare drum" part - um, but the snare is part of a standard drum kit.

    "...boom shack shacka boom boom shack, the the drum kit has a rest and meanwhile the snare drum goes: ratatatatata!..."

    The drum kit Isn't resting - it's just going to switch to only the "shacka" part without the "boom." - Right? - I mean, if I had a standard drum kit, and we come to a section where I want just Wood Blocks - I'd still have it in the same staves. Wood Blocks aren't standard, but still not very unusual for a regular ol vanilla flavored drummer to have - they're mounted on a stand, he switches from thrashing the snare to thrashing the blocks - and so, by illustration, I'm saying that switching to just one part of the kit, in your case, the Snare- that's a pretty typical situationl. It's the same player, the same drum kit - - right?

    Randy B.

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