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Topic: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

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  1. #1

    Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Here is a new work. Been at this for a good month now. It is the first movement of a Piano Concerto. It is based on the golden ratio (1.61.....).

    I hope you enjoy listening to:

    The Golden Mean Mvmt. I

    And here is a link to all 3 movements together along with just the 3rd movement.

    Piano Concerto Op. 1
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  2. #2

    Thumbs up Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    Here is a new work. Been at this for a good month now. It is the first movement of a Piano Concerto. It is based on the golden ratio (1.61.....).

    I hope you enjoy listening to:

    The Golden Mean Mvmt. I
    I can hear that you're telling a story here, Rich!

    It's both atonal and melodic at the same time, like Stravinsky!
    What a subtle mad waltz, with untertones reminding me of "Le Sacre!"

    The quiet middle sections contrast very well with the dynamic main accentuated rhythm!

    Thanks Rich for this spontaneous and well orchestrated piece!

    Fred

  3. #3
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    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    This is a very fine composition. I too found some similarities to Stravinsky. It has well-defined theme that grows on you as you listen.

    I thought the orchestration was exceptionally well done with timbral combinations that were sometimes delicate sometimes forceful, but always emotional and clear.

    I'm curious as to just how the golden ratio was used - did it (some mathematical formula) suggest all/some of melody and harmony and rhythm - or what? If it isn't a secret .

    Very well done.

    Herb

  4. #4

    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Rich:

    Very well done. Great "dynamic" variety in the score and
    a lot of great imaginative lines. For this piece, I really
    liked the instrumentation.

    The piano solo does his job very nicely. Very modern, but
    not objectionable. Listening to a piano concerto in 3-4 time
    was a new experience for me. Definitely productive.


    BRAVO,

    Jack
    Jack Cannon--MacBook Pro (2015, 13") GPO4/5, JABB3, Auth. STEINWAY, YAMAHA CFX, Gofriller CELLO, Stradivari VIOLIN, COMB2, WORLD, HARPS, PIPE ORGANS, FINALE 2014.5, Mac Pro 2.66 GHz CPU, 8 GB RAM, DP 9.5, MOTU Traveler, MOTU Micro Express, MacBook Pro (2012, 13") 2.2 Ghz CPU, 8 GB RAM.

  5. #5

    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Rich,

    This is the first piece I listen to after my little «sabbatique». I found it captivating and full of life. I enjoyed it very much and I am looking forward to the other movements. Bravo !
    Kind Regards

    Louis Dekker
    My Music Site

    Pour être grand, il faut avoir été petit.

  6. #6

    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Fredrik,

    Thanks very much for those nice comments,

    It's both atonal and melodic at the same time, like Stravinsky!
    What a subtle mad waltz, with untertones reminding me of "Le Sacre!"
    Comparing this to Stravinsky? I am flattered. He is one of my favorites and maybe some of my listening and studying of his music has rubbed off onto my writing skills. Certainly not a bad composer to emulate!

    I am glad you enjoyed the piece.
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  7. #7

    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Euler,

    I'm curious as to just how the golden ratio was used - did it (some mathematical formula) suggest all/some of melody and harmony and rhythm - or what? If it isn't a secret .
    Thanks for listening and taking time to comment. This is much appreciated.

    As for your question:

    I took the positive solution to the equation for the golden ratio "1.6180339887498948482045868343656381177203091 80" and grouped the numbers to the right of the decimal point in twos giving this grouping:

    61 80 33 98 87 49 89 48 48 20 etc...

    I then took those numbers in and made a grid for base 12. (There are 12 chromatic notes in a scale.) Then I converted each two number pair into a note. i.e. 61 = Db; 80 = Ab; 33 = A; 98 = D etc.

    I came up with a pattern of 23 notes. I also grouped the notes in fours, e.g. the 1st 4 groupings give me Db Ab A D. This is a cluster that I used when those notes were present in strong beats in a measure. I used other clusters for the other notes in the melody. The clusters became the basis for harmonic structure and countermelody reference points. From there I used inversions and retrogrades of patterns to help develop my ideas. The most important part of this process is to mold the piece using my ear for whether things sounded correct together or not. There was no attempt to use classic harmony structure to propel the piece forward, merely the use of consonance and dissonance to give the illusion of harmonic structure. Rhytmic consderation were my interjection into the group of 12 notes that I got from the first 12 notes in the numeric sequence. After all, I had to have some input into the melody! LOL

    If none of that makes sense than I guess it will remain a secret!

    Again thanks for listening, I hope you enjoyed the work.
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    110

    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Quote Originally Posted by RichR View Post
    Thanks for listening and taking time to comment. This is much appreciated.

    As for your question:

    I took the positive solution to the equation for the golden ratio "1.6180339887498948482045868343656381177203091 80" and grouped the numbers to the right of the decimal point in twos giving this grouping:

    61 80 33 98 87 49 89 48 48 20 etc...

    I then took those numbers in and made a grid for base 12. (There are 12 chromatic notes in a scale.) Then I converted each two number pair into a note. i.e. 61 = Db; 80 = Ab; 33 = A; 98 = D etc.

    I came up with a pattern of 23 notes. [ ... ]

    If none of that makes sense than I guess it will remain a secret!

    Again thanks for listening, I hope you enjoyed the work.
    Rich,

    Thanks for explaining - it makes perfect sense. I was thinking of trying a composition based on some number myself (even to writing a small computer program ) so what you have said gives me a starting point.

    Yes I did enjoy the piece - your "human" touch has made it quite musical.

    Herb

  9. #9

    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    I was thinking of trying a composition based on some number myself (even to writing a small computer program ) so what you have said gives me a starting point.
    You don't have to go that far, just have the computer generate a random number. I used to do that in basic, but I'm not sure what the command would be in C++ or newer language. I suppose you could simply use a spreadsheet and set a cell to generate a random number based on some seed that you input.

    Just rambling thoughts...
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  10. #10

    Re: Golden Mean - Piano Concerto

    Rhap2,

    Thanks for the comments, Jack. They are much appreciated.

    Great "dynamic" variety in the score and
    a lot of great imaginative lines
    I especially try to to just this. I am not always successful but it did seem to happen in this piece. I would guess that limiting the players to a minimum group of winds with the string ensemble made it a bit easier to control.
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

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