• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Topic: String Quartet

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    String Quartet

    I know this piece will be difficult for many of you, but I've been taking a class with A teacher who studied with Elliot Carter. We have been working on "freeing up the notes" trying to make barlines disappear and give the piece more 'elasticity'. He is very pleased with this piece I have written as am I. Yes, it's academic, but in its own right, it has a haunting and lonely quality to it. Structure is free as is tonality. There are no bounds or forced restrictions. Parts are alleatoric (freely played by the performer) and parts are notated. It was really fun trying to get Finale to do the alleatoric sections ().

    Anyways, have a listen to

    String Quartet No.1 Opus 1: Movement I

    No, I am not a mental patient, I am a musician (hmm, I guess I am a mental patient!
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  2. #2

    Re: String Quartet

    Bill

    This has some fantastic moments in it.

    You are right that it is not for everyone. Of course I like it, but I am out there as well.

    I don't quite understand why, but at times it seems like you have 5 instruments playing at once. 3 in the left side and 2 in the right.

    It's probably just the extra notes that are running around in my head.

    Well done

    Ron
    "Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein

    http://composersforum.ning.com/profile/RonaldFerguson

  3. #3

    Re: String Quartet

    Quote Originally Posted by rolifer View Post
    Bill
    I don't quite understand why, but at times it seems like you have 5 instruments playing at once. 3 in the left side and 2 in the right.Ron
    I made extensive use of double stops to create that effect.

    I am glad you enjoyed as I knew you would be one of the first to give it a try.

    Thanks for listening to my feeble attempt to mimic Elliot Carter.

    Bill
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  4. #4
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Shelton, Washington State
    Posts
    3,022

    Re: String Quartet

    It's different isn't it. I've heard music that is sort of like this but probably with more structure.

    It makes me think of the looneys that wander the streets in my town.


    In a way it's somewhat disturbing but also calming.



    Phil

  5. #5

    Re: String Quartet

    Fastlane - Thanks for listening. Yes, many people do associate this type of music with disturbing images and mental deffects. Listen to Elliot Carter or Alban Berg, late Stravinsky, Lutoslawski, et al and you will hear some pretty fantastic music.

    Bill
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  6. #6

    Re: String Quartet

    I admit that I am not crazy about the overall style of this, but I certainly can appreciate the interactions with the instruments. I think strings are a great media to express musical ideas in any style. Thanks for posting this.
    -Jay

  7. #7
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Baltimore
    Posts
    1,904

    Re: String Quartet

    Very effective, Bill! You have a multi-movement feel within a unified single movement, and it all hangs together. There is enough motivic repetition to keep the music from becoming confusing. I'm not sure about the aleatoric parts, in two ways: I'm not certain which passages they were, and given the very rhythmic nature of several sections, I'm not sure it makes sense. That's just me, but I think this could be achieved without it - it doesn't seem to need it...
    I think the slides will be effective - I don't like the way they sound here, but then that is almost always the case with samples playing a gliss ( i.e., not your fault!). All that said, I liked this quite a lot - and the ending was beautiful.

    Thanks for sharing this.

    Have a great holiday!
    Ron Pearl

    Website:

    ronaldmpearl.com

    myspace:

    http://myspace.com/rmpearl

  8. #8

    Re: String Quartet

    Quote Originally Posted by rpearl View Post
    I'm not sure about the aleatoric parts, in two ways: I'm not certain which passages they were, and given the very rhythmic nature of several sections, I'm not sure it makes sense.
    Maybe I should post the score to give you an idea of where the alleatoric sections are. Obviously, the computer rendition is not alleatoric (I realzed it as if I were performing, but it would be different if performed with live performers.

    Thanks for listening, Ron

    Jay - Yes, this is a difficult style, especially to maintain. I am going for an 'elasticity' of line (again, hard to render in computer music.)

    Thanks for listening all.

    Bill
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Salisbury, UK
    Posts
    312

    Re: String Quartet

    Although seeking freedom from conventional restrictions, your piece nevertheless does seem to have a conventional structure. Basically ABA. Thematic statement, contrasting material, return to version of original material. This is a good thing, as is so much in established musical convention. If a composition is to avoid being merely a length of sound, there must be some sense of participating in a coherent experience or journey. Which means providing shape. ABA is quite hard to beat. A return to starting point increases the feeling of having been somewhere. I quite liked the piece. It makes good use ofthe capacity of strings to depart from strict tonality. But as with so much music which is atonal and barline free, it seems most suited to expressing stress and disturbance. What happens if, in later movements, there is a requirement to express warmth?

  10. #10

    Re: String Quartet

    Quote Originally Posted by dermod View Post
    Although seeking freedom from conventional restrictions, your piece nevertheless does seem to have a conventional structure. Basically ABA. Thematic statement, contrasting material, return to version of original material. This is a good thing, as is so much in established musical convention. If a composition is to avoid being merely a length of sound, there must be some sense of participating in a coherent experience or journey. Which means providing shape. ABA is quite hard to beat. A return to starting point increases the feeling of having been somewhere. I quite liked the piece. It makes good use ofthe capacity of strings to depart from strict tonality. But as with so much music which is atonal and barline free, it seems most suited to expressing stress and disturbance. What happens if, in later movements, there is a requirement to express warmth?
    Quite perceptive, I am actually working on the second movement which is trying to convey warmth. The instructor doesn't like it because of the "Tonal" overtones, but he admits that it does draw on the warmth of the sting sound. When I have completed it, I will post it.

    I know this is not a 'compositional' forum, but I am a composer first and somewhere down the line are some engineering skills (way down the line). I prefer live performance and making the performer do the work of realization and leaving me out of the loop.

    My Best,
    Bill
    We dream to write and we write to dream.

    Challenge #10 Winner

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •