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Topic: New Piano Trio

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  1. #1

    New Piano Trio

    Hello all, Sorry I am so often away for so long, but getting a Ph.D is a bit....time consuming

    For those interested I have uploaded a new Piano Trio entitled Morning.

    It is composed in a central key with the upper and lower ranges oriented around tonal centers that are a Perfect Fifth above and below (respectively) the tonic of the central key. These "subcenters" move to a major second above and below the central key, and back again, and all of the keys modulate at various points, while retaining these relationships.

    I hope you enjoy
    Matt

    http://www.sibeliusmusic.com/cgi-bin/show_score.pl?com=streammp3&scoreid=134222

  2. #2
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
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    Re: New Piano Trio

    I did enjoy this. I think I would need to listen to it a few more times to better understand it but I picked up the just of it.

    I think I do learn something from pieces like this even if it's a little beyond me.

    Thanks for posting this.



    Phil

  3. #3
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    Re: New Piano Trio

    I found this piece had a compelling variation in intensity - starting soft then building, then relaxing, coming in waves with a very intense section about two-thirds of the way through followed by a final dying away. Some very agitated emotional textures are created.

    I liked it although it isn't an "easy listening" piece. I'm exploring some atonalish/modern approaches myself - it is an interesting idea to have three tonal "subcenters" move together and then apart.

    Thanks for sharing the music and explaining your approach.

    Herb

  4. #4

    Re: New Piano Trio

    One of the most enjoyable polytonic works I have heard in a while. It makes melodic and haromonic sense without traditional harmonies and counterpoint.

    Good work on the performance aspects of this as well. I prefer to work in Sonar for more complete and minute control of dynamics, but I'd be very interested in your thoughts.

    I have been considering switching to Finale due to Sonar's notation limitations. Please listen to my own recent trio for a comparison of the production results.

    http://www.acidplanet.com/artist.asp?PID=1123552&t=5913
    Regards,
    Albert
    If music be the food of love, play on... Twelfth Night
    www.cscale.com

  5. #5

    Re: New Piano Trio

    Thank you Herb, Albert and Phil for your kind comments.

    Funny it doesn't sound particularly taxing on the listener to me. I wonder sometimes if knowing the complexities of a piece's construction make it seem more complex than it really is. I certainly don't demand from the listener understanding of the theories at work. (Or at least I try not to). If you would rather forget all the polytonal stuff and just listen; fine by me

    Also Albert I listened to your trio; very beautiful and etheral with some compelling interplay between the instruments. I especially enjoyed the recurring rhythmic motive that kept the piece together. Such simple touches can mean everything. As far as Sonar goes I wish I had money to buy it and time to use it . I simply use Sibelius 5 with GPO, and it works well enough for my purposes. My goal is a performance by live musicians so the realization is more of a tool.

    Matt

  6. #6

    Re: New Piano Trio

    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew S Phillips View Post
    Thank you Herb, Albert and Phil for your kind comments.

    Funny it doesn't sound particularly taxing on the listener to me. I wonder sometimes if knowing the complexities of a piece's construction make it seem more complex than it really is. I certainly don't demand from the listener understanding of the theories at work. (Or at least I try not to). If you would rather forget all the polytonal stuff and just listen; fine by me

    Also Albert I listened to your trio; very beautiful and etheral with some compelling interplay between the instruments. I especially enjoyed the recurring rhythmic motive that kept the piece together. Such simple touches can mean everything. As far as Sonar goes I wish I had money to buy it and time to use it . I simply use Sibelius 5 with GPO, and it works well enough for my purposes. My goal is a performance by live musicians so the realization is more of a tool.

    Matt
    Matt,

    Indeed, I think the piece is quite a pleasing listen. And no, your technical description in the post actually enhanced my enjoyment. By pointing out the logic of your polyphony, I was more attentive to the weaving of it.

    As for Sibelius and Sonar, I got started in computer composing on Cakewalk MusicMaker years ago and naturally grew into their flagship (along with GPO). Sibelius seemed too overwhelming at the time, and Finale another big learning curve. I also came to appreciate Sonar's great sequencing and production, which the other two don't really attempt to provide. But similarly, Sonar doesn't make much effort at notation.

    Like you, my desire is to write for live performers. But that has not happened often for me, since I don't get out much with other musicians. So I have stuck with Sonar to produce more realistic sequenced "performances" for now.

    But when I do get an occasional request for sheet music I run into one of two pitfalls. I have provided the bare bones Sonar printouts and asked the performers to take clues from my synth renderings, but that has sometimes lead to disappointing straightforward literal performances (although thankfully not often). Alternatively, I have ported Sonar's MIDI data to Finale PrintMusic and then painstakingly corrected all the data errors, before proceeding with proper notation. But that has proven way too complicated.

    My experiences with PrintMusic, as well as full demo versions of both Finale and Sibelius, have really put a damper on shelling out the big bucks for either. I'm always tempted, yet I don't want to give up too much on the production side, unless I ever get enough pull for my stuff to be performed.

    You have achieved some decent production quality in Sibelius. So I'm interested how much extra effort/learning curve was involved in that, and how satisfied you are. You've answered that partially.

    I'm also interested to learn any ways of coping with the problem of balancing/porting/sharing between scoring and sequencing.

    Regards,
    Albert
    If music be the food of love, play on... Twelfth Night
    www.cscale.com

  7. #7

    Re: New Piano Trio

    An interesting technical conception, Matthew; I appreciate
    the outline of the procedure you provided, as it did much
    toward aiding in understanding the compositional intentions
    of the piece.

    An ambitious and ingenious framework!

    Best,



    David

  8. #8

    Re: New Piano Trio

    Praise from the master! Thanks David!

    I am still a bit ambivalent about whether I feel the elments of construction should "aid" in enjoying the work. I wonder, had I said nothing would I have gotten a cooler or warmer reception? Or exactly the same reception?

    Obviously I wrote the theory stuff so I can't complain too much...

    Matt

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