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Topic: Several questions

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  1. #1

    Several questions

    Using the Solo strings, all have vibrato on the lowest note. How do you do that?

    Accidentals. Are there some conventions to follow apart from readability? I somewhere read that going down will generate a flat and going up a sharp, but looking at the score of Cesar Franck's symphony the editor had other ideas. Please give me something to read about this issue.

    Tremolo. Difficult stuff. Of course one can notate some beams at the stem to make it e.g. 1/32 or 1/64. But what happens when the speed/tempo augments? Listening to some samples to me it looked quite impossible to do this. I know the difference between measured and unmeasured tremolos, but what is orchestral practice?

    Raymond
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  2. #2

    Re: Several questions

    Hi Raymond,

    Quote Originally Posted by Notecracker View Post
    Using the Solo strings, all have vibrato on the lowest note. How do you do that?
    Yes, commonly, the open tone one the lowest string is sans vibrato. However, it is possible to produce a sympathetic vibrato in any open string by silently fingering and applying vibrato to the pitch an octave above.

    Quote Originally Posted by Notecracker View Post
    Accidentals. Are there some conventions to follow apart from readability? I somewhere read that going down will generate a flat and going up a sharp, but looking at the score of Cesar Franck's symphony the editor had other ideas. Please give me something to read about this issue.
    The rule you cite is customary in passages without key signature. Obviously, in sharp keys one would notate sharps, up or down, and in flat keys, flats, down or up. I would tend to follow the key signature, i.e., using sharps for non-key tones in a sharp key and flats in a flat key. However, it also depends on the key. Many minor keys have a sharpened leading tone, e.g., d-minor and g-minor, and it would be quite unusual to spell these as flats. Harmonic considerations are commonly accommodated in note spellings, where appropriate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Notecracker View Post
    Tremolo. Difficult stuff. Of course one can notate some beams at the stem to make it e.g. 1/32 or 1/64. But what happens when the speed/tempo augments? Listening to some samples to me it looked quite impossible to do this. I know the difference between measured and unmeasured tremolos, but what is orchestral practice?
    It is customary for string players to attempt to literally play the tremolo divisions you've asked for (the same goes for timpanists by the way). If the divisions are physically impossible due to the tempo, the concertmaster or conductor will ask to drop down one level of division (or maybe to the intervening triplet subdivision). Very occasionally, the subdivision may be increased. There is also an actual unmeasured notation convention ( 'z' over the stem, I believe) or the composer can write "unmeasured" at the start of the passage. In any event, depending on the skill of the section, some passages will actually tend to sound unmeasured depending on the palyers' ability to sync up.

  3. #3

    Re: Several questions

    DarwinKopp,

    Too long for quoting. Thank you for these answers.

    Raymond
    Visit my website

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