• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Topic: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    I've been thinking about this for a while. Anyone on the forums write for Corps? Pointers to the instrumentation? Clefs? Finale template?

    It's probalby just a passing fancy, but I think it would be fun to arrange for a corps, and I think I have a piece that might lend itself to the instrumentation.

    Thanks
    Pat Azzarello
    http://www.patazzarello.com

  2. #2

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    Hello Pat,
    I did some back in the day, but it was when bugles were 2 valve instead of 3 valve so I don't think clefs, etc. would apply. Writing for drum corps is a blast! (sorry, bad pun) Just make sure to use lots of fff and ffff.

    -Kevin
    We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams …
    24" 2.4 Ghz iMac, OSX 10.4.10, MOTU 828 MKII, 2 Glyph 250 Gig external drives, Logic 9, Finale 2008 GPO, JABB, Strad, Gro, Reason 4, EWQL Storm Drum, Adrenaline, Symphonic Choirs, SO Gold,All Arturia Synths, Many NI Synths, Spectrasonics Synths, KH Strings, VEPro on a Windows 7 4x 2.8 Ghz 12 gig of RAM

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    39

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    There is a template in Finale for Drum Corps.

    Typical Instrumentation:
    Soprano 1
    Soprano 2
    Soprano 3
    Mellophone 1
    Mellophone 2 (sometimes French Horn)
    Baritone 1
    Baritone 2
    Baritone 3
    Contra Bass

    It is also typical to split Soprano 1 and Baritone 1 into 2 parts.

    Derek

  4. #4

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Kiltie View Post
    There is a template in Finale for Drum Corps.

    Typical Instrumentation:
    Soprano 1
    Soprano 2
    Soprano 3
    Mellophone 1
    Mellophone 2 (sometimes French Horn)
    Baritone 1
    Baritone 2
    Baritone 3
    Contra Bass

    It is also typical to split Soprano 1 and Baritone 1 into 2 parts.

    Derek
    This is a very typical instrumentation for D & B corps horns. I have not written for them for a number of years, but I believe that they are more or less compatible, key-wise, with standard band brass. So:
    soprano bugle = trumpet in Bb
    mellophone bugle (or french horn bugle) = mellophone in F
    baritone bugle = trombone or baritone in bass clef (concert pitch)
    contra-bass bugle = tuba in bass clef

    To wax nostalgic for a moment, time was when all the bugles were in the key of G, and were, for the most part, all written in treble clef. The move from 2-valve to 3-valve began in the early nineties and has gradually led to the adoption of standard brass writing keys in the past decade.

    Have fun writing!
    Brad Pearson
    THG Music
    Spokane WA

    MacBook Pro (2.33 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo), 3 gig RAM, OS 10.6.5, Finale 2011b, GPO4 & CMB2

  5. #5

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    Thanks folks. I appreciate the input. If there's more, I'll be glad to hear it.
    Pat Azzarello
    http://www.patazzarello.com

  6. #6

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    There's also some other choices you can make when writing. Some write for 4 baritones, while others write for 2 baritones and 2 euphoniums (same clef and everything, it all depends on what the corps has and your writing choice). Also, some of the newer Contras have four valves like some of the BBb or CC tubas, so you can write for an extended range on those.

    Are you just writing for horns, or are you doing percussion/battery as well?
    Anthony Abruscato

    "There are only two types of music: Love Songs and Pirate Music"

    HP Pavillion dv6171cl w/ Windows Vista Home Premium 64-bit, 2 GB Ram, 250 GB 5200 RPM HD + an external 300 GB HD. GPO, JABB, CAMB, Sibelius 5.1, Finale 2008a, and a demo copy of FL studio.

  7. #7

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    Quote Originally Posted by raz.bari.88 View Post
    There's also some other choices you can make when writing. Some write for 4 baritones, while others write for 2 baritones and 2 euphoniums (same clef and everything, it all depends on what the corps has and your writing choice).
    Anthony, what is the functional difference between Euphoniums and Baritones? I know there is a subtle difference, for instance, between trumpets and cornets. But, in practical use, they are interchangable.

    Is the situation with Baris and Euphs similar?

  8. #8

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    As far as I know, there are no editors that have symbols for drum corp percussion. I have seen people make-do with what is available, and I have seen not-so-good attempts at fonts. I would love to see fonts that have flams, ruffs,7/9/10 stroke rolls etc.,in an easy to use format, not doing two or three things to get a simple icon for a part.(I love percussion names...paradiddles, ratamacues)

  9. #9

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    Quote Originally Posted by raweber View Post
    Anthony, what is the functional difference between Euphoniums and Baritones? I know there is a subtle difference, for instance, between trumpets and cornets. But, in practical use, they are interchangable.

    Is the situation with Baris and Euphs similar?
    That's easy. Baritones are for wimpy, girly men while Euphoniums are for the real men. (Can you tell I marched euphonium in DCI?)

    You can look at it this way, from a choral perspective:

    Baritones are tenors
    Euphs are baritones
    Contras are bass

    -Kevin
    We are the music makers, we are the dreamers of dreams …
    24" 2.4 Ghz iMac, OSX 10.4.10, MOTU 828 MKII, 2 Glyph 250 Gig external drives, Logic 9, Finale 2008 GPO, JABB, Strad, Gro, Reason 4, EWQL Storm Drum, Adrenaline, Symphonic Choirs, SO Gold,All Arturia Synths, Many NI Synths, Spectrasonics Synths, KH Strings, VEPro on a Windows 7 4x 2.8 Ghz 12 gig of RAM

  10. #10

    Re: Drum and Bugle Corps arranging

    Quote Originally Posted by LFO View Post
    Baritones are tenors
    Euphs are baritones
    So there is a range difference? Just a couple of night ago I was reading an orchestration book (I read texts on orchestration for fun before bed, what does that say about me? Probably that I'm not spending enough time actually orchestrating)

    Anyway, in the chapter on rarely used orchestral instruments, Mr. Kennan made the statement that the range is similar enough that they can be used interchangably.

    Anyone want to apply some note ranges to these two instruments? Snor, you've been pretty quiet on this thread...

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •