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Topic: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

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  1. #1

    Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    Hey there,

    I know that I'm not the only fan of Andrea's great guitar libraries here. So, this question is for those who own his Warm Jazz Library:

    Has someone tried to use it for Rockabilly stuff, be it BigBand-Swing like Brian Setzer does currently or in a "classic" Rockabilly environment (trio or quartet)?

    Edit: I don't own it so I'd like to hear of experiences from users.

    The guitar itself of course should be fine but I don't know if a Rockabilly guitarist would use the neck pickup which is the one Andrea sampled...

    Cheers,

    thorsten

  2. #2

    Re: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    Obviously the name P**ttinhouse may not be posted here (strangely I can write it but when I post the thread it just disappears??)...but I hope it is still allowed to ask other members about their experiences with these products? Anyway, those who own Warm Jazz know which product I'm referring to...;-)

  3. #3

    Re: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    Who cares if a real guitarist would use the neck pickup? These are samples, not the real thing. If it sounds good to you, use it.

    This obsession with trying to make samples work exactly like the real thing is just silly. They are NOT the real thing, just the equivalent of a snapshot of the real thing.
    Composer, Logic Certified Trainer, Level 2,
    author of "Going Pro with Logic Pro 9."

    www.jayasher.com

  4. #4

    Re: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    Hi Jay,

    I think you got me wrong. I totally agree with you, samples will never be as great as the real thing. For example, I've bought "myriads" of piano libraries, some of them I really love like the White Grand, but none of them gives me an experience like sitting down at my Bluthner grand, run-down, detuned and shabby as it may be ;-).

    I'm not making scores or jingles, so I actually don't want to spend hours and hours to try to achieve the real thing with samples. I just want to make some decent sounding demos for songs. Be it just to give the "real thing" a good reference for possible later real recordings. And of course we know that managements, publishers etc. today obviously are mostly not able anymore to judge a song by a quick demo...at least over here in Germany ;-)

    So, coming back to my original question: I do not own P**ttinhouse Warm Jazz, so I don't know if it sounds right. I just had some ideas for Rockabilly/Setzer-Swing stuff recently and I'd like to know from people who use it if it makes sense to consider buying this library just for this purpose...

    Cheers

    Thorsten

  5. #5

    Re: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    Lyrical Distortion's Wicked is a Gretsch “Brian Setzer Nashville” electric guitar.

    Doesn't get any more Brian Setzer than that

    EDIT: Never mind - thought you were looking for something that direction.

    To answer your question though, the Brian Setzer sound is not a neck pickup sound, but who say's you can't.

  6. #6

    Re: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashermusic View Post
    Who cares if a real guitarist would use the neck pickup? These are samples, not the real thing. If it sounds good to you, use it.

    This obsession with trying to make samples work exactly like the real thing is just silly. They are NOT the real thing, just the equivalent of a snapshot of the real thing.
    If I may say :

    -my 1st observation would be to state that IMHO there may be softer, more polite and talk-incentive ways to express a disagreement or different opinion than putting in the same sentence words like "obsession" and "just silly".
    But of course, that's just me....

    -my 2nd observation would be to suggest anyway that it does NOT sound that unapropriate to me, to display preferences about which pickup has been chosen for recording a sampled 6 string : as a" sampled guitar libraries addict" myself, I for one think that the seelcted pickup makes a big difference in the tone of the guitar, be it EVEN a sampled one, a difference which will NOT be compensated for with EQ -or perhaps yes, but with a lot of pain and tweaking skills-

    -that being said, as an owner of the W. J (did I go too far here with that one, I don't know), I can just say it's very good and...eh, warm.
    I'm not that versed into rockabilly to figure out if it would fit the bill, but it's versatile in its genre and very cost-effective.
    My 2 cents.

  7. #7

    Re: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    Quote Originally Posted by sirbellog View Post
    If I may say :

    -my 1st observation would be to state that IMHO there may be softer, more polite and talk-incentive ways to express a disagreement or different opinion than putting in the same sentence words like "obsession" and "just silly".
    But of course, that's just me....

    -my 2nd observation would be to suggest anyway that it does NOT sound that unapropriate to me, to display preferences about which pickup has been chosen for recording a sampled 6 string : as a" sampled guitar libraries addict" myself, I for one think that the seelcted pickup makes a big difference in the tone of the guitar, be it EVEN a sampled one, a difference which will NOT be compensated for with EQ -or perhaps yes, but with a lot of pain and tweaking skills-

    -that being said, as an owner of the W. J (did I go too far here with that one, I don't know), I can just say it's very good and...eh, warm.
    I'm not that versed into rockabilly to figure out if it would fit the bill, but it's versatile in its genre and very cost-effective.
    My 2 cents.

    Re: #1 Yes, I canbe blunt. When I think something is silly, I simply say so. But I have to think that it is REALLY silly to say it THAT bluntly but this issue is of epidemic proportions so I do not soft-pedal my views on this.

    Re: #2 Of course. What I am saying is if I hear a demo of a sampled guitar and think to myself, "Hey, that would sound great on this Rockabilly track I am working on" I am not going to worry about the pickup, since it is not real and all guitars used on Rockabilly tracks do not sound alike. Those guitarists id not limit themselves to 1 guitar or 1 sound.
    Composer, Logic Certified Trainer, Level 2,
    author of "Going Pro with Logic Pro 9."

    www.jayasher.com

  8. #8

    Re: Warm Jazz for Rockabilly?

    I can't say what it may be like for rockabilly, but for jazz, it's excellent (hence the name 'warm jazz'). I have it and wouldn't use anything else for this type of music. I'll have a go later and see what I can make it do that might suit your needs.

    K

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