• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Topic: Mozart Requiem

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Senior Member sd cisco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    832

    Mozart Requiem

    Hello;
    I have rendered several pieces from Mozart's Requiem in D Minor, the Intro and first part and then the waltz, called Lacrimosa. I made use of the GPO4 Choir, some of which I exported from Cubase, just the choir tracks, gave them some audio treatment like chorus etc. then brought them back into the mix as an audio track, sometimes in multiple instances, and blended that with the existing choir tracks. Otherwise though, I pretty much left the music intact. Mozart wrote this requiem for a Count who commissioned it in honor of his recently deceased wife. This was the summer of 1791 and Mozart died on December 5, 1791.

    Mozart Requiem - excerpts - GPO4 + sd cisco

    Best regards,
    sd cisco

  2. #2

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    A beautiful rendering, and I've heard quite a few (CD) performances of this piece (my own, other people's, sampler CDs, and of course in Amadeus). I've listened carefully, and the tempi are of course debatable. I like them faster, but that's a matter of taste. I also found the timpani a bit too heavy. In Mozart's time, the balance in the orchestra was a bit different, and the (so-called authentic) performances I've heard all keep the timpani light and percussive. The introitus could also do with a bit more legato phrasing, but that's subtle.

    The only points that can be "objectively" improved (at least to my subjective ear), are the string attack in the Cum Sanctis (it's too fast), the slight harshness of the strings in the Lacrimosa and the timpani roll at the end (slowing it down by 1/3 and slowly increasing the velocity should do it).

    But otherwise, a fine rendition of a masterpiece. Nice!

  3. #3
    Senior Member sd cisco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    832

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    Hey FL;
    Thanks for your thoughtful listening, and well considered comments. I would tend to agree with you on most points. There are so many things to try to focus on and not miss when working on a project with these dimensions, and so many versions available to reference. Perhaps today I can apply myself to the drum roll at the end of Lacrimosa, I think I would like to try what you have suggested. Speaking of tempi, I found a video of Leonard Bernstein conducting the Lacrimosa at about 1/3 the tempo as is normally used! Very slow and deliberate. He had a tendency later in life to do this, as with the Brahms D Minor Piano Concerto/Glenn Gould recording. You didn't comment on the choir! The minimal choir offering in GPO4 doesn't give you much to work with besides Ooohs and Aaahs, the former much softer than the later, but at least you have something. On the string tone you reference, I tried this a number of different ways, but finally decided I needed a certain amount of bite in it, as usual, choosing the lesser of evils!
    Thanks again for your fine ear! BTW, you say you have produced the Requiem? I would like to hear it if possible.
    Best regards,
    sd cisco

  4. #4

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    The reason I didn't comment on the choir, nor the wind instruments, is that they are quite good. And indeed, you can be proud of what you did with just oohs and aahs: I didn't miss the original words.

    Bernstein was a great conductor, but also a great romantic. I love his Mahler, his Brahms, and also his 20th century work (Gershwin, Copland, himself), but I've come to like Baroque and classical music better in the "authentic" performance style, but that's really subjective.

    And unfortunately, I've never produced anything, apart from some amateur music. It should be nice to have a job producing classical music, but I'm a software engineer. I've only heard really a lot of different performances of Mozart's Requiem over the years, since nearly every conductor has recorded it, and so my friends all have different versions, and these sample CDs that record companies hand out sometimes have parts with yet other interpretations, etc.

    Anyway, your rendering/performance has real musical quality, and shows quite some skill in using our favorite tool.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    314

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    Hi SD,

    I enjoyed your rendering of the Mozart very much.

    In reference to your comment regarding Bernstein's slow tempo in the Brahms Piano Concerto in D minor, it was actually Glenn Gould's interpretation. I happened to hear a radio broadcast of the Gould/Bernstein performance of that work, and Bernstein found it necessary to make a little speech to the audience prior to the performance, explaining that there was a disagreement between himself and Gould regarding tempo, and, of course, he deferred to the soloist.

    Best Regards,

    Jack

  6. #6

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    SD:

    A very challenging piece to render, but you have done a wonderful
    job of bringing it to digital life........

    I really enjoyed listening. Mozart is one of my favorite classical
    composers and your rendition of excerpts of the Requiem made me
    aware even more so that he was a true genius.

    Thanks,

    Jack
    Jack Cannon--MacBook Pro (2015, 13") GPO4/5, JABB3, Auth. STEINWAY, YAMAHA CFX, Gofriller CELLO, Stradivari VIOLIN, COMB2, WORLD, HARPS, PIPE ORGANS, FINALE 2014.5, Mac Pro 2.66 GHz CPU, 8 GB RAM, DP 9.5, MOTU Traveler, MOTU Micro Express, MacBook Pro (2012, 13") 2.2 Ghz CPU, 8 GB RAM.

  7. #7

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    Very well done, SD!

    On the matter of interpretation... there are certainly
    parts of this I would do very differently, particularly in
    regard to tempi.

    And I'm sure if you picked any six conductors, they'd
    come to fisticuffs over the "right" way to do it, with not
    a one of them agreeing on anything whatosever.

    More to the point, though, when I listen, I try to absorb
    the vision of the individual conductor for the work. If
    the thinking behind it is sound, regardless of convention
    or violation of it, the result is a cogent, persuasive
    presentation of the work.

    Which, my friend, I would say you have achieved.

    My best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member sd cisco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    832

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    Quote Originally Posted by jacksiru View Post
    Hi SD,

    I enjoyed your rendering of the Mozart very much.

    In reference to your comment regarding Bernstein's slow tempo in the Brahms Piano Concerto in D minor, it was actually Glenn Gould's interpretation. I happened to hear a radio broadcast of the Gould/Bernstein performance of that work, and Bernstein found it necessary to make a little speech to the audience prior to the performance, explaining that there was a disagreement between himself and Gould regarding tempo, and, of course, he deferred to the soloist.

    Best Regards,

    Jack
    Hi Jack;
    Thank you for your kind comments, glad you liked it!!
    Re. Bernstein and slow tempo - see this and compare to just about any other rendition.........
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rpa-THiJJYY

    Thank you and take care!
    sd cisco

  9. #9
    Senior Member sd cisco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    832

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhap2 View Post
    SD:

    A very challenging piece to render, but you have done a wonderful
    job of bringing it to digital life........

    I really enjoyed listening. Mozart is one of my favorite classical
    composers and your rendition of excerpts of the Requiem made me
    aware even more so that he was a true genius.

    Thanks,

    Jack
    Thanks Jack!!
    You are quite right, it was a big challenge to work on this project, especially since it was my first attempt to get the GPO4 Choir Lite into meaningful action. However, if some of Mozart's incredible genius came through, it means I have succeeded to that extent, and if enjoyable too, icing on the cake!!
    Best regards,
    sd cisco

  10. #10
    Senior Member sd cisco's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    832

    Re: Mozart Requiem

    Quote Originally Posted by etLux View Post
    Very well done, SD!

    On the matter of interpretation... there are certainly
    parts of this I would do very differently, particularly in
    regard to tempi.

    And I'm sure if you picked any six conductors, they'd
    come to fisticuffs over the "right" way to do it, with not
    a one of them agreeing on anything whatosever.

    More to the point, though, when I listen, I try to absorb
    the vision of the individual conductor for the work. If
    the thinking behind it is sound, regardless of convention
    or violation of it, the result is a cogent, persuasive
    presentation of the work.

    Which, my friend, I would say you have achieved.

    My best,



    David
    -----
    David Sosnowski
    www.DavidSosnowski.com
    Hello David!
    I must say, you can make the most wonderful and original comments!!
    And you are very good at illustrious and imaginative compliments as well!!!
    Though the "personalizing" part of artistic expression pulls a thing in a unique and sometimes never before seen direction, and thus be strange and unfamiliar to the audience, the important part, is that it all pulls together, within itself, towards a common end.
    Thank you very much for your comments and compliments!
    Best regards,
    sd cisco

Go Back to forum
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •