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Topic: Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

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  1. #1

    Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

    Well it took some experimentation - and an email to Garth at Chicken Systems - but I am now happily translating my entire EPS/ASR library into Kontakt format.

    It's true I'll probably only use a small fraction of those instruments, but in addition to the ones I know I want there are some cool "old friends" I might not have otherwise thought of, and instead of having to do the translation on-the-spot I'll have access to all of it all the time.

    The key was a couple of settings that I had forgotten about, so for anyone attempting this trick:
    1) be sure to set the sample "type" properly in the Ensoniq Format Options - the default is "ASR" and if you use that for early EPS instruments you'll run into all sorts of loop problems.
    2) if you want to convert the CC messages to key-switches you'll need to set that in the Ensoniq format page as well, and you need to check the option that combines the four presets into a single instrument.

    Other than that you may want to set destination options to create the file hierarchy you prefer, but that was all that was required to get me on track.

    And thanks Garth for answering my query so promptly!

    Bill
    Bill Thompson
    Audio Enterprise
    KB3KJF

  2. #2

    Re: Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

    Hi,

    If you care to share/swap or sell what you come up with please let me know. My TS-12 died before I could get it all ported over to my PC. I still have Giebler's disks and they didn't always work for copying. So whatever you come up with, please post or PM me to discuss.

    Thanks!

    ---JC



    Quote Originally Posted by wst3ae View Post
    Well it took some experimentation - and an email to Garth at Chicken Systems - but I am now happily translating my entire EPS/ASR library into Kontakt format.

    It's true I'll probably only use a small fraction of those instruments, but in addition to the ones I know I want there are some cool "old friends" I might not have otherwise thought of, and instead of having to do the translation on-the-spot I'll have access to all of it all the time.

    The key was a couple of settings that I had forgotten about, so for anyone attempting this trick:
    1) be sure to set the sample "type" properly in the Ensoniq Format Options - the default is "ASR" and if you use that for early EPS instruments you'll run into all sorts of loop problems.
    2) if you want to convert the CC messages to key-switches you'll need to set that in the Ensoniq format page as well, and you need to check the option that combines the four presets into a single instrument.

    Other than that you may want to set destination options to create the file hierarchy you prefer, but that was all that was required to get me on track.

    And thanks Garth for answering my query so promptly!

    Bill

  3. #3

    Re: Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

    Hi JC -

    There are some questions about the license associated with the samples themselves, and the generally accepted interpretation seems to be that you need to have the originally purchased samples in order to use them on another platform. Some folks claim you can't even transfer them to other platforms, but that wasn't how I interpreted it - and I'm pretty sure poor Garth would be up to his eyeballs in lawyers if that were the case!

    However, I am pretty sure I can not sell the translated samples, which I suppose means I can't give them away either. I am open to alternate interpretations of the license...

    In the meantime, here is the recipe that has been working for me:

    In the case of the CDs it really could not be simpler. I tried Kontakt2, Kontakt3, and Translator. Of the three Translator gave me the most flexibility, so that's what I'm using. It is possible that the import facility in Kontakt4 has been extended, there is some indication on the NI web site that this is the case, but there are no details.

    Anyway, if you have the CDs all you need to do is put the disc in the drive and start the program of your choice. You will be presented with the contents of the CD in the program browser.

    I choose one of the first level directories instead of the root simply because I'm impatient<G>, you can probably import the entire CD in one pass if you don't mind waiting.

    The only options (In Translator) that you need to worry about are:
    1) set the sample type to EPS or ASR as appropriate
    2) set the import to combine the four patches into one instrument
    3) set the import to translate the patch select buttons to key switches
    4) set the key switch to start at "C-1" (many instruments extend down to C0)
    5) you'll want to set up the destination directory location and hierarchy to your tastes. I have it set to place the nki in the instrument folder and the samples in a sub-folder in that directory.

    That's pretty much it. You may want to go in and tweak envelopes or loop points, but I haven't run across any that were glaringly bad yet.

    One thing to note about Translator 2.9.123, the current version - there is a bug that prevents the base key for key-switching to stick to "C-1". It's an annoyance, and I believe it is fixed in the upcoming release.

    If you only have the floppies, well, the whole process is slightly more complicated.

    You'll need a computer with a floppy drive connected to the floppy controller - USB floppy drives do not yet work properly. It is reported that this will be resolved in the near future by someone. We'll see.

    Translator and MIDI Disk Tools from Chicken Systems can both read floppies under pretty much any version of Windows. Way back when I first started this adventure (I was importing into GS2<G>) I had to keep a Win98 machine around because that was the only way I could reliably read the floppies. I haven't tried in a while, but lots of folks have reported that it works in XP.

    The browser window will now present you with the contents of the floppy, and from there you just follow the directions above.

    I can not confirm that this works in any version of Kontakt as I don't have a floppy drive installed at the moment. I will be re-installing one shortly and I'll report back.

    I'm not sure if this is what you were looking for, if you have specific questions please ask away!

    Bill
    Bill Thompson
    Audio Enterprise
    KB3KJF

  4. #4

    Cool Re: Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

    Check this out:

    DigitalSoundFactory: Ensoniq

    The old Ensoniq library has been ported to newer formats.

    May or may not be an answer for you.

    Hope this is useful.
    It is what it is...

    ScrewMakerMusic

  5. #5

    Re: Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

    Quote Originally Posted by ankely View Post
    Check this out:
    The old Ensoniq library has been ported to newer formats.

    May or may not be an answer for you.

    Hope this is useful.
    It'll be useful to someone I'm certain! These came out after I had purchased the factory CDs, so I decided to spend the time converting instead of the money! If these had been available several years ago when I was still converting from floppies it would have been a no-brainer!

    Thanks,

    Bill
    Bill Thompson
    Audio Enterprise
    KB3KJF

  6. #6

    Re: Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

    Thanks!

    I'm hopeful, but not ecstatic because (sorry for the geekliness which follows).

    The TS-10 was a feat of -amazing- programming that most people do not realise. It dwarfed the ASR in many ways and even it's successor.

    The problem is that -many- of the factory sounds were -very- wimpy when compared with their competitors. They did a dreadful job of displaying what it -could- do. I'd say the same for the DX-7's factory sounds. But whereas Yamaha immediately brought out legions of guys who made -totally- happening sounds, Ensoniq left most of that potential on the table.

    Still, a lot of the factory programs displayed very clearly how deep was the programming power of the thing. You could make really evolving and dynamic sounds by combining all manner of much simpler WAVs; each with completely independent envelopes and CC data and still have 32 voice polyphony---much more like we do with Kontakt than anything else available at the time.

    So if one sold me a sample lib of a TS-12 which was merely a recording of it's outputs, it wouldn't give me the flexibility to make it sound as expressive as a 'real' TS-12. For that, one would need individual 'groups' or layers programmed as on the original machine. Now -that- would be a labour of love.

    Anyhoo... THANKS AGAIN. But I sure hope that -someone-, somewhere does a thorough sampling of this thing as has been done with other 'antiques'. It really -was- quite something, despite their dreadful marketing.

    ---JC


    Quote Originally Posted by ankely View Post
    Check this out:

    DigitalSoundFactory: Ensoniq

    The old Ensoniq library has been ported to newer formats.

    May or may not be an answer for you.

    Hope this is useful.

  7. #7

    Re: Update - translating EPS/ASR into Kontakt

    Quote Originally Posted by ankely View Post
    Check this out:

    DigitalSoundFactory: Ensoniq

    The old Ensoniq library has been ported to newer formats.

    May or may not be an answer for you.

    Hope this is useful.
    This is looking great! Sadly only soundfont and Emu Proteus format.

    Did someone test how their soundfonts sound, once converted in Kontakt?

    Thanks,
    Peter.

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