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Topic: Perception of right versus left brain

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  1. #1

    Perception of right versus left brain

    Hi everyone, this link is very interesting -- which way is the dancer turning? Left brain folks see it one way, and right-brainers, another. those with both sides about equal may see it both ways, alternating. Starte at it for awhile, and you may see your brain "switch" the direction by itself. When I first saw it, I thought that it was obviously turning clockwise and that there was *no way* it could be anything else -- until I looked at it for awhile.

    I found this to be one of the more compelling left-right brain exercises... see what you think....

    http://www.creativethinking.net/DX09...htm?Entry=Good
    _____________________
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  2. #2

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    Have seen this before and sometimes it is hard to see the direction. This is a good brain trainer, but a better one is: when left handed try to brush your teeth with your right hand and if you are right handed try to do it with you left hand. Be aware, this can damage your teeth and I am NOT paying your dentist bill!!!

    Raymond - still having his teeth

    [By the way: my house is still under construction and really a complete mess; another three weeks to go before I really can upgrade my "studio" with new monitors. Probably KrK Rokit 8 powered monitors]

  3. #3

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    I went to this link in my office (after composing for a good 20 minutes), and the dancer was going clockwise, no doubt about it!

    So then I go give my students a test and leave the link up. My screen goes into sleep mode and I spend a couple of hours grading tests.

    I pull it back up and now she's going counter-clockwise, clear as day!!

    Guess I was using my logic/detail centers to grade papers.

    Matt

  4. #4

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    If you watch it for a while (perhaps focus on the foot) you can kind of make her change direction at will... even not turning, but just going back and forth

    Although I don't know why this is purported as having anything to do with left vs right brain...
    Sean Patrick Hannifin
    My MP3s | My Melody Generator | my album
    "serious music" ... as if the rest of us are just kidding

  5. #5

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    There is no such thing as right vs. left brain. Your brain (hopefully) has two hemispheres which undertake overlapping tasks. E.g., your left peripheral field of vision (that is the left half of both eyes) is processed right and vice versa. Now, a normal person has no problems recognizing something whether it is on the left or on the right side of his head, but this recognition originates in different hemispheres. Consequently, both hemispheres do, more or less, the same (in visual recognition). For the rest there is very little evidence that both halves do really different tasks. E.g. language (my topic of expertise) is usually supposed to be seated left, but most studies also show activation in the right hemisphere. Also, while right side lesions (i.e. big damage) are not as bad for the language faculty as specific damage on the left (think Broca), it does affect language performance. It is supposed that the right side can actually take over when the left falls out. Some aphasia therapy is based on this idea.

    Anyway, left and right dominance is used too freely. There is some "dominance" with respect to movement (e.g. most people are either left or right-handed) which has to originate somewhere in the central nerve system, but I don't think creativity has been associated firmly with a particular hemisphere.
    Theo

  6. #6

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    Hi Theo, Sean,

    I am no brain expert (except that I have one -- I think! LOL!), so with a grain of salt -- It does seem to me that there is some dominance we come with, or grow into. This TED talk by a neuroanatomist who had a stroke that took out a good part of the left side of her brain is behind my belief in that: http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/j...f_insight.html

    (Very entertaining speaker, BTW). But I also agree with you that it is not something cut in stone and that the brain can re-learn (in either hemisphere) any task when needed. I heard once that one thing that distinguished Einstein's brain from the average is the huge number of neural paths, or interconnections -- presumably a result not only of nature but also of exercising them....

    Karen
    _____________________
    Listen at: www.soundclick.com/kepeaceusa
    Scores at: http://stores.lulu.com/ke_peace

  7. #7

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    I haven't watched the TED talk yet, but I will when I get home...

    I'm not sure I'd say any part of the brain can take over any task, but it's definitely placid so that it can change and be retrained (in rather mysterious ways); just perhaps not perfectly and perhaps not for any task at all. (It is wired in a specific way, after all, and not just a lump of neurons that sorts itself out differently in everyone. And there are many things we cannot train ourselves to do.)

    Anyway, I think the "left brain vs right brain" is a misnomer, and is often used more as a concept describing personality traits rather than implying a person's physical right or left side of the brain is "dominant".

    I do believe personality traits and interests can arise from a person's cognitive make-up and DNA, but I'm not sure I'd describe those traits as necessarily being "creative" vs "logic" ... everyone needs to be both, and I don't think they're really separate cognitive functions. Not being interested in writing or composing or painting (being "artistic") doesn't mean you're uncreative, at least not cognitively. And not being interested in chess and math and crossword puzzles and quantum physics and programming doesn't mean you're less logical.

    But ... my original point was ... I have no idea what any of this has to do with which way a 3-dimensionally ambiguous silhouette is perceived as turning. Where in the world does that come from?! Someone must have just made that up...

    But it's still a really fun image!
    Sean Patrick Hannifin
    My MP3s | My Melody Generator | my album
    "serious music" ... as if the rest of us are just kidding

  8. #8
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    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    cw and acw as seen from above the dancer.

    It has nothing to do with the way the brain is organized into two halves and any claimed influence on the intellect and emotion.

    In this specific case, it is simply a matter of which part of the female body the observer might wish to look at.

    If you look at the legs or the top of the body, you can see the dancer turn either way at will. If you look at the hips, the dancer turns cw. This is what a graphic artist or draftsman would recognize as projections of a three dimensional body on to a plane. The sequence of projections can give away the direction of rotation. In this case the hips only set the direction of rotation uniquely and only for part of the time.

    We are very much more complex then the simplistic and erroneous explanation given with the dancer.

    This is as I see it.

    Herbert
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  9. #9

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    Quote Originally Posted by sonata5920 View Post
    cw and acw as seen from above the dancer.

    It has nothing to do with the way the brain is organized into two halves and any claimed influence on the intellect and emotion.

    In this specific case, it is simply a matter of which part of the female body the observer might wish to look at.

    If you look at the legs or the top of the body, you can see the dancer turn either way at will. If you look at the hips, the dancer turns cw. This is what a graphic artist or draftsman would recognize as projections of a three dimensional body on to a plane. The sequence of projections can give away the direction of rotation. In this case the hips only set the direction of rotation uniquely and only for part of the time.

    We are very much more complex then the simplistic and erroneous explanation given with the dancer.

    This is as I see it.

    Herbert
    I can make her turn either way whilst looking at the hips. I do find it easiest to look just below the foot tho to make her change.

    I showed it to my family yesterday. All of them are right handed and could only see it going clockwise. Im a lefty. Im in control.

  10. #10

    Re: Perception of right versus left brain

    I showed it to my dog, and it seemed she couldn't even perceive it as a dancer at all...
    Sean Patrick Hannifin
    My MP3s | My Melody Generator | my album
    "serious music" ... as if the rest of us are just kidding

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