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Topic: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

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  1. #1
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    OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    I had a real health scare that could have lead to a fatal end.

    After several month of feeling more dead than alive during the night and in the morning and not able to breathe freely, just after New Year, I asked Margaret to drive me to the hospital. I was subjected to very elaborate tests over a two week period, all on nation health. National health is appreciated by most in this country. I must say that I enjoyed experiencing all the extraordinary technologies employed.

    I was diagnosed with an irregular heartbeat that only at night, sporadically made my heart beat at an extremely high rate, depriving the body of oxygen and potentially taking the heart into deadly fibrillation. This is the condition where typically an announcement is made at church that, “Fred has passed away peacefully in his sleep, leaving behind …”

    If you suspect a similar health problem, go to a hospital. Do not wait until you are two foot under the soil and your dog respectfully urinates on your grave stone.

    I always thought that I had a good heart. As my friends say, a compassionate heart made of gold and as I know, fierce in the face of hypocrisy and dishonesty.

    Gold is an element with the chemical symbol Au (aurum) and an atomic number of 79. The various cardiologists that took care of me, convinced me, that hearts are never made of gold.

    To get back to health, I had a stainless steel stent implanted and following this, an implant of an Automatic Cardioverter Defibrillator Micro Computer. The device monitors the heart beat and requirements of the body via wires implanted in the heart. Adjustments to the heart are made for irregularities of the heart beat. In case of fibrillation, the heart is stopped and restarted by a high energy electric shock of 42 joules, similar to what you see on TV when pads are put to the chest of a patient, applying a high voltage charge, to restart the heart to a normal rate.

    After the implantation of the Micro Computer, a technician was able to test the electronics, by lowering and then speeding up my heart rate at will via remote control.

    Two weeks on, I feel like new.

    Just as always, best wishes,

    Herbert
    Last edited by sonata5920; 01-28-2010 at 05:08 AM. Reason: typo
    GPO, JABB, CMB, GWI, GOFRILLER, HALION PLAYER, ACCORDIONS by E Tarilonte
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  2. #2

    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    I would beg to differ.

    Taking a moment to warn us about this potential health risk, and sharing your story with us, is clear evidence that you DO have a heart and it is of metaphorical gold.

    I'm happy you've found the road to a return to good health.

  3. #3

    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    Quote Originally Posted by sonata5920 View Post
    After the implantation of the Micro Computer, a technician was able to test the electronics, by lowering and then speeding up my heart rate at will via remote control.
    Intel or AMD?

    Two weeks on, I feel like new.
    ... and that is the best news ever.

    All the best and don't mess up that Remote Control, please. Have batteries at hand, always.

    Raymond

  4. #4
    Senior Member Frank D's Avatar
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    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    Hi Herbert!

    Glad to hear you are on the mend and that your journey had a happy ending ... and good advice to all re: act on symptoms while you can!

    Having read your technical responses in this forum many times, I'm sure you have, more so than others may have, a profound appreciation of the technology employed to keep your "ticker ticking".

    I have a brother-in-law who lived through the evolution of the "pacemaker". His heart was nearly destroyed by a virus and at the time, single-lead models were all that was available. As he deteriorated, science kept pace with him with two, and then finally, three-lead models that sustained him until three years ago, and not a minute too soon, when he finally received a donor heart. Today he is 65 with the stamina of a 35-year old man. God bless him, you, ... and science.

    Regards,

    Frank

  5. #5

    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    Herbert,
    I am impressed that you made the choice to have it checked out.
    Kinda scary though I bet.

    The things that are being achieved in the medical field today are just amazing.
    Thanks for sharing your story!

    Dan

  6. #6

    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    Herbert,

    Glad to hear you got through it OK.

    Now you're bionic!

  7. #7
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    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    Quote Originally Posted by sonata5920 View Post
    Do not wait until you are two foot under the soil and your dog respectfully urinates on your grave stone.
    Glad you're feeling better Herbert - but if you're buried two feet under instead of six - your dog will probably dig you up - AND then urinate on you!

  8. #8

    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    What an amazing story, Herbert. It is so inspiring to hear you come through this experience with your sense of humor strongly intact. Thanks for including us in your life- and take care!

    Randy B.

  9. #9
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    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    Thank you for your caring thoughts and for wishing well.

    Michel – Metaphorical Gold? After testing of the implant I asked the technician: “Is it as good as gold?” She replied: “You can bet on it. It is as good as gold.”

    Raymond – Intel or ADM? It is not a regular processor, but a custom made chip as found in process control situations. Fortunately, I have no ventilation holes in my chest and no noisy fan to put up with. The device has a built-in beeper to warn of a flat battery and other alarm conditions.

    Frank – I will be ordering a workshop manual for the implant. I am pleased for your brother-in-law.

    Dan – Kinda scary? You are right, very scary. Before surgery I was asked to sign contracts to indemnify the medical staff against being sued. I was told that my chance was 1000 to 1 to survive the procedure. Just before I was knocked out, I explained to the surgeon my concern about my chance of 1000 to 1 to survive and asked him to check if I possibly was No 1000, as I would rather wait with the operation. The surgeon replied: “No need to worry Herbert, you are only No 999. We will operate on patient 1000 later in the afternoon.” My very next memory was, looking at a gentle smiling face of a nurse telling me that my operation had been a complete success and asking me if I wanted a cup of tea. I asked for a double scotch, just plain, no ice, no water. I did not get it, perhaps because I was on national health and not privately insured.

    Reegs – bionic! Yes, many body parts can nowadays be replaced by manufactured devices.

    Paul – My dog has never dug up a corpse. I take him regularly to the cemetery where his real master, our son rests. Our son tragically died a few years ago, when a mad person drove his car at high speed onto a pedestrian area.

    Randy – Humor is essential for survival and if you wish to stay sane. Life is outrageously funny most of the time, at times even in the face of adversity. I heard that you are a smoker. Give up smoking. Good living can be fatal. Trust me, I know. I was a heavy smoker. I stopped smoking from one minute to another, some 25 years ago. I now have light forms of emphysema and asthma, though not to a point of great concern, but limiting physical activities. From the minute of giving up smoking, I never had a craving for nicotine, but it took me more than 2 years to overcome the loss of rituals, connected with smoking, as you would understand. At least in my case, smoking had a strong nervous root.


    Many thanks,

    Herbert
    GPO, JABB, CMB, GWI, GOFRILLER, HALION PLAYER, ACCORDIONS by E Tarilonte
    Cubase 6, Notation Composer, VSTHost, GoldWave audio editor.

    Interests:
    Good Food, Gemütlichkeit, Wein Weib und Gesang – History, Politics, Civil Law –
    Electronics, Software Development, Physics – Plant Physiology, Creative Horticulture –
    Photography, Painting, Wood Working - Midi Orchestration, Music, Music, und Musik …

  10. #10

    Re: OT: Herbert has no Heart but a Microprocessor

    Good to see you feeling more alive Herbert.

    This seems like a good time to mention my uncle, a heavy smoker, who had to have a stent put in his heart. They told him before the operation that 95% likely his leg would have to be amputated while he was in surgery and that he had a 80% chance of never waking up.

    He didn't tell his wife any of this. He had a ramp put in at the front door and she never thought to ask why.

    He had the operation, his leg was cut off almost at the hip and he went into a deep coma. Within a few days the stump became gangrenous and they had to take another inch off. Then again, another inch had to come off.

    He developed a fungal infection in the heart that was likely to kill him, his kidneys failed, he had blood poisoning from various organs shutting down. After eight weeks of this they called his wife and children in and told them it was hopeless. They intended to turn the machines off the next day so they should be prepared for the inevitable.

    That night his vitals took a marked improved turn and they decided to persist. An arduous four months went passed where he became well enough to go home on a few day trips and finally go home permanently. He was known around the hospital as their miracle man.

    And what did he do when he got home?

    Lit up a cigarette.

    Ugh.

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