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Topic: keyswitches in Sibelius

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  1. #1

    keyswitches in Sibelius

    I've had GPO for 6 months now, and still can't access the stuff I need, like mallet changes, cymbal changes, rolls, violin tremolos etc that seem available in the manual. How do I go from crash to suspended cymbal? How does G#5 translate to staff text. I am a musician, not a programmer, and am exceedingly frustrated

  2. #2
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
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    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    Most of these effects can be triggered by using Technique Text; I'm not very good with the percussion stuff, but if you post your question on the Sib board, you'll get a faster answer.
    Ron Pearl

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  3. #3

    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    Technique text has a very limited vocabulary, and I don't know how to add to it or to check whether certain terms are recognized.

  4. #4
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
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    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    All the technique text(s) are in the Dictionary, which defines what any text does to the playback. Look for trem., for example, and see if it is there. Not sure what you mean by limited - do you mean teh Expression Text menu?

    If you write say, pizz, it will make the keyswitch happen that allows it to playback the pizz; arco will return it to normal - again, they are in theplayback Dictionary.

    For percussion, check the Sib board.

    Hope that helps.
    Ron Pearl

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    ronaldmpearl.com

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  5. #5

    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    Terms like "medium mallet" or "suspended cymbal" don't appear in the dictionary. I don't want to have to use different staves to switch from a crash to a roll or from soft to hard mallets. And the list of instruments in the GPO manual use key names for accessing instruments. There are rolls and tremolos available that I don't know how to access.

  6. #6

    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    By the way, where is the "Sib board"?

  7. #7

    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    There are (at least) 2 unrelated sets of Sibelius fora:

    One is unrelated to Avid; mostly just Sibelius users helping each other.
    http://www.sibeliusforum.com/forums/

    The other is the official Sibelius "Help" web site, monitored and actively supported by Sibelius support team (and maybe developers).
    http://www.sibelius.com/cgi-bin/help...t.pl?groupid=3

    "How to" questions are readily answered on both sites.
    I think the official Sibelius people seem to look down on sibeliusforum.com which is sort of too bad since it is probably saving them a lot of time and effort.

    I have heard that there is also a Sibelius "Yahoo group". I haven't looked into that (but I probably should).

    Pat

  8. #8
    Senior Member rpearl's Avatar
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    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    The second Sib forum has people from Sibelius who look in on a frequent (daily, if not hourly) basis. And, many helpful users of the program.
    Ron Pearl

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    ronaldmpearl.com

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  9. #9

    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    Quote Originally Posted by dreamchanter View Post
    Terms like "medium mallet" or "suspended cymbal" don't appear in the dictionary. . . . There are rolls and tremolos available that I don't know how to access.
    Pitched percussion and other instruments usually use Dictionary definitions, many of which are already there. So trem is shown by the strokes found in the third keypad layout, and they are already defined by Sibelius. If there isn't a term or articulation defined already you can make one up and then define it: for instance, the Sibelius internal terms like +damp and +motor on etc can be given a name which suits you. It's all in the manual, even though it's a bit of a struggle to get your head around.

    With non-pitched percussion many of the changes have to do with using the right line or space on the percussion staff, the right Notehead, or the right articulation. The way of finding out what notehead does what sounds complicated, but it's the way things are in Sibelius now and it's worth learning.

    Select the stave of the instrument you want and use House Styles > Edit instrument, navigating through any intermediate dialogs until you get to Edit Instrument (singular) dialog. Edit Staff Type then shows you the range of notes defined for that instrument, and you can see what noteheads and articulations are associated with particular sounds. The sounds do have Note-names, as in the Manual, but actual names as well, which helps.

    There is an excellent video tutorial on unpitched percussion in the blog run by the Sibelius Senior Product Manager at
    http://www.sibeliusblog.com/category/tutorials/

    Also, look at the links on the left of this page — there are some Sibelius percussion tutorials which might have some clues
    http://musictechtips.wordpress.com/

  10. #10

    Re: keyswitches in Sibelius

    Quote Originally Posted by Lurker View Post
    ...
    With non-pitched percussion many of the changes have to do with using the right line or space on the percussion staff, the right Notehead, or the right articulation. The way of finding out what notehead does what sounds complicated, but it's the way things are in Sibelius now and it's worth learning.
    In other words, with non-pitched percussion staves there is no relationship between the lines and spaces of a staff and the note to be presented to GPO (or any other sound library). Instead, Sibelius lets you define a relationship between a particular notehead and the note presented.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lurker View Post
    Select the stave of the instrument you want and use House Styles > Edit instrument, navigating through any intermediate dialogs until you get to Edit Instrument (singular) dialog. Edit Staff Type then shows you the range of notes defined for that instrument, and you can see what noteheads and articulations are associated with particular sounds. The sounds do have Note-names, as in the Manual, but actual names as well, which helps.

    There is an excellent video tutorial on unpitched percussion in the blog run by the Sibelius Senior Product Manager at
    http://www.sibeliusblog.com/category/tutorials/
    ...
    Also, search the various Sibelius fora for the term "drum map".

    Pat O'Keefe

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